Author Topic: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)  (Read 10420 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« on: June 17, 2005, 05:55:19 PM »

Most people who cook discover tools and techniques along the way which assist them in achieving the larger and/or better known aspects of cooking.  I thought it might fun to hear what “little” tools, and techniques associated with those tools, people have discovered.  I’ll start with three of my favorites and include pictures and websites.

My first tool/technique I’ll offer is one of my favorite recent finds, but pretty simple.  I’ve read about several people here having problems with dough sticking to things like the pizza peel.  Or, for instance, when I make cracker-type crust, I like to spread the sauce and cheese all the way over the edge of the dough; a pan with holes I have gives the best results with that type of pizza, but it makes a mess on the pan to spread ingredients on it (especially after it’s cooked).

What I use is Reynolds Wrap Release, which is a nonstick foil.  It is so slippery you have to be careful not to tilt your pizza if that stuff is under it.  It’s solved most of my sticking problems.  http://www.reynoldskitchens.com/reynoldskitchens/kitchenconnection/products/release/index.asp


Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Genius Garlic Cutter and Technique for Garlic-ing Pizza.
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2005, 05:56:58 PM »


I like to use fresh herbs and spices on my pizza, and garlic is a favorite.  But I find mincing gives a flavor that’s too strong, and hand chopping doesn’t yield a uniform result.  I use the Genius Garlic Cutter to get perfect tiny cubes of garlic.  http://www.garlicgenius.co.uk/genius.htm  You put a couple of cloves of garlic in it side by side, screw down the top, and that forces the garlic through a sharp grid.  Anothe-r part shaves off the extruding garlic into uniform cubes.  It costs under $30 and comes in plastic or stainless steel.

Once you have the garlic, spreading it evenly on the pizza is another challenge since its so tiny and sticky.  I like garlic as the last thing I put on so it’s most exposed to heat.  What I do is very lightly coat the garlic with olive oil (so it will cook better), and then mix that with a small amount of shredded parmesan-like cheese (my favorite is grana padana, and I use a scant 1/2 ounce for a 14 inch pizza).  Work the garlic into the cheese so it breaks up the “shred” into smaller pieces, and mixes thoroughly with the cheese.  Now you have a mixture with which you can easily distribute garlic flavor evenly over the pizza, without adding too much more cheese.

Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Soapstone Pizza Griddle
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2005, 05:59:14 PM »

After your pizza is done, you might want to take your time eating it, and still have it stay hot.  I use a 15 inch soapstone griddle which I heat up for 7 minutes or so (at 650°) just before I put my pizza in the oven. When the pizza is done you can put it on a pan of any size, cut it, and then set the pan on the soapstone (if you put the pizza directly on the soapstone it will continue to cook the bottom of the pizza; for more insulation you can cut a cardboard circle the size of the soapstone, and put it between the pan and the soapstone).

Soapstone is amazing stuff, it radiates heat evenly and for a long period of time.  Even an hour later your stone will still be warm.  The only drawback is that it is expensive, but I really love mine and I’d replace it ASAP if it ever broke.  At this link http://fantes.com/soapstone.htm are 12 inch and a 15 inch stones; and at another area of the same site http://fantes.com/pizza.htm . . . scroll down and you can see All-Clad’s handsome 13 inch version for more money.  BTW, before you use soapstone cookware you have to “cure” it by coating it in oil and heating it.  Once you do the light gray soapstone turns black, which is really nice looking with the copper or stainless handles.

Offline pyegal

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 84
  • Location: North Carolina, USA
  • Have a peetza pie everyday!
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2005, 07:07:25 PM »
Instead of  mincing my garlic with a knife, or using the garlic press which is not so easy to clean,
I grate my cloves of garlic on a microplane grater. It's fast, you get uniform small pieces of garlic, and
it's very easy and quick to wash up.

Sometimes ease of clean-up is the deciding factor in the kitchen for me.

pyegal

Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2005, 07:47:14 PM »
Oh shoot, I knew I forgot one little tool I've found useful.  It's an online calculator for converting one type of scales to another like linear, temperature, volume . . . even wind chill factor.  http://www.dupontert.com/Conversions/conversion_tables.htm

I use weight and temperature conversions a lot.

Offline scott r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3061
  • Age: 43
  • Location: boston
  • I Love Pizzafreaks!
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2005, 03:52:06 AM »
Les, These are some great products/tips!  Thank you so much.  You described exactly a problem I always have with garlic.  I really like to use it to top my white (creamy pesto) pizzas.  I always end up with clumps instead of even distribution, and this sounds like just the ticket. 
Also, Lately I have been having a hell of a time with super high hydration Neapolitan doughs sticking to my peel.  Even with a tiny amount of flour on the bottom of the pizza I notice a really strong bitter flavor that comes from the burning flour. I never noticed this with lower oven temps, but now it has really become a problem.  I can't wait to try the new foil!

Offline David

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 966
  • What’s So Funny ‘Bout Pizza Love and Understanding
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2005, 10:21:43 AM »
Do you use a metal or wood peel Scott?IMO a metal peel is better and possibly easier.Wood 'wants' to absorb any moisture it seems.Even with the Neapolitan dough I think you can dust off too much excess flour before you plant in on your cooking surface.TIP.....Any professional Chef will use the 'Heel" of his heavy cooks knife to crush his garlic.You will find that if you also add a pinch of salt underneath the whole cloves,it will act like a cutting compound and produce a nice smooth creamy paste.
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2005, 11:50:34 AM »
Any professional Chef will use the 'Heel" of his heavy cooks knife to crush his garlic.You will find that if you also add a pinch of salt underneath the whole cloves,it will act like a cutting compound and produce a nice smooth creamy paste.

Just a point.  I'd tried every garlic variation I could including using the mini bowl on my food processor with some olive oil.  With mincing or a paste, too much garlic flavor comes out and so it would dominate too much.  Chopping was better, but it was difficult to get even pieces, which I wanted so that when you ate the pizza you got a uniform taste.

When I stumbled on the Genuis cutter, it just what I wanted because it gives you perfect tiny cubes of garlic, all the same size.  With a light coating of oil, it cooks just fine on the top of the pizza, and when you eat it the garlic flavor is subtle.  Mostly what I like is to have fresh stuff on a pizza, uncooked prior to putting it on the pizza.  So that was part of my mission with the garlic too.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21901
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2005, 11:54:05 AM »
Below are my personal candidates for useful "tips and tools". I've reported on them elsewhere but I like the idea of having these sorts of things at one thread.

1) Shower caps. In lieu of using plastic wrap and rubber bands, I frequently use the freebie hotel shower caps to cover a bowl in a dough is placed. The rubberized band clings to most dough containers and, because it is transparent, it allows you to see what is happening to the dough. And they are reusable.

2) Proofing box. For me, this is one of my most useful tools. I use it to control dough temperature, especially in the winter, and I also use it to make pizzas (using the Bel Aria 00 flour) within an hour. I described and showed my proofing box at Reply #6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,403.0.html.

3) Straight-sided containers and rubber bands. When I need to know when a dough has doubled in volume, I use a straight-sided translucent or transparent container (round or rectangular, it doesn't matter) and rubber bands. When I put the dough into the container, I press it down so that the surface is flat and place a rubber band around the container at that level. I then measure up twice the distance and place a second rubber band. When the dough rises to the level of the second rubber band (the dough may be domed a bit), I know the dough has doubled. Using rubber bands avoids having to hunt around for special pens that can write on plastic and having the markings actually stay there and not rub off. Most of my straight-sided containers are Rubbermaid, which come in several different sizes.

4) Large Hefty OneZip freezer storage bags. When I want to ferment a dough at room temperature and to monitor its behavior, I often use a large Hefty OneZip freezer storage bag (any other equivalent brand will also do). It has a zip-type closure that seals the bag in one easy, gliding movement. I put the dough (very lightly oiled) into the bag, move the closure to almost the end of the bag to leave a small opening into the bag, insert a straw into that small opening, blow into the bag to inflate it, and then remove the straw quickly while I move the closure to its fully closed position. This procedure produces an inflated bag where I can see the dough during its entire rise. Another thing I noticed is that when I use a natural preferment in the dough, the smells of the dough intensify over a period of many hours because the volatile components are trapped within the inflated bag. When I open the bag and can smell the alcohol and other by-products of fermentation, I generally know that I am going to get good crust flavor because of these by-products of fermentation. For an example of the above technique (for a naturally leavened Lehmann dough), see Reply #132 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg10461.html#msg10461.

5) Small freezer storage bags. When I want to make several dough balls that need to be refrigerated and refrigerator space is at a premium, I frequently use several small freezer storage bags, one for each dough ball. After lightly coating each dough ball with a bit of olive oil, I place it into its own storage bag, flatten it by pressing against it from the outside, and then close the bag. If the dough is of a type that I do not expect to rise much, if at all, while in the refrigerator (such as a Lehmann NY style dough), I use the same technique as described in tip 4 above, but instead of inflating the bag, I suck out the air. That collapses the bag around the dough and produces a nice compact unit that requires little refrigerator space and will cool quickly because the bag itself is of very low mass. Of course, this technique may not work as well if the dough contains a lot of yeast or its temperature is high to begin with, since either of these will promote rapid volume expansion.

6) Metal containers. When I want a dough to cool off quickly in the refrigerator, I sometimes use a metal lidded container, such as a metal cookie tin. Metal is a better conductor than plastic, glass, wood or other like material, so it will cool more quickly when in the refrigerator. If I want to cool the dough down even faster, I sometimes put the metal container--empty--in the refrigerator to cool while I am making the dough. While I haven't done it, I suspect that you could also put the metal container in the freezer for about 10 minutes to achieve the same result.

7) Plastic Doggie Bag. This is a new tip that I haven't reported on before, since I have only recently been experimenting with it, so far with reasonably good results. This tip involves using one of those plastic see-through containers that restaurants often use to allow patrons to bring a small item of unfinished food home--a "plastic doggie bag" as it were. I have been using it to hold small dough balls while fermenting (most recently for a refrigerated dough). Rather than trying to use words to describe that item, I have shown it below in "open" and "closed" positions. As will be noted in the photos, the plastic doggie bag has a top lid that is conveniently hinged at the back and thus remains with the unit at all times. In the closed position, the lid attaches to two little pedestals on the main body at the left and right front corners. The nice thing about this unit is that it allows you to see the dough at all times, and it is compact enough to use at room temperature and in the refrigerator. And it is reusable. Its principal disadvantage is that it is fragile and prone to cracking if not handled gently.

8) Sign of the Cross. Some time ago, I saw an Italian woman in a Tyler Florence segment on foodnetwork.com (on authentic Neapolitan pizza) make a cross in the dough once it was put into a container to rise. I didn't know whether the cross was functional, that is, to facilitate expansion of the dough, or whether it had religious significance.  Maybe it was both. However, after trying this several times, I have noticed that when the dough has about doubled in volume, the horizontal and vertical cuts will have expanded and taken on the appearance and shape of petals of a flower. It's actually quite esthetic. I don't know if this approach is as accurate at using tip 3 above, but I now do it for divine inspiration, if for no other reason :).

Peter

« Last Edit: June 24, 2012, 12:52:14 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2005, 06:56:28 PM »
Below are my personal candidates for useful "tips and tools". I've reported on them elsewhere but I like the idea of having these sorts of things at one thread.

Wow.  Great tips Peter.  Just what I was hoping too, that the experienced members would cough up a few of their secrets. 

One thing I don't quite understand is why you use a proofing box if you are refrigerating the dough soon after it's put together.  Also, did you notice any practical value in "crossing" the dough?

Probably everyone knows you can get those "doggie bags" at restaurant supply places online.  At one of the pizza supply places I bought 50 pizza boxes (because I taked pizzas out to share with friends).
« Last Edit: June 18, 2005, 06:58:23 PM by Les »


Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21901
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2005, 07:42:35 PM »
Les,

I don't use the proofing box for doughs, like the basic Lehmann NY style dough, that are intended to go into the refrigerator as soon as I am done making them. The proofing box is mainly for room temperature fermented doughs.

Originally I made the proofing box to use in making sourdough breads. But I subsequently found that I could use it in other ways, such as for room-temperature fermented doughs that required a little more warmth because my kitchen was too cold. It is far easier (and cheaper) to use the proofing box, which can get up to around 120 degrees F, than to heat up my whole house. I have also used the proofing box for bringing refrigerated doughs up to room temperature where the kitchen was too cool to allow this to happen in a reasonable time. For the one-hour pizzas I make, I jack the temperature up to 120 degrees F (you'd have to read one of my posts on how I make those pizzas to really know what I am talking about). It's one of my favorite uses when I am hungry and don't want to spend hours to make a pizza.

I have even experimented with exposing the dough to moisture by putting a cup of boiling water into the proofing box along with the dough. I found that it wasn't necessary (and maybe not even desirable) to cover the dough or even coat it with olive oil.

As you can see, the uses of the proofing box are limited only by one's imagination. I have found the proofing box to be useful enough that I even have them at homes of friends and family where I am called upon to make pizzas, especially in winter in cold parts of the country. As long as there is a Home Depot or Lowe's nearby, I can assemble one in short order.

As far as I can tell, the cross put into a dough does allow the dough to expand by relieving the surface tension. In fact, it is useful because you can see the expansion gradually take place and, to a degree, monitor the rate of expansion. It doesn't work for all kinds of doughs, such as those that have very high hydration and don't expand much, if at all. I was kind of hoping that the significance of the cross was religious, since I am always receptive to help from anywhere. I was also hoping that one of our Italian members, maybe pizzanapoletana (Marco), might explain the significance of the cross.

Peter

Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2005, 02:10:42 PM »
If you've ever spilled cheese on your pizza stone and baked it black, you know how hard it can be to get it off.  The Kyocera ceramic planer is an incredibly hard substance, normally used to scrape cutting boards clean.  But it works really well on a pizza stone too without losing it's edge.

At the site below is the best deal I've found for one:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/stores/detail/-/kitchen/B00012F0X4/?tag=pizzamaking-20

Offline giotto

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 411
  • Location: SF Bay Area
  • Italy has DOC, we have NY standards.
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #12 on: June 26, 2005, 12:59:11 AM »
With regard to metal peels, I have one and would not say that it is the better way to go with raw dough-- the pizza causes sweat marks and it will stick. 

I still prefer screens as the way to go with zero flour additional taste, if only for the 1st minute.  There's already plenty on the topic of screens under the Equipment & Supplies title, including "my pizza stone just exploded," "I've retired my stone" and this one on screen conversions (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,243.0.html).  With recent tests, I set my oven at 700F via my highest broiler setting, and found that the screen heated up to 700F in a minute.  Both the screen and stone dropped in temp when the oven was opened. The screen popped back immediately.  Needless to say, I only use the metal peel when handling hot screens or partially heated dough that I wish to transfer directly to a rack or onto a stone. 

In rare cases when I don't use a screen, the new Reynold's wrap works great for so many applications.  Parchment paper is not bad, or you can slide raw dough right off a separate thin wooden board after stretching it as I saw one slick pro do recently. 

I sure do like my garlic pickled in something like a favorite olive juice (I love spanish green olives and garlic).  I get them with olives at the Farmer's market since the Garlic capital is down the road from me.  You can easily eat them whole this way... and I slice them like I'd slice an olive-- nice and thin length wise... it's so perfect on pizza.

Otherwise, I agree that simpler is better when it comes to clean up.  I avoid anything sizzling HOT sitting near kids or guests at the dinner table.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2005, 06:28:06 PM by giotto »

Offline tjacks88

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 34
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Fort Collins, Colorado
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #13 on: June 26, 2005, 09:16:47 AM »
I use a wooden and metal peel. The wooden peel is used to prep the dough and insert it into the oven. The metal peel, since it is thinner, is used to remove the finished pie. Previously I had some problems once in awhile when using the thicker wooden peel to remove the thin NY style pies I like to make, especially on pies that were really thin, the thicker wooden peel ripped a few spilling everthing on the stone. I have not had this problem going to KASL flour pies, but still use the 2 peels.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21901
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #14 on: June 26, 2005, 10:46:01 AM »
Some while back on another thread I mentioned the use of a length of dental floss to make sure that a dressed pizza isn't stuck to the peel or to try to dislodge one that has stuck for some reason. pftaylor not too long ago mentioned the use of a length of string to do the same thing--something he saw Jose at Patsy's in Harlem do.

I had occasion recently where I dressed a pizza on a peel and was ready to put it into the oven only to discover that the oven was stone cold. I had set the knob at what I thought was the right setting, but in my oven if you overshoot by just a bit, the oven doesn't go on. In any event, I was afraid that the dressed pizza would stick to the peel (wood) while the oven got up to temperature over the following hour. I had a lot of juicy San Marzano tomatoes on the dough and I could see them starting to seep into the dough, and the dough at the edges started to soften as a result and to stick to the peel. Once the oven had reached the proper temperature, I lifted the edges of the dressed pizza with my bench knife (a/k/a bench scraper) and tossed a bit of flour under the pizza all around the perimeter. I then took a piece of kitchen string about 16 inches long and, holding it at both ends and starting at the end of the pizza closest to me, passed it completely under the pizza to the opposite end. Between the added flour and the string method, I was able to free up the pizza so that it could slide into the oven and onto the stone.

Peter

Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #15 on: June 26, 2005, 03:32:47 PM »
I use a wooden and metal peel. The wooden peel is used to prep the dough and insert it into the oven. The metal peel, since it is thinner, is used to remove the finished pie. Previously I had some problems once in awhile when using the thicker wooden peel to remove the thin NY style pies I like to make, especially on pies that were really thin, the thicker wooden peel ripped a few spilling everthing on the stone. I have not had this problem going to KASL flour pies, but still use the 2 peels.

I have been thinking the same thing, but I worried the cold metal peel might crack the stone.  No problems, right?  Currently, because my wooden peel doesn't fit under the pizza easily, I just use some tongs to pull the near edge of the cooked pizza onto the rear edge (nearest me) of the peel, and then pull the rest of the pizza off the stone and onto the peel that way.  But it's a bit awkward.

I now have more experience with using semolina flour on the wooden peel, and it works soooo much better than cornmeal.  I think part of the reason is because you can spread it so evenly over the peel, yet it's more "grandular" than wheat flour and so allows the dough sort of "roll" on the peel.  Never seems to burn on the stone either.  I haven't tried parchment paper yet.

Offline tjacks88

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 34
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Fort Collins, Colorado
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #16 on: June 26, 2005, 06:07:37 PM »
I don't use any type of semolina or corn meal on the peel - the pizza I grew up with never had this so I don't want to mess with the authentic taste I am going for. I lightly dust the peel with flour and swirl it around with my hand. After stretching and tossing the dough, I lay it on the peel, then give a few quick pulls on the peel to make sure the dough slides before I put the toppings on.
Since I started using KASL I have never had any tearing or dough sticking to the peel.


Offline giotto

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 411
  • Location: SF Bay Area
  • Italy has DOC, we have NY standards.
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #17 on: June 27, 2005, 03:26:19 AM »
I noticed at Amici's pizzeria, they put the pizzas in their incredibly hot fired ovens with wooden peels, then turned and removed them with metal peels. 

I have never had a problem taking the pizza from a stone with a metal peel over the past year.  I went to metal because its thinner edge was needed even when working with a screen.  I wouldn't want to hassle working with 2 peels at home though. 

If you have not worked with a screen, consider the first 2 minutes with screen, then finish on a stone if you feel a need, or place it toward the bottom of the oven with a screen or directly on a rack as screen reviewers have done.

Here's an Amici's NY style 1000F oven pizza, using an 800F floor, that I recently had in Mtn View, CA (SF bay area):
(https://home.comcast.net/~keck-foundation1/amici-pizza.jpg)

(https://home.comcast.net/~keck-foundation1/amici-slice.jpg)


Here's a screen-only pizza that I had in my 650F oven tonight (broiler on, so I kept it way low for a good tan rather than a burn)... also airy, slender and crisp with a great taste due to a few days of fermentation, along with a bit more of a pull and chew to it than Amici's:
(https://home.comcast.net/~keck-foundation1/home-pie.JPG)

(https://home.comcast.net/~keck-foundation1/slice-home.JPG)


Amici's was the #1 US independent pizza operator in 2003 revenues.  If you're in the bay area, you should call and stop by to meet Tony G. at Pyzano's-- 5x world champion in Italy acrobatics, helped PMQ with their pizza team, multi-national pizza making awards and now manages USA pizza team for taste and other competitions.  He's been around, so to speak, and very passionate about pizza.  As an Independent operator, his single operating revenue is higher than Amici's revenue on a per pizzeria basis.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2005, 07:48:52 AM by giotto »

Offline Arthur

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 253
  • When Brooklyn Was the World
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #18 on: June 27, 2005, 11:15:19 AM »
My favorite tool is my cheese slicer.  After struggling with my fresh mozz and trying to slice thin pieces off without getting my hands fully wet and puncturing the cheese with my fingers, I found that my cheese slicer board with the thin (floss like) cutter works best.

I have something like this:
http://store1.yimg.com/I/dotcoms_1847_280815120


Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: Our Strange “Little” Tools (and Associated Techniques)
« Reply #19 on: June 27, 2005, 12:02:04 PM »
My favorite tool is my cheese slicer.  After struggling with my fresh mozz and trying to slice thin pieces off without getting my hands fully wet and puncturing the cheese with my fingers, I found that my cheese slicer board with the thin (floss like) cutter works best.

I've been looking for a solution to that.  Wouldn't you know it just last month I decided to throw out stuff I never use, and a wooden type version of that slicer was one of the casualties.  Right now I am using one of the slicing blades in my KA food processor. It works well until the last part of the cheese piece, where about 1/5 of the cheese gets mutilated and ends up as little chunks.