Author Topic: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA  (Read 65037 times)

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Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #160 on: September 02, 2011, 12:16:07 PM »

I personally think that there is more than one size flour bag shown in the video.

I agree that it isn't really that important what size they are, but I wanted to put my last .02 in on the matter.  I contend that the lonely single bag under the table is a 25 or a 32# bag.  In another sequence the storage table is full of 50# bags.  The lonely small bag is the one that ends up being used at the mixer.  I say that they do use 50# bags for the mixer and make two 25# flour batches from a single bag. 

The video is so out of sequence.  For example the top of the flour sack is seen on the table next to the salt bowls.  When Guy starts talking about gluten is when Luigi is just starting to tear the bag.  I'm still trying to get some power flour.
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Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #161 on: September 02, 2011, 12:44:19 PM »
Peter,

Is that the same bucket with the sauce in it that Luigi uses to pour the water in? It looks like it has the same rim, the same indentations on the side of the rim, too. but the sauce bucket has some measurements on it.

If it's the same one, take a look at the screen capture where Luigi pours the water in. I enhanced it a bit but it looks like the water is almost at the rim and he keeps pouring. I can't really make out the numbers on the bucket but maybe someone else can...

Mike

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #162 on: September 02, 2011, 12:48:40 PM »
I don't know if they are. However, I think the ones used for the salt and oregano are the same size. Look at Luigi's hands. You'll see it's not a smallish bowl and he holds it with two hands.

I also measured mine: 6" diam. x 1.75" height. The bottom is 3.75" diam. if that matters.

Mike,

I thought that the bowls on the table to the left of the mixer were smaller than the ones used to make the sauce. However, I concluded that camera angles and distance from the objects might make it difficult to compare sizes and dimensions and maybe even distort some of the values. So, I decided that we needed a better system. I think I found it.

This is what I did. I went to a local supermarket and purchased a one-gallon jug of Crystal Geyser spring water. You will note that the water jug, the cap and the bowls appear simultaneously in several frames of the video, especially the cap and the bowls. I measured the width of one side of the water jug and it is 5". In fact, all sides are 5". The cap is 1.5" in diameter. I then went to several frames in the video (I would say at least six or seven frames) where the water jug, cap and bowls appeared (there were a lot more frames where both the cap and bowls were together) and, using the zoom feature of my computer, I blew up the images by 400%. I then took measurements off of my monitor, calculated certain ratios, and using the actual values for the water jug and cap, I concluded that the measuring bowls on the table were 5" in diameter (4.999999+", to be exact). I got the best set of numbers using the bottle cap and the bowls rather than the water jug itself and the bowls. There were fewer joint appearances of the water jug and the bowls and, while the sides of the jug are square, the corners are rounded. So, I wasn't sure that I got the best measurements for the water jug. Also, the cap and bowls were often right next to each other.

I then decided to go through the same exercise as discussed above but with the bottle cap, a bowl and the mixer all in the same frame. I wanted to see if I could determine the size of the mixer bowl. A good frame for this purpose is the one at 1:42. From my measurements from that frame, I calculated a diameter of 21.56". The diameter of a Hobart 80-quart mixer is 21 11/16". However, I couldn't get a good reading of the height of the mixer bowl to confirm the bowl size. So, while I would tend to guess that Luigi is using a Hobart mixer with an 80-cup mixer bowl, I am open to a better answer.

The measuring container that I was using to weigh items is about 4" in diameter. As time went on and I learned more about what was actually happening in the video, I could see that my numbers were on the low side. I plan to wrap a ring of cardboard around my container to increase it to 5" in diameter and re-do my weighings. I know my new weighings should be better even if they aren't perfect. I am trying to just get into the ballpark.

In your case, Mike, it looks like your bowl is of a good enough shape to do some weighings but you may want to mark off the 5" mark if you agree with my analysis. When I saw your photos next to the ones with Guy, I suspected that your numbers couldn't be right because you were wearing a different shirt than Guy :-D.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 02, 2011, 01:06:34 PM by Pete-zza »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #163 on: September 02, 2011, 01:13:11 PM »
I agree that it isn't really that important what size they are, but I wanted to put my last .02 in on the matter.  I contend that the lonely single bag under the table is a 25 or a 32# bag.  In another sequence the storage table is full of 50# bags.  The lonely small bag is the one that ends up being used at the mixer.  I say that they do use 50# bags for the mixer and make two 25# flour batches from a single bag. 

The video is so out of sequence.  For example the top of the flour sack is seen on the table next to the salt bowls.  When Guy starts talking about gluten is when Luigi is just starting to tear the bag.  I'm still trying to get some power flour.

Gene,

Your explanation is as plausible as any other I have seen in this thread. I will give you at least $.25 to keep posting at a 2 cent level.

I also agree with you, and with Mike and Norma, that there are a lot of things in the video that are out of order. I saw it in the way that things appeared and disappeared from the table next to the mixer and in the times on the clock on the wall.

Peter

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #164 on: September 02, 2011, 01:31:11 PM »
Is that the same bucket with the sauce in it that Luigi uses to pour the water in? It looks like it has the same rim, the same indentations on the side of the rim, too. but the sauce bucket has some measurements on it.

Mike,

I thought that the water container that first appears at 0:43 in the video ends up on the rack at 1:10. I was hoping to be able to determine the diameter of the container used to make the sauce to be able to determine the size of the bowls, such as the bowl shown, for example, at 4:17, but I couldn't read the markings to be able to get an idea as to the diameter of the sauce container.

Peter

Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #165 on: September 02, 2011, 02:25:52 PM »
Mike,

I thought that the water container that first appears at 0:43 in the video ends up on the rack at 1:10. I was hoping to be able to determine the diameter of the container used to make the sauce to be able to determine the size of the bowls, such as the bowl shown, for example, at 4:17, but I couldn't read the markings to be able to get an idea as to the diameter of the sauce container.

Peter

Peter,

After comparing the buckets again, I think the sauce bucket is bigger than the other one. Regarding the markings of the sauce bucket at 4:17 I think the first number on the left says 7.0L but it's tough to make out because there's some sauce splattered on from behind.

Mike

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #166 on: September 02, 2011, 02:26:53 PM »
Mike,

I thought that the bowls on the table to the left of the mixer were smaller than the ones used to make the sauce. However, I concluded that camera angles and distance from the objects might make it difficult to compare sizes and dimensions and maybe even distort some of the values. So, I decided that we needed a better system. I think I found it.

This is what I did. I went to a local supermarket and purchased a one-gallon jug of Crystal Geyser spring water. You will note that the water jug, the cap and the bowls appear simultaneously in several frames of the video, especially the cap and the bowls. I measured the width of one side of the water jug and it is 5". In fact, all sides are 5". The cap is 1.5" in diameter. I then went to several frames in the video (I would say at least six or seven frames) where the water jug, cap and bowls appeared (there were a lot more frames where both the cap and bowls were together) and, using the zoom feature of my computer, I blew up the images by 400%. I then took measurements off of my monitor, calculated certain ratios, and using the actual values for the water jug and cap, I concluded that the measuring bowls on the table were 5" in diameter (4.999999+", to be exact). I got the best set of numbers using the bottle cap and the bowls rather than the water jug itself and the bowls. There were fewer joint appearances of the water jug and the bowls and, while the sides of the jug are square, the corners are rounded. So, I wasn't sure that I got the best measurements for the water jug. Also, the cap and bowls were often right next to each other.

I then decided to go through the same exercise as discussed above but with the bottle cap, a bowl and the mixer all in the same frame. I wanted to see if I could determine the size of the mixer bowl. A good frame for this purpose is the one at 1:42. From my measurements from that frame, I calculated a diameter of 21.56". The diameter of a Hobart 80-quart mixer is 21 11/16". However, I couldn't get a good reading of the height of the mixer bowl to confirm the bowl size. So, while I would tend to guess that Luigi is using a Hobart mixer with an 80-cup mixer bowl, I am open to a better answer.

The measuring container that I was using to weigh items is about 4" in diameter. As time went on and I learned more about what was actually happening in the video, I could see that my numbers were on the low side. I plan to wrap a ring of cardboard around my container to increase it to 5" in diameter and re-do my weighings. I know my new weighings should be better even if they aren't perfect. I am trying to just get into the ballpark.

In your case, Mike, it looks like your bowl is of a good enough shape to do some weighings but you may want to mark off the 5" mark if you agree with my analysis. When I saw your photos next to the ones with Guy, I suspected that your numbers couldn't be right because you were wearing a different shirt than Guy :-D.

Peter

Peter,

Good stuff! You must have worked in a forensics lab before  ;D
Mike

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #167 on: September 02, 2011, 05:07:13 PM »
I'm still trying to get some power flour.

JD,

I'm sure you have a favorite pizza joint in your area. Do what I did and ask the pizza operator to order you a bag. My guy was extremely helpful and knowledgeable about different cheeses, flours, etc.

As a matter of fact, I just got back from paying him and will be picking the flour and cheese up this evening.
Mike

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #168 on: September 02, 2011, 05:09:29 PM »
All you guys,

I sure don’t know how this will help, but I did take pictures and measurements of where my 50 lb. bags of flour are stored, and also approximate measurements of one 50 lb. bag of KASL.  

The shelf were my flour is stored is 22” in width and 29 ¼” in length.  The approximate size of my 50 lb. bag of KASL (because it was full) was 28” in length and 18” in width.  I moved my bag of KASL around two ways.  

All of you guys are doing a great job trying to get this thread figured out!   ;D

Mike,  Thanks for telling me how you take pictures of frames.  That is great information to have!  :)

Norma
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Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #169 on: September 02, 2011, 05:32:48 PM »
All you guys,

I sure don’t know how this will help, but I did take pictures and measurements of where my 50 lb. bags of flour are stored, and also approximate measurements of one 50 lb. bag of KASL.  

The shelf were my flour is stored is 22” in width and 29 ¼” in length.  The approximate size of my 50 lb. bag of KASL (because it was full) was 28” in length and 18” in width.  I moved my bag of KASL around two ways.  

All of you guys are doing a great job trying to get this thread figured out!   ;D

Mike,  Thanks for telling me how you take pictures of frames.  That is great information to have!  :)

Norma

Norma,

I do think that the bags you see on the lower shelf of the table are the 50lb kind.

The GOM player is free to download. Try it out. It's great for slow-motion playback.
Mike

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #170 on: September 02, 2011, 05:39:24 PM »
Norma,

I do think that the bags you see on the lower shelf of the table are the 50lb kind.

The GOM player is free to download. Try it out. It's great for slow-motion playback.

Mike,

I probably will download the GOM player in a few days.  You really posted great frames from having the GOM player!  :) Those frames have helped this thread a lot.

Norma
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Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #171 on: September 02, 2011, 09:43:44 PM »
Got the flour and the cheese.

I don't know much about the Saputo Golden State select but my pizza guy told me that it is very much a Grande-quality cheese, which is pretty much what Scott R said here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8314.msg71748.html#msg71748

I don't know if Scott was talking about the Golden State label or if he meant a different one.

Either way, my pizza guy kept mentioning cheese from F&A Dairy but I guess he got me this instead.
Mike

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #172 on: September 03, 2011, 08:49:45 AM »
Using several frames in the Luigi video, I did some more forensics work and I believe that the dimensions of the bowls on the table are as follows:

Top diameter: 5"
Bottom diameter: 2.5"-2.7"
Sides (measured on the slope): 1.5"

I couldn't get more precise measurements of the bottom diameter because of the glare in the video. Using 2.6" might be a good compromise.

Peter

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #173 on: September 03, 2011, 12:44:31 PM »
Peter,

Although we don't have any concrete numbers on the Luigi dough I gave the flour a little test run at 65% hydration.

I don't know, Peter...the dough didn't look like anything what you see in the video. I mean I was able to work with it, but it was much stickier than what you see in the video, especially the scene where they weighing and balling the dough.

I tried to follow Luigi's way of mixing as close as possible but I let the mixer do its thing on Speed 2 for only 8 minutes instead of the 15 minutes Luigi uses because I didn't want to over-knead the dough.

Mike

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #174 on: September 03, 2011, 01:02:46 PM »
Mike,

Did you add the rest of the ingredients also, such as the salt, yeast and sugar? Also, it is possible that in a home setting using a standard home grade mixer you may need to cut back on the hydration. Or you might try sifting the flour and add it gradually to the water to improve its hydration. It is also possible that your flour is very fresh and has a high moisture content that didn't have a chance to diminish while in transit and storage before you got it.

I also didn't see anything in the video on the speeds used for the 15 minute mix/knead. You can see the recommended mix/knead protocol in the post at Reply 3 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7953.msg68396.html#msg68396. Also, many of the Hobart mixers, including the two models that I mentioned earlier, have 15 minute timers. I believe that Luigi used the timer. For example, you will see Luigi playing around with the timer at 1:41 in the video. At 1:45, he pushes the Start button.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 03, 2011, 02:02:35 PM by Pete-zza »

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #175 on: September 03, 2011, 01:57:37 PM »
Mike,

Did you add the rest of the ingredients also, such as the salt, yeast and sugar? Also, it is possible that in a home setting using a standard home grade mixer you may need to cut back on the hydration. Or you might try sifting the flour and add it gradually to the water to improve its hydration. It is also possible that your flour is very fresh and has a high moisture content that didn't have a chance to diminish while in transit and storage before you got it.

I also didn't see anything in the video on the speeds used for the 15 minute mix/knead. You can see the recommended mix/knead protocol in the post at Reply 3 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7953.msg68396.html#msg68396. Also, many of the Hobart mixers, including the two models that I mentioned earlier, have 15 minute timers. That might be what Luigi uses in the video.

Peter



Peter,

I did add everything and followed the mixing procedure closely, as in .25% yeast first, then 1.75% sugar...dissolve...then 2% salt. I even gave the flour a 10 minute rest after combining everything.

I have the complete formula at home and can post it later on tonight. But it's not a Luigi formula, though, since we don't have the numbers yet.

With my next batch, I'll try a lower hydration, perhaps 62%, and see what happens.
Mike

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #176 on: September 03, 2011, 08:02:55 PM »
In the next post, I will present four Luigi clone dough formulations for testing purposes. In this post, I will discuss what I did and how and why so it will hopefully be clear how I arrived at all of my numbers.

The four dough formulations in the next post are based on using 25-, 30-, 32- and 50-pound bags of the Pendleton Power high-gluten flour. By way of recapitulation, the 25-, 32- and 50-pound bags of the Power flour are unbleached. The 30-pound bag of Power flour is bleached. We don’t know exactly which size bag or flour was used in the video (although we tend not to believe that it is 50 pounds), or whether the flour in the Luigi video was bleached or unbleached. That is the reason for the multiple dough formulations and also why I have included examples of both bleached and unbleached Power flours. The latest information has it that Luigi is using 50-pound bags of Power flour, along with IDY. In the video, Guy Fieri describes the yeast as “dry active yeast”. Presumably, he means ADY. For my purposes, I used ADY but it is easy enough to convert that to IDY should anyone wish to do so. If Guy Fieri was in error and he really meant IDY, then the dough formulations will have to be corrected at such time as the error is confirmed.

For the hydration value in the dough formulations, I used 65%. That is the rated absorption value for the Power flour, as I recently reported. Also, when I looked at the Luigi video, I felt that the hydration value he used was about 65%, strictly from the appearance of the dough balls that were made shortly after the dough was completed. In a home setting using standard mixers, one might choose to use a lower hydration value since home equipment in most cases is not as good at hydrating a flour and developing the gluten structure as a commercial Hobart mixer in a commercial setting. As scott123 told us, the water used in the Luigi video is Crystal Geyser spring water, in gallon jugs. He should also get credit for having identified the Pendleton Power flour as the flour used by Luigi in the video.

In order to determine how much yeast and salt to use, I did some calculations from the video, as earlier described, and put together a cardboard mock-up of a bowl having the dimensions mentioned in Reply 172 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14928.msg151794.html#msg151794. I even glued a thin black plastic film to the inside of my bowl so that the lines of demarcation between the ingredients in the bowl would be more pronounced against the black backdrop. I did my best to carefully eyeball the amounts of ingredients as I put them into my bowl, watching frames of the video as I did so, but I was also conscious that this is not a perfect exercise and that there are also compaction dynamics with yeast and salt that can affect the final amounts that end up in the bowl (Luigi would have encountered the same laws of physics when he put the ingredients in the various bowls). However, I am comfortable about what I did overall.

To be sure that the yeast shown in the video was in two bowls, and not just one, I viewed the yeast in my bowl through a translucent container such as the one shown at 1:00 in the video (that partly obscures one of the bowls) and then did the same with salt in a bowl. The two different colors (dull for the yeast and brighter for the salt) led me to conclude that there are two bowls of yeast in the video. If the only yeast was the small amount shown in one of the bowls in the video, and there was something else in the other bowl adjacent to it (the one partly obscured by the translucent water pitcher), the amount of yeast from a baker’s percent would be woefully inadequate for a normal fermentation. Also, the stream of yeast going into the water as shown in the video is much more than a small amount.

I should also mention that I measured out the volume of yeast using IDY, not ADY. I did not have ADY in bulk to use for the weighings. However, I converted the weight of the IDY to a corresponding weight of ADY. For the conversion, I used the conversion data built into the expanded dough calculating tool, which is the tool I used to come up with the four Luigi dough clone formulations in the next post. As a cross check, I also looked at the conversion factors built into the theartisan.net yeast conversion table at http://www.theartisan.net/convert_yeast_two.htm, and the conversion data from that table is quite close to my values. If people want to do a bit of math, they can use the theartisan.net yeast conversion table to do the conversions if they prefer to use those numbers.

As I discussed before, I believe that there are two bowls of salt used in the video to make Luigi’s dough. When I later did the calculations for the salt baker’s percent, it was clear that two bowls of salt were used because using only one would have produced baker’s percent numbers for the salt that would have been too low in my opinion. To get an idea as to how low, one might just divided the salt baker’s percents in the four Luigi clone dough formulations by a factor of roughly two.

As I also noted before, I could not find a bowl on the table for the sugar. In the video, Luigi says he uses a small amount of sugar to help the yeast get started but I did not see him holding a bowl of the sugar. The video only shows about a four-second fan or stream of sugar going into the mixer bowl. So, I tried to simulate what he did by reaching into my sugar bag, grabbing a handful and releasing it from a height of a couple of feet to create a four-second stream into a bowl. That is the amount reflected in the dough formulations in the next post. If I am wrong, I will need evidence of it and will happily receive it.

Members will have the option of deciding which Luigi clone dough formulation to use. Since all of the dough formulations are based on using full bags of flours, those wishing to come up with a dough formulation for a particular size pizzas can do so by selecting the Thickness Factor option of the expanded dough calculating tool (at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html), and then enter the desired pizza size, a thickness factor value of 0.070736, and the baker’s percents for the ADY (or the correct percent of IDY if substituted for the ADY), for the salt and for the sugar from the clone dough formulation they would like to try. The Luigi video only mentions using 18 ounces of dough for an 18” pizza. Since most people do not have ovens big enough to make 18” pizzas directly on pizza stones, it makes sense to make smaller sizes. I did not use any bowl residue compensation for any of the four Luigi clone dough formulations since I was trying to recreate what I think is happening in the Luigi video. Members should feel free to use them if they so wish when making one or more dough balls in a home setting, which is my standard practice.

Peter

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #177 on: September 03, 2011, 08:11:02 PM »
I have presented below the four Luigi clone dough formulations. I think it will become evident that a 50-pound bag of Pendleton Power flour was not used to make the dough shown in the Luigi video. I included it since members kept noting what appeared to be 50-pound bags of flour in the storage unit next to the oven. I thought that it would have become evident that the size of the dough batch that was shown in the video was far less than you would get with a 50-pound bag of flour (around 83 pounds). But I thought it would be useful to put the matter to rest.

Some may also rule out the clone formulation based on 30 pounds of flour because it is a bleached flour, and Luigi currently uses the unbleached Power flour. However, the video does not tell us that the flour is bleached or unbleached.

Assuming that what I did was correct or nearly so, does anyone want to venture to guess which Luigi clone dough formulation might have been used in the video? And why?

I hope that members who decide to test out one or more of the Luigi clone dough formulations will report back on their results. Having spent so much time on this project, as have Mike and Norma, with others in the wings, I’d like to know if my approach and analysis was correct.

# 1: Luigi Clone Dough Formulation (Based on 25-pound Bag of Power Flour)
Pendleton Power High-Gluten Flour, Unbleached (100%):
Water (Crystal Geyser Spring Water) (65%):
ADY (0.70827%):
Salt (1.984%):
Sugar (0.22928%):
Total (167.92155%):
11339.99 g  |  400 oz | 25 lbs
7371 g  |  260 oz | 16.25 lbs
80.32 g | 2.83 oz | 0.18 lbs | 7.08 tbsp | 0.44 cups
224.99 g | 7.94 oz | 0.5 lbs | 13.44 tbsp | 0.84 cups
26 g | 0.92 oz | 0.06 lbs | 6.52 tsp | 2.17 tbsp
19042.3 g | 671.69 oz | 41.98 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: No bowl residue compensation

#2: Luigi Clone Dough Formulation (Based on 30-pound Bag of Power Flour)
Pendleton Power High-Gluten Flour, Bleached (100%):
Water (Crystal Geyser Spring Water) (65%):
ADY (0.6271%):
Salt (1.65344%):
Sugar (0.19106%):
Total (167.4716%):
13608 g  |  480 oz | 30 lbs
8845.2 g  |  312 oz | 19.5 lbs
85.34 g | 3.01 oz | 0.19 lbs | 7.53 tbsp | 0.47 cups
225 g | 7.94 oz | 0.5 lbs | 13.44 tbsp | 0.84 cups
26 g | 0.92 oz | 0.06 lbs | 6.52 tsp | 2.17 tbsp
22789.54 g | 803.86 oz | 50.24 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: No bowl residue compensation

#3: Luigi Clone Dough Formulation (Based on 32-Pound Bag of Power Flour)
Pendleton Power High-Gluten Flour, Unbleached (100%):
Water (Crystal Geyser Spring Water) (65%):
ADY (0.5533%):
Salt (1.5501%):
Sugar (0.17912%):
Total (167.28252%):
14515.2 g  |  512 oz | 32 lbs
9434.88 g  |  332.8 oz | 20.8 lbs
80.31 g | 2.83 oz | 0.18 lbs | 7.08 tbsp | 0.44 cups
225 g | 7.94 oz | 0.5 lbs | 13.44 tbsp | 0.84 cups
26 g | 0.92 oz | 0.06 lbs | 6.52 tsp | 2.17 tbsp
24281.39 g | 856.49 oz | 53.53 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: No bowl residue compensation

#4: Luigi Clone Dough Formulation (Based on 50-Pound Bag of Power Flour)
Pendleton Power High-Gluten Flour, Unbleached (100%):
Water (Crystal Geyser Spring Water) (65%):
ADY (0.35412%):
Salt (0.9921%):
Sugar (0.11464%):
Total (166.46086%):
22680 g  |  800 oz | 50 lbs
14742 g  |  520 oz | 32.5 lbs
80.31 g | 2.83 oz | 0.18 lbs | 7.08 tbsp | 0.44 cups
225.01 g | 7.94 oz | 0.5 lbs | 13.44 tbsp | 0.84 cups
26 g | 0.92 oz | 0.06 lbs | 6.52 tsp | 2.17 tbsp
37753.33 g | 1331.69 oz | 83.23 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: No bowl residue compensation

Peter

Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #178 on: September 03, 2011, 08:32:09 PM »
Peter,

WOW! I'm completely convinced that you must have really worked in a forensics lab  ;D

What you posted is fantastic and I will definitely report back to you on how things turned out since I am probably the only one with a bag of PPF at the moment. But Norma could probably achieve comparable results with the Sir Lancelot flour, no?

But I have one question: How do I know which formula to use? I could test all four, no problem, but we'd still don't really know which one's the one Luigi uses or comes closest to his except for going to get a slice in person. No wait, the 'bleached' version is out since I don't have that kind of flour.

I also might have to lower the hydration a couple of percentage points.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Essen1

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Re: Pizzeria Luigi in San Diego, CA
« Reply #179 on: September 03, 2011, 08:53:08 PM »
Given the numbers Peter has set forth in above's post I came up with a scaled down first version (25lb bag), using IDY instead of ADY, for a 17" Luigi clone with a hydration of 62%.

If there are any errors in it, please point them out.

25 lb bag clone / 2 x 17" pizza


Flour (100%):
Water (62%):
IDY (0.56437%):
Salt (1.984%):
Sugar (.22928%):
Total (164.77765%):
Single Ball:
552.48 g  |  19.49 oz | 1.22 lbs
342.53 g  |  12.08 oz | 0.76 lbs
3.12 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.04 tsp | 0.35 tbsp
10.96 g | 0.39 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.96 tsp | 0.65 tbsp
1.27 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.32 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
910.36 g | 32.11 oz | 2.01 lbs | TF = 0.070736
455.18 g | 16.06 oz | 1 lbs

32 lb bag clone / 2 x 17" pizza

Flour (100%):
Water (62%):
IDY (0.44092%):
Salt (1.5501%):
Sugar (0.17912%):
Total (164.17014%):
Single Ball:
554.52 g  |  19.56 oz | 1.22 lbs
343.8 g  |  12.13 oz | 0.76 lbs
2.44 g | 0.09 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.81 tsp | 0.27 tbsp
8.6 g | 0.3 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.54 tsp | 0.51 tbsp
0.99 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.25 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
910.36 g | 32.11 oz | 2.01 lbs | TF = 0.070736
455.18 g | 16.06 oz | 1 lbs

50 lb bag clone / 2 x 17" pizza

Flour (100%):
Water (62%):
IDY (0.35412%):
Salt (0.9921%):
Sugar (0.11464%):
Total (163.46086%):
Single Ball:
556.93 g  |  19.64 oz | 1.23 lbs
345.29 g  |  12.18 oz | 0.76 lbs
1.97 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.65 tsp | 0.22 tbsp
5.53 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.99 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
0.64 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.16 tsp | 0.05 tbsp
910.36 g | 32.11 oz | 2.01 lbs | TF = 0.070736
455.18 g | 16.06 oz | 1 lbs

All three formulas are without bowl residue compensation.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2011, 09:24:56 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/