Author Topic: Need help on pizza fermentation  (Read 7038 times)

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Offline jeancarlo

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Need help on pizza fermentation
« on: June 20, 2005, 05:48:32 PM »
I like how pizza tastes when you leave the dough to ferment in the fridge for some days. I think the more you let it ferment the better the flavour, but is there a limit to fermentation? If so, how long should I let my dough ferment in the fridge?


Offline Randy

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Re: Need help on pizza fermentation
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2005, 05:55:11 PM »
From a taste stand point, to me the flavor fall off after the third day, but those that prefer a sour dough flavor would disagree.  A good question and I am sure others will offer more information.

Randy

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Need help on pizza fermentation
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2005, 06:22:57 PM »
jeancarlo,

Generally speaking, it depends on your dough recipe, your dough management practices, and, from a more technical standpoint, when the dough starts to run out of sugar (natural and added) to feed the yeast. Once that happens, the internal systems basically shut down and the dough starts to degrade and turn gummy and wet. At that point, the dough will usually be hard to handle and shape into skins (without adding a lot of bench flour) and tears and weak spots will be common. If you're are lucky enough to be able to shape the dough into a skin, the finished crust may be cracker-like and have little or no color (because of lack of residual sugar in the dough) and poor crust structure.

Some doughs, such as those made by Varasano and pftaylor, can last in the refrigerator for several days and produce acceptable results. The Lehmann dough, with which I am personally most familiar, can usually make it out to around 2-3 days, although some of our members with good refrigeration have been able to extend that for another day or two. Beyond 2-3 days, it will usually be necessary to add some sugar to the Lehmann dough at the outset. I would say that a 5- or 6-day dough would be quite uncommon.

This is one of those situations where you will learn the lifespan of your dough through experience and based on your own dough management practices and work setting. These differ from place to place so you can't really rely on the experience of others in other locales. I know you are planning to open your own pizza place in Mexico, so you will want to test your doughs over a period of several days to see when they start to run out of steam and are no longer usable. Each type of dough is likely to have its own lifespan, so you will have to determine what it is in each case, and also if you decide to change your formulations along the way.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 20, 2005, 09:16:20 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline jeancarlo

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Re: Need help on pizza fermentation
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2005, 01:08:34 AM »
My bad, I was thinking this was for the thin crust but is for the thick one so anyway.The recipe I use is simple and modified and I got it from other recipes, just tried to come out with something good and simple:
1 pkg instant yeast
1/4 tsp sugar
3/4 C warm water
2 C all purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt

Mix first 3 ingredients and let rest 10 min. Mix in flour and salt and knead by hand. On a floured surface knead dough until it sticks no more. It is now ready to use but I place it in plastic bag and let it rest for 3 days and the flavour changes and it tastes better.
Thanks for the help pete-zza and randy. :)

Offline lilbuddypizza

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Re: Need help on pizza fermentation
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2005, 07:29:06 AM »
We had a pizza place that would make its dough and would not use it UNLESS it was refrigerated for at least one full day. I am not a chemist, but I know it must have done something to create this unique taste and texture. It was very good, not sour at all.
I hate that these great pizza places of ours close without giving us notice. I would have killed to get some good recipes, including the above mentioned.

Offline jeancarlo

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Re: Need help on pizza fermentation
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2005, 05:22:43 PM »
I came out with this recipe since the only flour I could get here is the all-purpose kind. There's one that I found that has protein added to it and another one that says soft flour so I'm using the soft kind and it's working out pretty good. 3 days or fermentation are fair enough I guess but any more suggestions anyone?

Offline Perk

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Re: Need help on pizza fermentation
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2006, 05:29:51 PM »
hmm depends on someones taste.
For me I make the dough at night then use it the next night.
Dough is so inexpensive to make that if I don't use it in two days I throw it out.

My dough receipe uses less yeast but more sugar per volume of water So it may not ferment like other peoples dough.

 
 
-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.


 

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