Author Topic: Chicago Style Dough  (Read 3355 times)

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Offline Randy

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Chicago Style Dough
« on: June 07, 2005, 11:47:43 AM »
I saw a large, almost circle of dough on one of the pizza shows that was covering Chicago deep dish pizza.  An employee was cutting from the fluffy risen dough and pitching them into a machine that rolled them into a ball.
I am guessing the dough was dumped on the board straight from the mixer then allowed to rise before it was portioned into balls.  The dough was a light yellow and had risen quite a bit but it still looked firm.
This show was a few weeks back on the food channel seems like.
Anyone else see that brief shoot?

Randy


Offline DKM

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2005, 03:50:52 PM »
I've seen it before, but it has been quite some time.

DKM
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Offline Randy

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2005, 04:02:15 PM »
To me, that dough looked like it had a long rise with the height and the structure.

Randy

Offline DKM

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2005, 11:43:02 AM »
According to some things I have read it is not uncommon for the dough used for the pizza to be around two days old.

DKM
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Offline buzz

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2005, 09:14:35 AM »
They make huge batches in a commisary and let it sit around at room temperature. I think mostly they use a cooler to store dough, not to give it a refrigerator rise.

Offline Randy

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2005, 10:30:03 AM »
I made my dough yesterday and let it rise under a counter light for 5 hours.  This extra bit of heat was to simulate a warm kitchen temperature that I would expect at a pizza joint.  The dough came to life and produced a dough very much like what was on the video.  If you are trying to duplicate a pizza joint dough then a thought about how warm it is in their kitchen would be in order I would think.  I cut it in half, rolled each half into a ball and stored it in the cooler overnight.
I think I will take it out two hours in advance of panning. 

I was going to use semolina flour but didn't find any at the store this time so I used  2 tablespoons corn meal instead.

As I noted earlier I am going to use WalMart Great Value crushed tomatoes in puree as a test and truth be told, I ran out of 6-in-1.

Offline buzz

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2005, 10:36:19 AM »
Those pizza places are hot, especially in the summer! You can eat pizza and lose weight at the same time!

Offline Randy

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2005, 02:20:49 PM »
That is what I was thinking Buzz.  I was getting ready to make the sauce when I remembered  some saying that the sauce for a Chicago can be wetter.  The Great Value cushed tomatoes have a bit more water in them than the 6in1.

Offline Randy

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2005, 10:49:57 AM »
The pizza was good but I used AP flour instead of bread flour and I was not as happy with it.  I am posting my taste results on Walmart brand tomatoes in the ingredients section.

Randy

Offline buzz

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2005, 11:25:43 AM »
As I recall (it's been a while since I've looked at her book), Evelyn Slomon, who interviewed pizza place owners in Chicago and New York, says that most use a slightly higher gluten flour (like Ceresota/Hecker's), as opposed to bread flour. But, as with all food items, your own palate dictates what's right!

Have you tried Progresso crushed tomatoes?


Offline Randy

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2005, 11:45:57 AM »
Progresso brand is not a common brand here although I have seen a few products by them but not crushed tomatoes.  I will try them when I find them.

Randy

Offline buzz

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2005, 11:48:28 AM »
Do you have S&W? Very excellent!

Offline Randy

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2005, 11:53:23 AM »
I live in a three red light town so our selection is small.

Offline buzz

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Re: Chicago Style Dough
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2005, 11:58:54 AM »
We should all send you a care package!


 

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