Author Topic: digital scales  (Read 6821 times)

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Offline redox

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Re: digital scales
« Reply #25 on: August 20, 2013, 06:29:44 PM »
I thought I'd resurect this thread from the past.  I've been giving some thought to whether I need a better or more capable scale for the small ingredients like yeast and salt, oil, etc..

This is my (wife's) scale that I'm currently using.  Good for flour and water, but not the small stuff.

I do have a digital and a couple balance beam scales capable of measuring grains or grams, made for meauring gunpowder for reloading ammunition.  I'm just wondering if this is overkill or if getting these down to this level of accuracy is really beneficial?
I got one of these from Amazon, it's cheap and works just fine. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012LOQUQ/?tag=pizzamaking-20


Offline adm

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Re: digital scales
« Reply #26 on: August 20, 2013, 07:06:27 PM »
This is a pretty good one:

http://bakerybits.co.uk/bakery-equipment/scales-and-mixers/kd8000-bakery-scales-889.html

I don't know if you can get it in the US, but it's probably available under a different brand name from Amazon or somewhere. I'm sure they all come from China anyway.

Bottom line - this does bakers percentages, and weighs to 8Kg (17lbs+) with 1g (0.002 oz) accuracy.

Offline redox

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Re: digital scales
« Reply #27 on: August 20, 2013, 07:10:17 PM »
This is a pretty good one:

http://bakerybits.co.uk/bakery-equipment/scales-and-mixers/kd8000-bakery-scales-889.html

I don't know if you can get it in the US, but it's probably available under a different brand name from Amazon or somewhere. I'm sure they all come from China anyway.

Bottom line - this does bakers percentages, and weighs to 8Kg (17lbs+) with 1g (0.002 oz) accuracy.
I've got this one, too but it's no good for very small amounts like yeast. I use the one in my previous post for that. Unless you spend big bucks you're not likely to get both abilities in an inexpensive scale. Now if you buy a Mettler scale...
« Last Edit: August 20, 2013, 07:12:57 PM by redox »

Offline adm

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Re: digital scales
« Reply #28 on: August 20, 2013, 07:35:10 PM »
I've got this one, too but it's no good for very small amounts like yeast. I use the one in my previous post for that. Unless you spend big bucks you're not likely to get both abilities in an inexpensive scale. Now if you buy a Mettler scale...

I fully agree with that. But I have a cheap $10 chinese low weight scale as well  - that purports to weigh down to hundredths of a gram (but only from 20g to 0.01g), but I am not sure it does so completely accurately. Doesn't really matter though as I never need to go more than tenths of a gram and I think it's pretty accurate in that range.

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: digital scales
« Reply #29 on: August 21, 2013, 02:04:54 PM »
I also have both of the scales pictured below.  They will measure to one hundredth of a Grain.  There are approximately 15.5 grains to a gram.  The digital scale has a gram mode as well and reads to one hundredth of a gram.

One of these could be used to super accurately measure yeast or salt or oil.  But is that level of measurement accuracy of any value?

scott123

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Re: digital scales
« Reply #30 on: August 21, 2013, 02:14:07 PM »
One of these could be used to super accurately measure yeast or salt or oil.  But is that level of measurement accuracy of any value?

I know that Brian Spangler, of Apizza Scholls, measures his yeast with this kind of precision.  I'm pretty geeky when it comes to measurements and replicating results, but I'm not that geeky. I measure yeast by volume and I weigh salt and oil on a typical 1 gram increment scale.  Re; the salt and oil- the minimum dough recipe that I make is 1450 grams (three 17" pies). When you get into that kind of volume, the margin of error for weighing salt and oil (and sugar) is pretty minimal.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: digital scales
« Reply #31 on: August 21, 2013, 02:24:41 PM »
Chuck,

The post where Brian Spangler discusses his scale is Reply 164 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11994.msg126520/topicseen.html#msg126520. In Brian's case, he is running a business where he is making a highly unique dough with small amounts of yeast and he wants to be sure that his dough is going to be ready as needed day by day. He is not taking chances.

In a casual home setting, I personally use volume measurements for the ingredients used in small amounts. From time to time, I will run experiments where accuracy is important, or where I want to convert a given volume of an ingredient to a weight value, and in those cases I use a small digital scale to weight things. Ingredients also change with changes in weather, humidity, storage and age. And they can lose some of their potency, such as yeast. So, an accurate yeast weight measurement does not compensate for its loss in potency. You can assume a loss of leavening power and adjust the yeast quantity and then weigh it, but I simply increase the volume measurement a bit.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 21, 2013, 06:44:34 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: digital scales
« Reply #32 on: August 21, 2013, 05:58:32 PM »
Thanks guys. 

Offline Chifunda

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Re: digital scales
« Reply #33 on: August 22, 2013, 07:40:54 AM »
I do have a digital and a couple balance beam scales capable of measuring grains or grams, made for meauring gunpowder for reloading ammunition.  I'm just wondering if this is overkill or if getting these down to this level of accuracy is really beneficial?

Never occurred to me that I could use my RCBS reloading scale to weigh ingredients.  "Hmmm, is it my imagination, or does this crust taste kinda like IMR 4064?"  :P


Offline bbqchuck

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Re: digital scales
« Reply #34 on: August 22, 2013, 09:13:10 PM »
Never occurred to me that I could use my RCBS reloading scale to weigh ingredients.  "Hmmm, is it my imagination, or does this crust taste kinda like IMR 4064?"  :P

...with a slight hint of a particularly spicey vintage of 4350 and a whisp of a mild 700X.  :chef: :-D :-D :-D