Author Topic: Could cooking food that gives off a LOT of moisture damage a WFO?  (Read 647 times)

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Offline RobynB

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Thinking ahead to tomato season and also thinking about residual heat in the WFO and how to use it has brought up a question.  Every year, I slow-roast and then vacuum-seal and freeze tomatoes.  I don't mean a few:  last year I did ~80 lbs and this year I plan to do more than that.  In the conventional oven, I usually have 3 half-sheets at a time at 225F for 12-14 hours for each batch, give or take a bit.  I was thinking that I could try to adapt that to do in the WFO using residual heat the day after a fire, but then started thinking about how much liquid is evaporated from the tomatoes and wondered if that would adversely affect the WFO.  I mean, the process of curing is removing moisture so it won't crack, right?  Therefore, adding massive quantities of steam to the inside seems like it might be bad.  And if I'm using residual heat, there's no fire to dry things and the door is shut, so it could get awfully humid in there, to the point of standing water.  Has anyone done anything similar?  Thoughts?  It might just be a bad idea...  :-\


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Could cooking food that gives off a LOT of moisture damage a WFO?
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2011, 04:17:58 PM »
Therefore, adding massive quantities of steam to the inside seems like it might be bad.  And if I'm using residual heat, there's no fire to dry things and the door is shut, so it could get awfully humid in there, to the point of standing water. 


I cook all kinds of things with the residual heat. You are correct that it can get very humid, so I often leave the hatch slightly ajar. When baking bread, I often inject steam into the oven. Never had a problem.   

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Could cooking food that gives off a LOT of moisture damage a WFO?
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2011, 04:20:34 PM »
I don't know why you would want to. You're trying to drive off the water out of the tomoates, right? Home ovens are designed to vent out moisture quickly. That seems like the right tool for the job.

CL
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.


 

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