Author Topic: Connie's  (Read 2668 times)

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Offline buzz

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Connie's
« on: June 20, 2005, 09:14:27 AM »
For anyone in the Chicago area, Connie's deep dish is probably an old favorite. It used to be just awesome pizza, with a unique taste different from Uno's, etc. In the past couple of years, though, the quality had been going steadily downhill, and now I've crossed it off the list. Really too bad.

I asked a manager once about their recipe and he said that they use only olive oil (he showed me the can--it was just a basic restaurant-quality everyday olive oil, probably a pomace); they sheet the dough; and they bake it at 450. I've tried to duplicate it and once I came close by accident with (I think) a combination of olive oil and Crisco. But they use no shortening, only oil.

My problem is this--when I make an olive oil crust (using Carapelli extra mild), not only does the crust have patches of burnt black, but it comes out tasting like burnt oil, and I taste the oil (even though the Carapelli is extremely mild tasting on its own). I don't experience this with canola. Conie's crust has almost a "fried" taste to it--crispy--but never burnt or olive oil tasting--which would indicate a high level of oil.

Any ideas?


Offline Randy

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Re: Connie's
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2005, 10:34:19 AM »
XPHMgr had said the fired like appearance comes from the tremendous amount of oil that is poured into the pan before the sough.  I think it was 1/2 cup of oil for a 14" pan for his thick crust on the bottom of the reipe page.

Randy

Offline buzz

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Re: Connie's
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2005, 10:36:38 AM »
I've already experimented with that--same results. And I've seen workers putting dough into pans at Connie's--they don't do this!

Offline Randy

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Re: Connie's
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2005, 10:45:26 AM »
Might be the dough balls are sprayed with oil prior to fermenting.

Offline buzz

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Re: Connie's
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2005, 11:03:51 AM »
I always rub oil on my dough before letting it proof. It's not the amount of oil--it's how the oil cooks, at least in my oven. A home oven is different from those commercial "ferris wheel" ones, or even metal-floored ovens.

If I recall, the "Best Recipe" people at Cook's Illustrated recommend half of cup oil in the pan for deep dish pizza--they also say you should mix ground-up potatoes in the dough!

BTW, Connie's does have a pizza fried in an iron skillet!

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Connie's
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2005, 11:26:35 AM »
Buzz,

I don't know what kind of deep-dish pan you are using, but some of mine have a very smooth, slippery finish that prevents the oil I put into the pans from covering the bottom evenly. It sort of slides around. I wonder if in such a case, the crust could develop random black splotches. I also wondered whether the flash point was a factor, but it looks like canola oil and olive oil are not all that much different from that standpoint.

Peter

Offline buzz

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Re: Connie's
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2005, 01:55:38 PM »
I have a silver-ish Chicago Metallic pan, but with the olive oil it seesm to burn black in spots even if I don't oil the pan (which I haven't been doing lately). It may be that where it burns the oil for some reason is more concentrated in the raw dough.

I'm more concerned with the overall "burned" taste of the pizza (it tastes this way with olive oil whether there are black spots or not). I would like to duplicate Connie's crust!

Offline DKM

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Re: Connie's
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2005, 07:57:01 PM »
I use the black pans, and have never had the 'burned' taste problem. (Except for when I have bured them).

I do a plain classic olive oil.

DKM
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Offline lilbuddypizza

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Re: Connie's
« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2005, 07:38:16 AM »
As a person who has been behind the scenes at Connie's, I can attest that it is not the same as it use to be. The ingredients are fresh, and the facilities are very clean, but they became a corporation. The crusts are precooked and everything is measured out and homogenous. Man, success is the death of a great pizza place. It's so ironic. A pizza place becomes popular because of its uniqueness and great taste, but when it's too big, they can't maintain the quality.
I say just look for a "mom & pop" pizza shop that has been open for 20+ years-----you'll never go wrong.

Offline IlliniPizza

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Re: Connie's
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2005, 04:41:16 PM »
For thin crust in Chicago, Connie's is the place.  I love their bread crumb crust, and their sauce.

Does anyone think they have a recipe for connies thin crust.  And a recipe, for their sauce, especially their sauce.

Home Run Inn has good thin crust pizza, but they are getting too commercial as well.  Their pizzas plaster the local grocery store aisles at Walmart.

I was at the Taste of Chicago last year, and walked around the back of their tent, and saw piles of frozen pizza boxes that you can buy at the local grocery stores.  Its a shame that people visiting Chicago, can't have authentic pizzeria pizza at the Taste anymore.


Offline buzz

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Re: Connie's
« Reply #10 on: June 29, 2005, 11:31:37 AM »
Personally speaking, I'm not a fan of Connie's thin crust, but I assume that they use the same dough as for the deep dish. I know it's olive oil based, so you can experiment. BTW, Connie's markets a frozen pizza line under their name, but it tastes absolutely nothing like a Connie's pizza--I believe it's made by some big outfit that manufactures a number of frozen pizzas (same recipe) and then slaps different brand names on them.

I miss the old Connie's--it was so good!

They used to sell big cans of their sauce in the restaurants (and it is excellent)--you might want to ask a manager if you can buy some.

Home Run Inn has a very distictive flavor--the frozen ones are O.K.

As for the "Taste of Ptomaine"--I went once, saw piles of rotting garbage and flies everywhere, and never went back!


 

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