Author Topic: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust  (Read 20914 times)

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Offline gully_foyle

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"Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« on: June 12, 2005, 02:27:05 PM »
I'm new here so please don't flame if this has been discussed ad infinitum.

When I was young (1970s-80s) there was a chain of pizza joints in Southern California named 'Numero Uno.' Their crust was delicious and was baked in an iron skillet, Chicago Style. I don't know if they still exist, if so they must be tremendously down-sized. Over the years I've developed a home-made dough version that comes close IMO but not close enough. I'd given up on updating my recipe until recently, when I took my family to BJ's Bar and Grill in Folsom, CA, where lo-and-behold their pizza crust tasted virtually exactly the same as the old Numero Uno crust. It made me wonder if they used the same recipe. I did some research on BJ's and they are an up-and-coming popular chain that started out as a Chicago Style pizzeria.

My question is:

Does anybody have an authentic 'Numero Uno' dough recipe, or the newer (if different) BJ's dough recipe?


Offline jordanzimmerman

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Re: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2005, 06:41:25 PM »
I posted this in another thread, but I'll repost it here:

FYI - Cooks Illustrated has a foccacia style recipe that is very similar to Numero Uno's pizza. I've made it several times. It's the "Deep-Dish Pizza" recipe from Sept. 1999. I don't feel comfortable posting their recipe, but it is available for subscribers to their website. http://www.cooksillustrated.com/

An interesting note: they use a potato in the dough! Also, no corn meal. Just like Numero Uno, there is no tomato sauce. Only canned tomatoes. For my tastes, this beats any Chicago Deep Dish recipe.
Jordan Zimmerman
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Offline buzz

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Re: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2005, 09:13:27 AM »
Cook's Illustrated also runs America's Test Kitchen--in one of their cookbooks (ATK) they give their version of deep dish pizza. If I recall, they did recommend using potato in the dough to keep it moist, plus loading the pan with (I think) half a cup of olive oil.

Personally, I don't think I'd want potato in my pizza, but all that oil would probably fry the dough--especially if you cooked it in an iron skillet. Connie's came out with an iron skillet  fried pizza a couple of years ago--don't know if they still have it, though.

Offline Randy

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Re: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2005, 10:54:39 AM »
The potato flour of even using instant potato flakes or water from boiled potatoes all have been used in baking for quite some time.  The flavor is not detectable but it will moisten the crumb of the bread or crust.  It is the moistness that helps bread stay fresher longer.
I use potato flour in my cinnamon rolls but have not tried it in pizza.

Randy

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2005, 12:45:17 PM »
A while back, one of our members, jeancarlo, who recently opened a pizzeria in El Grullo, Mexico, asked for advice on par-baking of crusts. I provided him with the following excerpts (in italics) from materials written by Tom Lehmann:

Potato flour has been used successfully in pizza crust production, especially par-baked thick crusts to help improve the overall quality of the par-baked crust. It also imparts some crust color so you will most likely need to reduce the sugar level a little when using potato flour. As to the amount of potato flour to use, I'd go with 5% of the flour weight and also increase the dough absorption by about 4% at the same time. (Pete-zza's note: I assume increasing the dough absorption means increasing the hydration by 4%.)

I think one of the best deep-dish crusts that I've ever had is a par-baked crust…..I made my dough with 10% potato flour in it. I had to increase the dough absorption by almost 8% to compensate for the drying effect of the potato flour. I then pan proofed the dough for 45 to 60 minutes at room temperature. I then par-baked the dough/crust at 400 F in a deck type oven. The baking time was approximately 5 minutes. Just bake the crusts until they're set, but not browned. On the following day, I dressed the crusts and baked them at 450 F for about 18 minutes. The finished crusts were extremely tender eating, some here at the AIB say they eat like cotton candy. That's my take on it, you may or may not like that kind of crust. A little experimenting should give you the crust characteristics that you are looking for.

Jeancarlo subsequently asked whether it was possible to use potato flakes (the type sold in supermarkets) rather than potato flour. The answer I gave him after researched the matter was as follows (also in italics):

If you can get potato flour that would be better. You might be able to use the dehydrated potato flakes that are sold in supermarkets and used to make mashed potatoes, but one of the problems with those products is that they usually include sodium bisulfite. The sodium bisulfite is used to prevent browning. However, in a dough it slows down the yeast activity. If you decide to use the dehydrated flakes anyway, you might try adding a bit more yeast to compensate for the slower yeast activity. If you find you need a bit more color in the crust, which the potato flour would do, you might add a bit of sugar to your recipe or increase it a bit if your recipe already has it. You might also give some thought to pulverizing the potato flakes if you use them, to get them in a finer, maybe more usable form. I would use a food processor. I don't know if that will help or hurt, but it might be worth trying as a simple experiment. Maybe you can try it both ways.

Peter


Offline buzz

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Re: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2005, 09:48:16 AM »
America's Test Kitchen was not recommending potato flour, but , as I recall, actual potatoes! Plus all that oil in the pan--didn't sound too appetizing to me!

Offline jordanzimmerman

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Re: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2005, 01:11:43 PM »
Yes, it's one boiled potato. Their reasoning is that many focaccia breads have this (I don't know if that's true).

Also, yes, you add 2 tablespoons of oil into the bottom of the pan. You also pre-bake the dough before adding toppings. As a lifelong lover of Numero Uno's pizza I can tell you that this is the closest I've had to their pizza outside of the restaurant. I've made the recipe many times and it's absolutely delicioso.
Jordan Zimmerman
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Offline pizzaman42

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Re: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2006, 05:12:34 PM »

Heres the skinny from THE pizzaman, there is no potatoe in Numero Uno's dough,nobody I know has been able to duplicate it including many vendors we have tried. The product is now made to our specs by Rich's products out of Buffalo,NY It's not rocket science but we do hold the receipe close.
Mark Doskocil
V.P.
Numero Uno Pizza ::)

Offline jordanzimmerman

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Re: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2006, 07:39:16 PM »
Mark Doskocil
V.P.
Numero Uno Pizza ::)


Woa! So, what's up with Numero Uno? I live in Monterey and we don't have any here. It's still my favorite pizza of all time. There is nothing like it anywhere.

FYI - here are pics of my ersatz Numero Uno pies: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2014.msg17782.html
« Last Edit: September 26, 2006, 07:50:47 PM by jordanzimmerman »
Jordan Zimmerman
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Offline anthony2173

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Re: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2006, 03:02:34 AM »
It just so happens that I live in the same town and have a family member that works at BJ's. I'm told that the pizza dough is BJ's own recipe delivered frozen and shaped into the appropriate size.

One of the kitchen staff said the dough uses vegetable shortening. I can't verify this but since they had no idea why I was asking there was no reason to be deceptive.

gully_foyle, if you plan on trying your hand at Chicago Style and need 6-in-1 tomatoes please look me up. I have about 42 of their 28oz cans (one case still sealed) but have since starting using the Stanislaus Full Red for my pizza. I know getting food products from strangers is odd but once you catch the pizza making bug it will seem pretty normal. Heck, I would probably drive two hours to split a 50 pound bag of Caputo with someone on this board.

If I spent this much time researching my investments I would be retired by now.


Offline Red October

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Re: "Numero Uno" Style Dough and BJ's Pizza Crust
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2007, 04:11:47 PM »
Come on, SOMEBODY has to have a recipe that is at least close to BJ's or Numero Uno's!  Don't be the pizza dough Nazi, share it with us!   ;D  We're hungry!!!!


 

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