Author Topic: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA  (Read 82539 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #600 on: November 08, 2011, 09:51:51 PM »
Norma
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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #601 on: November 08, 2011, 09:53:25 PM »
Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #602 on: November 08, 2011, 09:54:51 PM »
Norma
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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #603 on: November 08, 2011, 09:55:53 PM »
Norma
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Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #604 on: November 09, 2011, 01:42:47 AM »
Norma, that looks like a pizza slice that I would love to eat.   :chef:
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Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #605 on: November 09, 2011, 03:51:33 AM »
Norma,

Excellent stuff and that's a great looking pie!

The Power flour does provide great texture, structure and crunch but lacks in the browning department compared to what we've seen in the Luigi video. I don't know why that is but my hunch is that Diners & Drives may have left out some crucial info, especially when I tested the same dough in my pizza guy's oven, which runs at the same temps Luigi claims to run his at.

If Luigi really uses only a 24 hr cold fermentation and the PPF, I don't think there's a chance that he can get his pies looking like they did in the video. In other words, something's amiss here. I think we need to take another look at the formula...

I'll look through some of my older posts where I had the same problems with browning just to see what can be done. I hope that Peter might come up with an ingenious suggestion in the meantime  ;D

My bet is to increase the sugar amount but that might not always be the cure.
Mike

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Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #606 on: November 09, 2011, 07:35:24 AM »
Norma, that looks like a pizza slice that I would love to eat.   :chef:

Gene,

Thanks for saying that is a pizza slice that you would love to eat.  :) The Luigi's clone attempt in the taste of the pizza went well.  The color of the bottom crust, I am not too sure about.  I didn't even get to try a second slice.  :(  :-D

Thanks for your help in this thread!  ;D

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #607 on: November 09, 2011, 07:56:23 AM »
Norma,

Excellent stuff and that's a great looking pie!

The Power flour does provide great texture, structure and crunch but lacks in the browning department compared to what we've seen in the Luigi video. I don't know why that is but my hunch is that Diners & Drives may have left out some crucial info, especially when I tested the same dough in my pizza guy's oven, which runs at the same temps Luigi claims to run his at.

If Luigi really uses only a 24 hr cold fermentation and the PPF, I don't think there's a chance that he can get his pies looking like they did in the video. In other words, something's amiss here. I think we need to take another look at the formula...

I'll look through some of my older posts where I had the same problems with browning just to see what can be done. I hope that Peter might come up with an ingenious suggestion in the meantime  ;D

My bet is to increase the sugar amount but that might not always be the cure.


Mike,

Thanks for you kind comments!  :)

I think the Power flour produced a dough that had a good balance between extensibility and elasticity.  The dough had some bubbles in the dough when stretching the skin and it also felt just about right.  The crunch in the final pizza seemed good to me.  I donít run my deck oven as high as Luigiís does, and donít know if that would have made the crust color better or not.  I tried to follow all the directions carefully, but canít up my oven temperature just to test one pie when I am trying to make regular pizzas. 

I know you also had problems with the browning issues and donít know if we can solve that or not.  Maybe an increase in the sugar can solve those problems.

I wanted to ask you a question as whether your flour had the same clumps in the flour?  I did give some Power flour to Steve yesterday, and showed him how the Power flour didnít seem to be silky.  The other flour Alex sent me the sample of wasnít like that. I donít know if my Power flour is older or might have picked up some moisture. Steve said maybe I should have sifted the flour, but I told him I wanted to try it out the way it was sent to me.  I know by sifting flour, it can sometimes can absorb more water, but that didnít seem to be a problem of the Power Flour and absorbing water, in the Luigi's clone attempt.  That part went well.

I wish I could purchase the Power flour in my area.  You are lucky to have access to Power Flour.  ;D  So far I really like the Power flour.

Norma 
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #608 on: November 09, 2011, 10:25:33 AM »
Mike,

The Luigi clone dough formulation and related instructions I gave to Norma were calculated to see if she could coax enough sugar out of the dough over only a one-day cold ferment to provide more crust color. I was also concerned about her oven and its impact on crust coloration because I knew that she could not use it just for the Luigi clone, at least not on the day that she makes her regular pizza at market.

After seeing Norma's results using her deck oven to make Luigi clones, my first instinct is to increase the amount of sugar, especially in your case where you are using a standard home oven. By contrast, Norma perhaps still has the option of increasing the bake time with her deck oven, using the lower oven temperature, even if it means having to use a pizza screen to keep the bottom of the crust from burning while the top of the crust gets more browning.

You might recall that in the Luigi video at about the only dough ingredient that we could not find in a small bowl, even after all of the slicing and dicing of the video, was the sugar. Luigi only said that he used a "little" sugar. What he showed going into the mixer bowl looked to be more than just a "little" sugar but there was no way of knowing for sure. Maybe the part of the video that dealt with the sugar in more detail ended up on the cutting room floor. When I looked at the video again today after not having seen it in some time, I thought that the video was a real mess production-wise.

In your case, you might increase the amount of sugar (table sugar). A good starting point might be to use 2% to see if that results in improved crust color. The yeast can only consume simple sugars, which means that table sugar, which is a disaccharide, has to be converted to simple sugars (fructose and glucose) before the yeast can feed off of them. That conversion can take some time but hopefully should allow enough residual sugar at the time of baking (about a day later) to give more color. If that doesn't work, or work sufficiently, then it might mean having to lower the amount of yeast the next time so that the yeast doesn't consume too much of the table sugar (the simple sugars) and rely more on the simple sugars extracted from the starch in the flour by enzyme performance. At 2% sugar, you should not detect it as sweetness in the finished crust and it should not materially result in a more tender crust (although that might be a beneficial side effect in a very thin crust). So, the sugar's main function is to provide more crust color.

Norma might also try using more sugar, even if she decides to use her normal oven temperature--the one she uses to make her regular preferment Lehmann dough. Otherwise, she might just try a longer bake and closely monitor the bottom crust browning. She might even be able to make two pizzas for comparison purposes, one with sugar and one without.

Peter


Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #609 on: November 09, 2011, 11:55:00 AM »


I wanted to ask you a question as whether your flour had the same clumps in the flour? 

Norma,

Mine didn't have any lumps in it at all. My hunch is that the sample you got is either an older one or it got wet at some point. I'd just sift the lumps out. But I'm glad you like the flour so far. I love that stuff  :)
Mike

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #610 on: November 09, 2011, 12:00:03 PM »
Mike,

The Luigi clone dough formulation and related instructions I gave to Norma were calculated to see if she could coax enough sugar out of the dough over only a one-day cold ferment to provide more crust color. I was also concerned about her oven and its impact on crust coloration because I knew that she could not use it just for the Luigi clone, at least not on the day that she makes her regular pizza at market.

After seeing Norma's results using her deck oven to make Luigi clones, my first instinct is to increase the amount of sugar, especially in your case where you are using a standard home oven. By contrast, Norma perhaps still has the option of increasing the bake time with her deck oven, using the lower oven temperature, even if it means having to use a pizza screen to keep the bottom of the crust from burning while the top of the crust gets more browning.

You might recall that in the Luigi video at about the only dough ingredient that we could not find in a small bowl, even after all of the slicing and dicing of the video, was the sugar. Luigi only said that he used a "little" sugar. What he showed going into the mixer bowl looked to be more than just a "little" sugar but there was no way of knowing for sure. Maybe the part of the video that dealt with the sugar in more detail ended up on the cutting room floor. When I looked at the video again today after not having seen it in some time, I thought that the video was a real mess production-wise.

In your case, you might increase the amount of sugar (table sugar). A good starting point might be to use 2% to see if that results in improved crust color. The yeast can only consume simple sugars, which means that table sugar, which is a disaccharide, has to be converted to simple sugars (fructose and glucose) before the yeast can feed off of them. That conversion can take some time but hopefully should allow enough residual sugar at the time of baking (about a day later) to give more color. If that doesn't work, or work sufficiently, then it might mean having to lower the amount of yeast the next time so that the yeast doesn't consume too much of the table sugar (the simple sugars) and rely more on the simple sugars extracted from the starch in the flour by enzyme performance. At 2% sugar, you should not detect it as sweetness in the finished crust and it should not materially result in a more tender crust (although that might be a beneficial side effect in a very thin crust). So, the sugar's main function is to provide more crust color.

Norma might also try using more sugar, even if she decides to use her normal oven temperature--the one she uses to make her regular preferment Lehmann dough. Otherwise, she might just try a longer bake and closely monitor the bottom crust browning. She might even be able to make two pizzas for comparison purposes, one with sugar and one without.

Peter

Peter,

That makes sense.

However, I have tried the clones a few times now and the outcome was mostly the same regardless of the hearth I used (steel or stone). I'll give the 2% sugar a shot and see what happens, probably over the weekend.

I still think that something's missing in the video or at the very least, the entire dough info is somewhat blurry. I agree with you that some info could have ended up not being used.
Mike

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Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #611 on: November 09, 2011, 01:29:08 PM »


Norma might also try using more sugar, even if she decides to use her normal oven temperature--the one she uses to make her regular preferment Lehmann dough. Otherwise, she might just try a longer bake and closely monitor the bottom crust browning. She might even be able to make two pizzas for comparison purposes, one with sugar and one without.

Peter

Peter,

I will do both experiments next week.  Do you suggest I also try 2% sugar in the formula for the one experiment like Mike is going to try? 

I also wonder what might have been cut out of the video, as Mike and you suggested.

Since I never have tasted a real Luigi's pie, I still don't know if any of mine are like the real Luigi's pizza, but I would sell a pie like the one I made yesterday.  It was really good.  :)  Thanks, for setting-forth the formula and methods to try. 

I thought I had taken a picture of the top of the dough ball right before I opened it, but somehow i didn't.  The top of the dough ball did start to have a bubble forming on it.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #612 on: November 09, 2011, 01:33:00 PM »
Norma,

Mine didn't have any lumps in it at all. My hunch is that the sample you got is either an older one or it got wet at some point. I'd just sift the lumps out. But I'm glad you like the flour so far. I love that stuff  :)

Mike,

Thanks for telling me your Power Flour didn't have any lumps in it.  You are probably right that my sample was probably older or had moisture at some point.  I will sift the flour the next time I use it.  I didn't think the Power flour should have looked clumpy.

Good luck with your next Luigi's attempt!  :)

Norma
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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #613 on: November 09, 2011, 02:00:16 PM »
Additional sugar might give you the browning you're looking for, but so might a lower hydration.  I'm still not giving up on the idea that Luigi's might be working with 63% hydration.

The benefit of lowering the water vs. increasing the sugar is additional crispiness.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #614 on: November 09, 2011, 02:03:41 PM »
I will do both experiments next week.  Do you suggest I also try 2% sugar in the formula for the one experiment like Mike is going to try? 

Norma,

Yes, I think that 2% sugar should be a good starting point. It is always difficult when you are trying a new pizza dough to get it just right when baked in a given oven. If you had a pizzeria and made hundreds of pizzas over the course of a week, as I imagine Luigi does, you would eventually become an expert in both making the dough and pizzas and finding the best bake protocol for your given oven. I would imagine you discovered that with your preferment Lehmann dough even though you only use it one day a week at market.

Peter

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #615 on: November 09, 2011, 02:42:34 PM »
Additional sugar might give you the browning you're looking for, but so might a lower hydration.  I'm still not giving up on the idea that Luigi's might be working with 63% hydration.

The benefit of lowering the water vs. increasing the sugar is additional crispiness.

Scott,

You might be right about the lowering the water vs. increasing the sugar for additional crispness.  :) There is lot to think about when formulating any formula.  The crispness on the attempt I did yesterday seemed okay to the taste testers and me, but I am not sure how a real Luigi's pie is when eaten fresh out of his oven.  Only someone that has eaten a fresh pie from Luigi's would know that.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #616 on: November 09, 2011, 02:54:27 PM »
Norma,

Yes, I think that 2% sugar should be a good starting point. It is always difficult when you are trying a new pizza dough to get it just right when baked in a given oven. If you had a pizzeria and made hundreds of pizzas over the course of a week, as I imagine Luigi does, you would eventually become an expert in both making the dough and pizzas and finding the best bake protocol for your given oven. I would imagine you discovered that with your preferment Lehmann dough even though you only use it one day a week at market.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for telling me 2% sugar would be a good staring point to try for better crust coloration.

Luigi did work for Bronx and other pizzerias before, so he would know much more than I do about dough making, formulations, fermentation, (and what works and doesnĎt work) and finding the best bake protocol for a given oven. 

I know I have tried many experiments in the deck oven and at home.  Each one has its own set of challenges.  It did take me a long while to eventually get my preferment Lehmann dough to where the fermentation of the preferment, bake temperatures, water temperatures, and everything else fit together.  At least that is behind me now.  :-D

Norma
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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #617 on: November 09, 2011, 11:48:06 PM »
Mike,

Thanks for telling me your Power Flour didn't have any lumps in it.  You are probably right that my sample was probably older or had moisture at some point.  I will sift the flour the next time I use it.  I didn't think the Power flour should have looked clumpy.

Good luck with your next Luigi's attempt!  :)

Norma

Norma,

If the guy you got the Power Flour from has one bag, he most likely will have access to more.

Ask him for a fresh one, ideally a 50lb bag. I know that Pendleton has milling facilities in Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama (Milner Milling) if I'm not mistaken, which should serve the broader East Coast.

Maybe mention Milner Milling's Power flour and see what he says.

Thanks for the good luck wishes. :). I'll report back on that one.
Mike

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #618 on: November 10, 2011, 09:52:15 AM »
Norma,

If the guy you got the Power Flour from has one bag, he most likely will have access to more.

Ask him for a fresh one, ideally a 50lb bag. I know that Pendleton has milling facilities in Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama (Milner Milling) if I'm not mistaken, which should serve the broader East Coast.

Maybe mention Milner Milling's Power flour and see what he says.

Thanks for the good luck wishes. :). I'll report back on that one.

Mike,

Alex is the person that answered me back from PFM.  He was trying to find me a distributor in my area, but just sent me a sample to try.  I did call all my local distributors, even Sysco (Alex said Sysco does carry Power Flour), and none of them carry the Power Flour in my area.  I am not sure about the Phila. area, but that is too far for me to go to buy a 50 lb. bag of Power Flour.  I canít ask Alex for a 50 lb. bag for a sample.  :-D  I was lucky I did get the sample to try.

Thanks for you help in trying to find me 50 lb. bags of Power Flour.  :)

Norma
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Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #619 on: November 11, 2011, 05:19:19 PM »
Question about the sauce.  I have been following this thread but may have missed something.  I think Mike (Essen) added some water to the sauce he was making, maybe to make it thinner but that was early on in this reverse engineering project.  Could someone tell me water should still be added?  I read Peter's sauce post here and did not see any water added but I might have missed later on if it should be added and there are so many post here it's hard for me to find.  Thanks much.

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #620 on: November 12, 2011, 08:44:27 AM »
Question about the sauce.  I have been following this thread but may have missed something.  I think Mike (Essen) added some water to the sauce he was making, maybe to make it thinner but that was early on in this reverse engineering project.  Could someone tell me water should still be added?  I read Peter's sauce post here and did not see any water added but I might have missed later on if it should be added and there are so many post here it's hard for me to find.  Thanks much.

James,

If you are looking where Peter posted the amounts of ingredients to add to the 7/11 Ground Tomatoes, I they are at 
Reply 228
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14928.msg152091.html#msg152091

Peter converted ingredients to volume measurements.
Reply 437 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14928.msg153861.html#msg153861

Where Mike made the sauce with the amounts of ingredients at Reply 322
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14928.msg152728.html#msg152728
After Mike gave the thumbs up to Peter he made this post.
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14928.msg153103.html#msg153103

Where Peter mentions about the possibility of Luigi thinning the sauce is at Reply 342
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14928.msg152873.html#msg152873

Where Mike posted he used at Reply 504
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14928.msg154647.html#msg154647

Gene posted where is added water to Full Red with the ingredients at Reply 514
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14928.msg155469.html#msg155469

Norma
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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #621 on: November 12, 2011, 12:53:11 PM »
Norma, thank you so much for the links to the sauce posts.  I didn't use 7/11 or 6 in 1 tomatoes or Full Red but used Classico Crushed Tomato in Puree.  It turned out a bit thick so after reading Gene's post I decided to add some water to thin it down some.  It taste very good.  I have to re-read the post carefully when I make sauce next time just so I understand it fully.  Not sure how good of job I did this time but it's good nevertheless.

As Peter mentions in his post there is nothing in the video showing that Luigi thins out his sauce but from eating there last Summer it seemed the sauce is fairly thin.  It is possible that they just didn't show that part of the process of making the sauce.  Maybe Luigi didn't want the whole cat out of the bag if you get what I am saying. 
« Last Edit: November 12, 2011, 01:36:43 PM by PizzaEater101 »

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #622 on: November 12, 2011, 02:39:06 PM »
Got my 25# bag of Power Flour last night!

The attached picture is of the below recipe with the sugar at 2% and the ball of the left at 63% hydration and the one on the right a 65%. Neither were sticky at the least and least almost 0% bowl residual. I will be baking tomorrow after a 24 hours cold ferment
It is amazing that is flour can adsorb 65% so easily without being sticky and slack. It is like it is begging for more water.

Question: I used IDY, instead of ADY and reduced the amount by 25%, does that sound about right?


Norma,

Since Jet_deck (Gene) informed us at Reply 91 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14928.msg151218/topicseen.html#msg151218 that Luigi's cold ferments its dough for 24 hours, I'd like to see you attempt a 24-hour cold fermented Luigi's clone dough. For this purpose, I would use the Luigi #1 clone dough formulation as set forth at Reply 177 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14928.msg151870.html#msg151870 but modified to reduce the amount of yeast to a value that I believe should work for a one-day cold fermented dough in your part of Pennsylvania this time of year. Using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, this is what I get:

Luigi One-Day Cold Fermentation Clone Dough Formulation (Modified #1 Luigi)
Pendleton Power High-Gluten Flour, Unbleached (100%):
Water (Crystal Geyser Spring Water) (65%):
ADY (0.55%):
Salt (1.984%):
Sugar (0.22928%):
Total (167.76328%):
308.74 g  |  10.89 oz | 0.68 lbs
200.68 g  |  7.08 oz | 0.44 lbs
1.7 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.45 tsp | 0.15 tbsp
6.13 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.1 tsp | 0.37 tbsp
0.71 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.18 tsp | 0.06 tbsp
517.95 g | 18.27 oz | 1.14 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: Dough is for a single 18" pizza; bowl residue compensation = 1.5%

In terms of the dough preparation, I would like you to try to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 80 degrees F. Also, before refrigerating, I suggest that you let the dough rest for about 20-30 minutes. That period would be about what it might take workers at Luigi's to take a large dough batch and divide and scale it into a large number of dough balls before putting them into the cooler. The rest period should also enable the dough ball to get some fermentation going before refrigerating. The objective is to get sufficient fermentation and to have an amount of sugar (residual sugar) left over beyond what the yeast needs as food to be available at the time of baking for final crust coloration. You will have to monitor the temper time at market to be sure that the dough isn't either underproofed or overproofed.

In the above formulation, the salt is regular table salt, which is what I assumed when I came up with the original Luigi clone dough formulations. If you prefer to use Kosher salt, then you may have to redo the above dough formulation to use the Kosher salt.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 12, 2011, 03:22:34 PM by scottserena »

Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #623 on: November 12, 2011, 02:45:06 PM »
Norma, thank you so much for the links to the sauce posts.  I didn't use 7/11 or 6 in 1 tomatoes or Full Red but used Classico Crushed Tomato in Puree.  It turned out a bit thick so after reading Gene's post I decided to add some water to thin it down some.  It taste very good.  I have to re-read the post carefully when I make sauce next time just so I understand it fully.  Not sure how good of job I did this time but it's good nevertheless.

As Peter mentions in his post there is nothing in the video showing that Luigi thins out his sauce but from eating there last Summer it seemed the sauce is fairly thin.  It is possible that they just didn't show that part of the process of making the sauce.  Maybe Luigi didn't want the whole cat out of the bag if you get what I am saying. 

James,

The Classico Crushed Tomatoes should make a good sauce, with the added ingredients Peter figured out.  There is always the option of thinning the sauce down like you did.  Each person has their own preferences for how they like their sauces for pizza.  Since you did eat pizza at Luigiís, you should know how their sauce looked on their pizzas.  Other members on this thread think everything wasnít on the DDD video at LuigiĎs.  I also agree.

Norma
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Offline PizzaEater101

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #624 on: November 13, 2011, 11:33:10 AM »
James,

The Classico Crushed Tomatoes should make a good sauce, with the added ingredients Peter figured out.  There is always the option of thinning the sauce down like you did.  Each person has their own preferences for how they like their sauces for pizza.  Since you did eat pizza at Luigiís, you should know how their sauce looked on their pizzas.  Other members on this thread think everything wasnít on the DDD video at LuigiĎs.  I also agree.

Norma

Hi Norma, I followed Peter's formula that he posted here with the added ingredients that he figured out, I did it for a 28 oz can of Classico Crushed Tomatoes.   I wanted to thin it out a bit so what I did was I added water but instead of by weight I just added by volume.  I added tablespoon by tablespoon until I felt the consistency was how I preferred it.  After 10 tablespoons it was really right for my preference.  I could have added a couple more for a total of 12 and I think it would have turned out just fine too but 10 tablespoons of water for the 28 oz of sauce was perfect for me.  In the past I have tried to water down sauce and put too much water and ruined it.  This time I did it right.

San Diego might be only a two hour drive without traffic but in the case when I went in summer it took maybe 3 hours or more to get there due to traffic but I don't go there much.  I will go next summer and try out Luigi again.  When I tried it it seemed that the sauce was fairly thin.

By the way my wife's brother had a party for his 2 year old.  He had the idea to bring his propane grill to the rec center in the park near his home and do a pizza party.  He had a bunch of ingredients and he bought dough from an Italian restaurant.  He had an assembly line to make pizza, or have the kids and adults make pizza.  Understandable the party goers have no experience with pizza making so not one person made a good pizza.  Since I have years of experience and learned a lot here at the forum I decided to bring my own stuff and make pizza.  I used a formulation from this discussion, the one similar to the one you used in your latest effort, I used my own sauce that I made from the Classico too.  Even tho my finger is still messed up and not healed yet I am finding that I can work around my finger.  The grill had only enough real estate to make a 12 inch, not a real NY 18 incher but for what it was the pizza turned out great.  Due to lack of a perfect baking setup the top did not get as done as I would like but I can say with the dough formulation that you guys figured out and the sauce it did turn out excellent.  I wish I had pics but I don't.  Forgot the camera but maybe someone at the party had taken pics, not sure.