Author Topic: about getting the autolyse right  (Read 976 times)

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Offline Super Mario

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about getting the autolyse right
« on: July 20, 2011, 10:09:57 AM »
Hi,
I don't post often but I've kept reading posts regularly ever since I registered.  But anyhow...
Now, I don't remember exactly whereabout on this forum, but I recently fell upon a thread which mentionned extended autolyse periods.
I used to do a 20 minute autolyse with the salt already mixed in.  But from what I understand it is better to add the salt after the autolyse period, is that correct?
Coming back to the extended/prolonged autolyse I tried 2 batches with a 24h autolyse (flour + IDY + water) after that I added the sourdough and then another 24h rise. 
What I noticed is that the dough was much softer and stretchy.
What I would like to know is if there is anything such as too much autolyse?  Is 24h too much?
My concern is that it was very stretchy (which is good in my opinion) but maybe not elastic enough...   


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: about getting the autolyse right
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2011, 05:17:12 PM »
Super Mario,

What you describe appears to be a fermentation process rather than an autolyse process. You can read the description of autolysis from Professor Calvel's book as I excerpted it and posted it in Reply 14 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12278.msg116355/topicseen.html#msg116355. You might also read Reply 9 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2632.msg22856.html#msg22856, which does a nice job of explaining the autolyse process in its classic form and the reasons why salt and yeast are excluded from the autolyse rest period.

I have written before on the duration aspect of autolyse, including at Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8576.msg74242.html#msg74242 and at Reply 15 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3220.msg74624/topicseen.html#msg74624. However, those discussions are with respect to the classic autolyse, not a fermented dough as you appear to be describing.

Peter


 

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