Author Topic: I registered last night...and I have been searching ever since!  (Read 1075 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline badwolfbay

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3
I promise.  Haha

If the answer to my question is somewhere easy, I will go nuts.

My question is, Is there a thread to prime me up on these measurements?  The 100% 4% .32%, what does it all mean?

I have searched, but can not find.  I am not a baker, but would like to learn this terminology, so I can be a pizza baker.  Haha

Thanks in advance!  I hope I am not too annoying with the n00b question. 


Offline texmex

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 209
  • Location: out in that West Texas Town.....
Re: I registered last night...and I have been searching ever since!
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2011, 04:26:22 PM »
Welcome, and enjoy!

all that percentage stuff is baker's percentages--a tried and true concept for maintianing uniformity as closely as possible with a crazy variable of fermenting doughs nd temperature fluctuations. 
It's all science, and a little luck.

Here's a few links to explain this in detail:

http://www.theartisan.net/bakers_percentage_revised_2001.htm


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baker_percentage
Reesa

Offline Steve

  • Steve Zinski
  • Administrator
  • *
  • Posts: 1944
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Richmond, VA
    • pizzamaking.com
Re: I registered last night...and I have been searching ever since!
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2011, 04:31:11 PM »
I promise.  Haha

If the answer to my question is somewhere easy, I will go nuts.

My question is, Is there a thread to prime me up on these measurements?  The 100% 4% .32%, what does it all mean?

I have searched, but can not find.  I am not a baker, but would like to learn this terminology, so I can be a pizza baker.  Haha

Thanks in advance!  I hope I am not too annoying with the n00b question. 

Baker's percentages. You start with the weight of the flour (which is always 100%), then add the remaining ingredients (by weight) in the percentage relative to the flour weight.

For example, if a recipe calls for flour (100%), and water (50%), take the weight of the flour... let's say it's a 25 pound sack of flour... and multiply it by 0.50 (50%) to get the weight of the water that you'll need... in this case the recipe would call for 12.5 pounds of water.

Doing it this way allows you to easily scale the recipe. If you're using 1 pound of flour, then you'd use 1/2 pound of water.

Make sense?  :chef:
Pizzamaking.com is a member-supported public resource. Click HERE to become a Supporting Member.

Offline badwolfbay

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3
Re: I registered last night...and I have been searching ever since!
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2011, 04:32:41 PM »
Thanks SO much to you both!

Yeah, I love to cook, but HATE to bake.  For that reason only.

I can throw things into whatever, and make something nice cooking, measurements really doesn't matter as much as temp control and creativity.

Baking, its ALL measurements.  Ha

That being said, I want to learn, and this is where I have placed my flag to do it.

Steve, great site!  Glad to be here, it is a great resource.

Thank you for the links, I will be sure to check them out. And great explanation.  You guys are a great help.

Thanks again!