Author Topic: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?  (Read 151615 times)

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Offline mommasarah

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #100 on: August 25, 2008, 08:15:58 PM »
brandonjburton,

It's not a matter of agreement.  That's just what Little Caesars does with their dough.  So if you're looking for authenticity, cover the dough balls with oil, but don't encase them in anything else.  I think most people will probably want to encase their dough, in a bowl with a lid for example, because they don't want to pick up any funk floating around in their refrigerator.  Whenever I refrigerate my dough, I always use a glass bowl and lid, but I don't go for LC authenticity.  Also understand that those dough balls at LC are stacked in a special dough rack, so you may not have access to the same dynamics.

If your dough ball is well oiled (sometimes LC dough is over-oiled) drying out shouldn't be an issue.  I remember there being a few times the dough would get a little crusty around the edges, but that was usually after being in the walk-in cooler for three days.

- red.november
if you dont cover the dough with oil the outter of the dough dries out and becomes hard this leaves hard spots ( hard enough to chip a tooth on ) in the final pizza product


Offline November

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #101 on: August 25, 2008, 11:30:07 PM »
There is one thing that everyone has failed to add to the dough recipe it is something small that effects the flavor largely. Before you put the dough down to cook on the pan don't use oil, or flour use corn meal.

Everyone has failed?!  It was mentioned in the first post of this thread and has been acknowledged since.

Dough was then stretched and tossed by hand and placed into a 2inch deep black, hard coat pan covered in yellow cornmeal.

Offline IndyRob

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #102 on: October 24, 2008, 08:13:12 PM »
Thanks for this awesome thread.  I have some pans (round, and square with the Baby Pan separators) that came from a closed Little Caesar's, and will be trying the dough recipes here.  It was interesting to read about how the dough is handled because my impression had always been that they suffer from inconsistancy.

But I also wanted to bring up something slightly off topic - Little Caesar's sandwiches.  They're not available in my area anymore.  I must have been the only person around that loved them.  But I had a moment of inspiration and duplicated them.

Just take 10" round of the dough and cut in half.  Let rise covered, then brush with butter and bake in a 400 degree oven for about 15 minutes until golden.  Remove and brush again with butter and let cool on a rack.  Then slice the flat side like a pita bread and insert cheese, salami and ham (refrigerate at this point if desired).  Then wrap in a paper towel and

microwave for 30-45 seconds to heat and melt the cheese.  Stuff again with lettuce, tomato and onion.

The microwave step steams the bread which would otherwise be a tough pizza dough bread wanna-be.  My suspicion is that since LC offers these both cold and hot, the cold ones are like shoe leather and the hot ones may not always make it to the cusomer in time.

Eh, my $0.02.

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #103 on: February 10, 2009, 01:27:17 AM »
Hi All

I am planning on attempting this recipe tonight.
My reason for trying this one in particular is 2 fold.

1) I have finally obtained Gluten Flour. This is the perfect opportunity to experiment with gluten flour.
2) This recipe calls for KASL flour which I believe is High Gluten flour. I have never worked with High Gluten Flour before so again a perfect opportunity to do so.

As Pete previously requested from me, I have the amount of protein there is in a cup of my bread flour. 1 Cup of bread flour is +- 150g. 17.55g protein per cup flour. Currently my bread flour is 11.7% protein.
I was not able to weigh 1/4 cup of the gluten flour as my batteries on my scale died. Lets just assume its the same as Bobs Redmill. Please help me transform my flour into High Gluten Flour.

I am also going to downscale my recipe from 14" to 9.26 Inch. This is the only size pan that is dark compared to my other pans that are more on the silver side. It is also 1 inch deep. I hope that is fine.

I will also be using regular sugar rather than corn syrup.

This is the dough formulation I am going to use.
Feel free to correct anything that doesn't seem right.

Flour (100%):
Water (59.6%):
IDY (0.93%):
Salt (01.86%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (3.11%):
Sugar (5.28%):
Total (170.78%):
144.11 g  |  5.08 oz | 0.32 lbs
85.89 g  |  3.03 oz | 0.19 lbs
1.34 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.44 tsp | 0.15 tbsp
2.68 g | 0.09 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.48 tsp | 0.16 tbsp
4.48 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.99 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
7.61 g | 0.27 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.91 tsp | 0.64 tbsp
246.11 g | 8.68 oz | 0.54 lbs | TF = 0.128905

I propose to use the following method as described in Pete's post here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg33252.html#msg33252 . What dough temperature should I go for. I am heading for a 2 day cold fermentation.

1) Sift my Flour+VWG into a bowl.

2) Add all the water to my mixer bowl.

3) Unfortunately I do not have a wire whisk like the one you use, so I would go straight to my flat beater attachment. I will add my mixture of Flour+VWG a table spoon at a time to my water. I will add approx 80% of the flour at this stage while at stir speed.

4) Once the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl I will add the IDY and at stir speed continue still using the beater attachment for 30 secs.

5) I will then add in the remaining 20% of the flour together with the Salt, Sugar and Oil.

6) At this point I would have been kneading the dough for approx 3-4 minutes using the flat beater attachment.

7) I would then switch to my Dough Hooks and continue kneading for about 4-5 minutes till the dough is smooth, cohesive that's not sticky but tacky.

8) I don't know if this step is an optional one as I would like to skip it since my hand kneading capabilities are much limited. Anyways if it is needed I would then reference to the following post on tips to how this step is done.
http://www.woodstone-corp.com/cooking_naples_style_dough.htm

9) Reshape dough into a round ball and lightly oil dough ball using my fingers. I would then place the dough ball in a lightly oiled plastic dish tightly sealed with plastic wrap and place in the fridge for 2 days.

The rest of the process would be discussed in another post hopefully a few hours before I can bake my pizza.
While on the topic of baking, could anyone tell me how important is the addition of cornmeal to the pan before placing the dough inside. The reason I ask is I don't have any on hand and was wondering whether this step could be skipped or not.
Also what type of crust does this type of pizza produce. Is it similar to a Pizza Hut Pan Pizza where the crust is fried giving it and extremely crispy texture?

Wish me luck guys
Hope this one is successful, not like my other attempts at other recent experiments which were total disasters.

Regards
PizzaManic
« Last Edit: February 10, 2009, 01:35:42 AM by PizzaManic »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #104 on: February 10, 2009, 10:54:23 AM »
PizzaManic,

The numbers you got from the expanded dough calculating tool using your inputs are correct.

Now that you have some vital wheat gluten (VWG), I think it is an opportune time for you to learn how to use member November's Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/. For this purpose, assume 1) that your VWG has a protein content similar to the Bob's Red Mill VWG (75%), 2) your flour has a protein content of 11.7% (17.55/150 = 11.7%), 3) the amount of flour in your dough formulation is 5.08 ounces, and 4) you want to increase the protein content of your flour so that it is the same as a high-gluten flour, specifically, 14.2%. Once you get the amount of VWG you will need for this purpose using November's tool, divide that quantity, in ounces, by 0.0881834. That will be the amount of VWG, by volume, you will need.

I think it will be safe to omit step 8 in your planned sequence. However, you many want to do some final hand kneading and shaping to be sure that the dough is in the proper final condition before going into the refrigerator. FYI, to avoid having a smiley substituted in your reply for the number 8, you should check the box below the reply field that says "Don't use smileys".

Apparently, cornmeal is an integral part of the Domino's pizza, much like the Dustinator flour blend is a part of the Papa John's pizzas. So, in your case you might substitute either semolina flour or a Dustinator type blend for the cornmeal.

Based on the dough formulation you are using, I would say that the final product is more likely to be like a Papa John's pizza than a Pizza Hut pan pizza.

Peter



« Last Edit: March 12, 2013, 11:30:22 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #105 on: February 11, 2009, 10:01:25 AM »
Hi Pete

I have used member November's Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator. Attached is an image of how I entered in the numbers to calculate how much VWG is needed for this particular recipe

I am a little confused with the results of this calculator
What does MassA and MassB mean?
Using these figures, how do I calculate the amount of VWG needed in grams as well as in volume(teaspoons required). What i did do is divide 4.8794/0.0881834=55.3324 . Is this answer the number of grams of VWG required.

With regards to the Corn Meal, I don't mind substituting the dustinator. How much must I use and do I just spread it all over my pan before placing the pizza inside the pan?

What dough temperature should I aim for if I plan to Cold Ferment the dough for 2 days.

Thanks again
Regards
PizzaManic

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #106 on: February 11, 2009, 10:35:21 AM »
PizzaManic,

You used the tool correctly but used the wrong number to divide by 0.0881834. In your case, MassA is the weight of the VWG, and MassB is the weight of the base flour (bread flour in your case). They correlate with the A and B entries at the top of the tool. So, you should have divided 0.2006 by 0.0881834, which would have given you the volume of VWG to add to the 4.8794 ounces of the base flour. Doing that division, the amount of VWG comes to 2.27 teaspoons. If you want the weight of the VWG in grams, you simply substitute 144.11 grams into the Mass box of the tool instead of 5.08 ounces, which gives you 5.6915 grams of VWG and 138.4185 grams of base flour. You will note that if you add the weights of base flour and VWG in each case (in ounces and grams), you will get 5.08 ounces and 144.11 grams, respectively.

As for use of the Dustinator clone blend, you don't have to be fussy. I just take a fistful of semolina flour, add some white flour and a bit of oil. I have never seen actual weights, so I just improvise. In your case, I would just put a thin layer of the Dustinator clone blend in your pan. I believe that is how Little Caesar's does it with the cornmeal. But if you just coat the bottom of the skin with the Dustinator clone blend before placing it into the pan, that should work as well.

I wouldn't worry too much about the finished dough temperature. To simplify matters, I would just use cool water from the refrigerator.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 11, 2009, 11:07:16 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline November

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #107 on: February 11, 2009, 10:54:49 AM »
MassA is the weight of the base flour (bread flour in your case), and MassB is the weight of the VWG. They correlate with the A and B entries at the top of the tool.

Peter,

In PizzaManic's case, MassA is the weight of the VWG, not the bread flour.  You are correct to point out that A and B correspond in the input and output of the tool.  The bottom line of your explanation is also correct.  If you want the output to be in grams, use grams.  If you want the output to be in ounces, use ounces.  If you want the output to be in shnargies, use shnargies.  It's just a calculator, not a mind reader.  I'm still working on the mind reader.

- red.november

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #108 on: February 11, 2009, 11:08:23 AM »
November,

Thanks for catching my error. I went back and corrected it in my post to PizzaManic.

Peter

Offline Xionanx

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #109 on: June 22, 2009, 05:41:54 PM »
As a fan of the "Crazy Sauce" and an ex-employee of a little Caesars I thought I would add what I recall of the process.  I cant tell you ingredients because everything we used came pre-measured and premixed in most cases.  Our "crazy sauce" for the "Crazy bread" came in a big plastic bag, our pizza sauce came in a bag, our cheese, etc.. all came pre-assembled.  If we had an instruction manual on how to make it if we ran out, I as an assistant manager was never made aware of it.  That being said:

some of this has been covered by others but count me as a second source:

Dough was made in the mornings (process has been covered) and cut into 3 different size balls.  I think it was 10, 14, and 18 oz balls if a recall for small, medium, and large; however it has been 8 years so the memory may not be exact.  Balls were placed on an oiled sheet (same oil used for dough) then brushed with oil and placed in the walk in cooler (I think we kept the cooler at 42f).  If by some strange coincidence we ran out of dough balls made the previous couple of days, we would use the ones made that day.  So rest period in the cooler could be anywhere from 48 to 8 hours.  I only recall 1 time that they lasted the full 48 hours and only recall 1 time they needed to be pulled the same day, this was over a 2 year period.  So AVG I would say is 24 hours.

To make the pizzas we would run the pizza through a mechanical sheeter until round, usually one time to get oval, then once again to make round. (NO HAND STRETCHING).  The round was placed in a black pan sprinkled with cornmeal to prevent sticking.  The "Square Pan" pizza was placed in a oiled square pan and did require some hand kneading/stretching to square it up.  So the only difference between the two was the cornmeal pan versus oil pan.

At this point the pizzas would be used, so were talking directly from fridge to pan to oven as fast as you could get toppings on them.  Now that doesn't mean time didn't elapse, in fact when I would close the store I would personally set aside a large round for myself when I got there so I could make a pizza to bring home.  The longer you let it sit, the better it tasted in my opinion.  So a 6 hour rest usually resulted in a fermented flavor you couldn't get anywhere else and only the "late night" customers and employees were privy to.  ;D

Crazy bread as pointed out was nothing but a small dough ball ran through the mechanical press 1 time to be oval shaped, placed in a medium or large square pan on cornmean, cut into 8 slices, and separated each slice by roughly 1/2 inch.  (do not shape the slices in any way, leave the dough in an oval shape).  After cooking the slices were placed on wax paper, brushed with garlic butter and sprinkled with Parmesan cheese.  Rolled up and shoved in a bag then stapled shut and placed under a warmer.  Personally the best ones were the ones that had sat for roughly 1 hour, any longer and they turn hard, and the "fresh" ones were still a little doughy to my taste.  (note cooking time was approx 1/2 that of a pizza since they were placed through the glass door at the midpoint on the conveyor).

Officially we had Small, Medium, and Large of Both round and Square Pizza's with generic toppings.  Unofficially at least at our store if you knew how/who to ask you could get:

"Stuffed Crust" pizza(cheese in the crust ala pizza hut):  We would take a large, stretch and roll the edges over cheese sticks.  Once out of the oven we would glaze the crust with garlic butter and sprinkle Parmesan on the crust just like the crazy bread.  Tasted better then pizza huts version.

"White" pizza(regular crust, brushed with garlic butter instead of pizza sauce, then other toppings as normal).  Was actually pretty good.  Personally i would made these with just pepperoni and cheese, it was the best combo IMO.

"Stuff Stuffed" pizza(A large crust, add toppings then sauce, then cheese, then stretch a medium crust over then large crust and seal.  then bake for slightly longer in the oven usually about 1 run through and another 1/4 run.  BE ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN YOU SLICE THE TOP CRUST SO AIR CAN ESCAPE, just a few cuts like you would see on a traditional pot pie).  After it comes out of the oven, brush with the garlic butter and sprinkle on the Parmesan.  This was a good one as well.

I'm not entirely sure why almost all the local Little Caesars went out of business, however there are two in Augusta, GA that I'm aware of now.  They still have some pretty good pizza there, and the "Hot N Ready" concept is awesome IMO.  Being able to walk into a pizza place and walk out with a pizza in under a minute is pretty sweet, especially if the pizza is actually good.  Which it IS!


Offline tcarlisle

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #110 on: February 19, 2010, 01:11:08 PM »
Hello I'd like to chime in on this. I am a big fan of LC pizza and I've read this forum all the way through three times and I've got dough in the fridge right now....

My question is: Everyone here seems to agree that you leave the dough uncovered in the fridge for about 24hrs, then wont it be difficult to sheet/form after its done in the fridge? Wont it be like playing with play dough that sat out to long, little pieces of hard bits mixed in with the soft.

Would some one please give us some clarifaction on this please.

I worked LC's for my first job in about 1985. I'm sure they changed recipe and process somewhat over teh years, because an LC pizza today is nowhere near as good as it was back in "the day". The photo's here are looking quite right.

As for the dough fermentation/rise. The dough was made in a big berkel mixer and then weighed out into chunks. Each chunk was rolled into a tight ball. A sheet was generously oiled  (don't recall but probably a cheap vegetbale oil).Each dough ball was briefly laid top side down to oil the top, then flipped over. The sheet was put in the walk in fridge and they were left to ferment and rise.

Yes, they developed a hard skin, but the oil kept it from becoming too hard. We'd take them out of the fridge and at room temp except when we messed up and ran out and had to use 'em cold. If they were left out at room temp too long they'd get even harder.Yes, when they were sheeted out this would result in hard bits being present. The side with the hard bits becomes the bottom of the pizza.

As for sheeting.... each ball would be doused into a mound of flour to coat both sides. Then you'd flatten it by hand just a little and pinch all around the edge to form a disc with a crust. Then they were fed through a sheeter twice.Feed once and then turn it 90 degrees and feed again. The rest of the stretching was by hand. Not tossed, just stretched. After stretching, a pan was sprinkled with corn meal fairly generously and the stretched out dough was placed in the pan with that hard side down.

Dough was pretty thick --about 1/8 to a1/4 inch thick in the pan. It was a pretty hard and dense dough. Rolling it with a rolling pin would have been hard -- the commercial sheeter was necessary.It was not nearly as stretchy as a NY style dough would be -- I describe it as a tight dough with some spring back. Also, right out of teh berkel the dough was not nearly as sticky as a NY style dough. I would guess a little less water than a NY style and a little more yeast. Lower oven temp than when cooking a NY style. Crust on LC pizza was typically just barely browned, and sometimes actually kinda underdone.

We did oil the pans when they were new (I opened the store with all new equipment -- yeah!) But after they were well broken in, no more oil. They were just wiped out with a paper towel. We'd let the dough sit in the pans for another rising, but then again if we messed up and ran out we'd skip that step.

You were supposed to open the oven doors and check about midway and pop bubbles. Sometimes we did, sometimes we didn't. LC pizza was very bubble prone.

I see mention here of the crazy bread.Yep, it was medium pizza dough fed through the sheeter once, placed on a corn mealed cookie sheet.They were sliced and then left to rise.Rising was important here -- if this was skipped they turned out flat and dense and not good. They were brushed with melted butter and garlic salt then sprinkled with a cheese. If memory serves me it was Parmesan -- probably kraft supplied it.

To really recreate this authentically, you probably want to get some pizza boxes or some type of container to let the pizza sit in it about 10 minutes to create the humidity and steam that existed in that box with the paper wrapper they used. I am sure that steaming effect had something to do with the crust texture.

Cheese was two loafs mozzarella and one round muenster. Assembly was done with a ring so as not to get sauce/cheese/toppings on the crust. Cheese always overlapped the sauce. It was not common to see an LC pizza where the sauce was visible at the crust line.

Offline AustinSpartan

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #111 on: March 06, 2011, 12:10:20 AM »
Sometimes we did, sometimes we didn't. LC pizza was very bubble prone.

You're not kidding. I loved the LC pizza bubbles as a child. Good memories, but sadly their pizza has taken a nosedive in quality.

Online DNA Dan

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Re: Little Caesars Dough Recipe?
« Reply #112 on: April 23, 2011, 12:58:09 AM »

To really recreate this authentically, you probably want to get some pizza boxes or some type of container to let the pizza sit in it about 10 minutes to create the humidity and steam that existed in that box with the paper wrapper they used. I am sure that steaming effect had something to do with the crust texture.

 :-D I got a big chuckle out of this. I suppose I should put hair and sweat on the list of ingredients to try next! It's sad but I have to say it's true. I don't think I've ever gotten a LC pizza right out of the oven on to a serving pan.


 

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