Author Topic: Dough Help Using a Mixer  (Read 2211 times)

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Offline Sour_Jax

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Dough Help Using a Mixer
« on: June 18, 2005, 12:46:44 PM »
I bought a 4 qt. mixer yesterday and thought I'd try it out on my newest experimental recipe.  I used the standard mixing blades (whisk-like) to mix the liquid ingredients and the first two cups of flour. Then I switched to the dough hooks.  The dough was kind of "crumbly"  :-\ so I took the dough out and kneaded it for a few minutes to get it to "come together" better and put it in the fridge overnight.  The next morning the dough had risen but was still slightly crumbly in  :'( some places.
 

How can I get the dough to come together better ??? ?

I thought I saw :o another thread about scrappy dough, but I can't seem to find it ::) any help?
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Help Using a Mixer
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2005, 01:14:43 PM »
Sour Jack,

It would help to know what type and brand of machine you are using. And also the recipe. If you are intentionally trying to get a scrappy dough, you may be thinking of a cracker-type crust. There are several threads on the forum that deal with that kind of crust, a good example of which, along with some great instructional photos, can be found at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?board=5%3baction=display%3bthreadid=105.

If you weren't trying to make a dough for a cracker-like crust, then what you described seems to suggest that you may not have used enough water. If I can see your recipe, I think I may be able to tell if that was the problem. Further, if you were using several cups of flour, including the two cups you mentioned in your post, it is also possible that your machine, with its 4-qt. capacity, can't handle all of the flour, along with the water, all at one time and produce the degree of kneading required to produce the desired finished dough characteristics. I have a 6-qt. KitchenAid stand mixer and it sometimes grunts and groans if I try to make too much dough at one time. More than one of our members has burned out a machine trying.

Peter

Offline Sour_Jax

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Re: Dough Help Using a Mixer
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2005, 10:04:59 PM »
First, I don't know a whole lot about making pizza (especially the lingo) so what I'm about to reveal will probably show my rookie status.

The mixer is a GE 225-Watt Hand/Stand Mixer.

The style was American.  (Thin crust crunch w/ medium-thick thickness)

Recipe:
4 c. Flour
1.5 c. water
1 packet (0.25 oz.) ADY
1.5 t. Salt
3 T. Dry Milk
2 t. Sugar
2 T. Olive oil

1. In 0.5 c. water mix 1.5 t. sugar and packet of Yeast let sit for 10 min.
2. In 1 c. water mix 0.5 t. sugar, 2 T. Olive oil, 1.5 t. salt, 3 T. Dry Milk.
3. Mix #1 and #2 together.
4. Mix liquid mixture with 1 cup of flour at a time until completely mixed.
The best things in life are free! Salvation being the greatest!

Give a man a pizza, he'll be happy for a day.
Teach him to make pizza, he'll be happy for a lifetime.

visit
www.handbookforlife.com
www.SourJax.net

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Help Using a Mixer
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2005, 11:04:01 PM »
Sour Jack,

Don't worry about the lingo. We all started out the same way.

Looking at your recipe, I don't see anything in it that would suggest that you were using too little water. However, I estimate that the dough batch you tried to make weighs around 32 ounces. I think the problem was that your machine couldn't handle that amount of dough at one time.

By any chance, is your GE machine like the one shown at the Wal-Mart website at http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp?product_id=2593949&cat=133027&type=1&dept=4044&path=0%3A4044%3A90548%3A90546%3A133027#long_descr?. I notice that the unit comes with a dough hook but I suspect the unit isn't big enough or powerful enough to make 32 ounces of pizza dough at one time, especially if the flour you are using (which you didn't specify) is something like bread flour. Most of our members who have stand mixers have KitchenAid units or something comparable. They have power ratings of 250-575 watts (more or less) and cost orders of magnitude more (hundreds of dollars) than yours if it's like the one at Wal-Mart.  And, even at that, they don't do as good a job as we would like.

What you may want to do is make your dough in two batches. This means dividing the quantities of your recipe in half. Then figure out how much dough each pizza will need. You didn't indicate, but I assume the roughly 32 ounces of dough is for at least two pizzas. If making two batches doesn't work out, other than going to three batches, the answer may be that the machine may not be the right one for making pizza dough. But, before coming to that conclusion, give the machine another try with two batches.

Peter


Offline Sour_Jax

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Re: Dough Help Using a Mixer
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2005, 08:34:16 AM »
Actually the mixer is the one from Walmart, I didn't find a KitchenAid Mixer until I went to Lowe's yesterday.  I'll try you suggestions and if all else fails I go back to hand mixing until I can get a KitchenAid.

Thanks

Sour Jack
The best things in life are free! Salvation being the greatest!

Give a man a pizza, he'll be happy for a day.
Teach him to make pizza, he'll be happy for a lifetime.

visit
www.handbookforlife.com
www.SourJax.net


 

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