Author Topic: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?  (Read 5990 times)

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Offline andreguidon

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #25 on: July 13, 2011, 10:05:56 AM »
 :chef:
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Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #26 on: July 13, 2011, 10:14:44 AM »
Here we go lol. Creme Brulee is carmelized not charred. Food cooked on a grill has no relation to either pizza or CB. It is seared.

Well, from my point of view char is char, and food is food. So I guess we have come to an impasse in the conversation. I would counter that wood fired pizza and grilled food have a very common link - namely, fire - and that calling all the black stuff on seared/grilled food "sear" and not "char" is just semantics. But to each his/her own.

John

Offline Pizzamaster

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #27 on: July 13, 2011, 11:43:56 PM »
There's no impasse. Everyody has their own preferences. All I know is I want a T-Bone now.

Offline thezaman

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2011, 01:37:52 AM »
 how about charred pretzels these things are delicious.

Offline austintjones

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2011, 12:55:31 PM »
Honestly, I think it's a question of FLAVOR over appearance. I have had charred pizzas that taste bitter and upleasant, and I have had charred pizzas that taste brilliant. Bitter flavor can bring great balance to the sweetness of the crust and cheese, but when it is the resounding note, nobody is happy. Just my two cents!

Austin

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #30 on: July 19, 2011, 01:08:21 PM »
Honestly, I think it's a question of FLAVOR over appearance. I have had charred pizzas that taste bitter and upleasant, and I have had charred pizzas that taste brilliant. Bitter flavor can bring great balance to the sweetness of the crust and cheese, but when it is the resounding note, nobody is happy. Just my two cents!

Austin

Good point, but isn't flavor also subjective?  ???  Take sweet, salty, sour, spicy, bitter.  It's all relative to our own experiences. 

Has anyone had bitter melon soup? How about the durian fruit? How about any of the stinky cheeses out there? Disgusting or delicious?

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #31 on: July 19, 2011, 01:20:26 PM »
Good point, but isn't flavor also subjective?  ???  Take sweet, salty, sour, spicy, bitter.  It's all relative to our own experiences. 

Has anyone had bitter melon soup? How about the durian fruit? How about any of the stinky cheeses out there? Disgusting or delicious?

We were traveling on a bus in Indonesia, and one of the passengers started making a fuss about someone smuggling durian (no durian was allowed on the bus). He made the driver unload all the luggage, and sure enough they found a couple hidden durian. That fruit stinks. I had to try it about 10 times before I developed a taste for it. I still like it in ice cream.

CL
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Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #32 on: July 19, 2011, 02:18:08 PM »
Good point, but isn't flavor also subjective?  ???  Take sweet, salty, sour, spicy, bitter.  It's all relative to our own experiences.  

Has anyone had bitter melon soup? How about the durian fruit? How about any of the stinky cheeses out there? Disgusting or delicious?

The depth of char is also important....meaning the actual physical depth of the char in the crust. Some places the char is deeper in the crust and some have very dark spots....but those spots are as thin as bonito fish flake food allowing for bitterness without overpowering.

I've had the pleasure of tasting hundreds of cheeses in my life...and no small amount of them have been "stinky". Almost all of the odour is caused by the bacteria used and/or mold....and that smell is almost entirely contained in the rind of the cheese (which is usually not meant to be eaten for these cheeses). I have seen too many people cut into the cheese and immediately eat it (with the smell of the rind still in their noses).

The cheese inside often contains only a small amount of the gym sock component to it, if any at all....but a lot of great, intriguing flavors! "Stinky" Taleggio is great on pizza. And a nice wedge of Stilton or Roquefort paired with a glass of Sauternes is one of life's great pairing pleasures. Life without a fresh baguette, a wedge of "stinky" Camembert and a bottle of Sancerre (or a bottle of Cantillon Rose de Gambrinus beer...or other good framboise)? No "stinky" Limburger with a Belgian Lambic or Gueuze....or a smoked lager (rauchbier) from the Bamberg area of Germany? FUHGETTABOUTIT!
« Last Edit: July 19, 2011, 05:36:56 PM by pizzablogger »
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Offline chickenparm

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #33 on: July 19, 2011, 09:57:08 PM »
Most of my extra well done pies that have some char,you cannot even taste anything "burnt".Yet the pie tastes so much better than my lighter,pale colored rimmed pies.

Believe,me I have burned some pizzas in my time,and I could taste the burnt flavor everywhere and tossed it out.Yet for some folks,there may be a fine line between a nice char and a burnt pizza.Its all subjective like the others posted.

For many of us,a good char is awesome.Its usually spotted,scattered and not everywhere to overwhelm the entire pie.
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Offline othafa9

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #34 on: July 19, 2011, 09:59:26 PM »
This reminds me of a customer we had last week:  "Excuse me, I just graduated from culinary school, and I think your oven is too hot".  Yeah, thanks bud.  Oh, and Pizzablogger, where is your site?

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #35 on: July 19, 2011, 10:05:17 PM »
This reminds me of a customer we had last week:  "Excuse me, I just graduated from culinary school, and I think your oven is too hot".  Yeah, thanks bud.  Oh, and Pizzablogger, where is your site?

In blog hell.

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Offline lilbuddypizza

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #36 on: July 19, 2011, 10:25:10 PM »
I may have stated this explanation before, but----
I live in Chicago. A lot of the pizza joints are either owned or worked by Hispanics. From what I understand with these great people, food is either cooked or not. What is this "well-done"? I have learned the phrase "bien cosido" for my burritos for this reason. Now understand that any good pizza place in Chicago will top a pizza with raw pork if sausage is ordered (and that's my regular). So, if I have a worker who is baking my pizza and to him "cooked" means cheese melted and crust firm, than chances are the sausage is close to raw, considering that it is under cheese and amid sauce. Or it may even be that the owner is worried about complaints of the pie being overcooked, so they pull it from the oven early. In either case, I'd like to have my pork fully cooked and my crust solid and crispy, if possible. Sometimes at some places, even well-well-done is not followed as ordered. I've told a place that I want it cooked long enough to have the cheese turn brown. So what they did is undercook my pizza(again) and then throw it under a broiler until my cheese was dark brown. I knew this by the fact that the dough was soft and barely cooked. It's a matter of safety, in a weird way, and also about flavor. Let the sausage(or other meat ingredient) blend with everything.My cheese pizzas are never well done though.
Another simpler reason is that growing up in the early 70's all South side pizza places cooked their pies to a medium to dark brown cheese bubbles on top. Those were always the best spots on the pie (and the corners too!). It's a matter of what one is used to.From north side to south side, from city to city, and coast to coast.

Offline texmex

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Re: Burnt Pizzas -why are people tolerant?
« Reply #37 on: July 24, 2011, 02:38:39 PM »
Without presque brűlé methods French cooking would have little aplomb.

Reesa


 

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