Author Topic: Advice on dough and cooking times for the perfect Neapolitan delivery pizza  (Read 1983 times)

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Offline Lucca

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Hi Tom (and all),

Hope you can offer your expertise. I am looking to create Neapolitan pizzas for delivery, using a wood fired oven, that are good as (or as near as possible) to the ones served straight out the oven.

Could you offer any advice as to dough and cooking times/methods which can help reduce the negative effects of boxing and standing time.

I would also be grateful for any other advice regarding any good/bad experiences you have all had.

Many Thanks

Kate


Offline scott123

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Kate, imo, there are no "dough and cooking times/methods which can help reduce the negative effects of boxing and standing time" for Neapolitan pizza.  Delivered Neapolitan pizza will never be close to the quality of freshly baked. It's the one style of pizza that travels especially poorly.

If you want to sell the best delivered pizza possible, sell NY style and not Neapolitan.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Kate;
Neapolitan pizzas are a poor choice for a delivery pizza due to their thin crispy bottom crust. It either turns to mush or gets soft and leathery within minutes of going tint the box, not to mention the insulated bag where it will be nicely steamed for nearly 30-minutes. But id you insist: Reduce the oven temperature to 500, not more than 550F, and bake the pizza as long as possible, then place onto a cooling rack for about 60-seconds before boxing and bagging for delivery. This will allow a good deal of the steam to move off of the pizza before packaging. Another option that you have is to package the pizza on an ovenable disk, similar to what is used be Papa Murphy's on their take and bake pizzas, I'm thinking just a flat disk in this case, the consumer is instructed to put the pizza into a HOT oven to dry and re-crisp the pizza. If they'll bake a take and bake pizza, why wouldn't they do this too? As I see it, those are your best shots.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline scott123

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Reduce the oven temperature to 500, not more than 550F, and bake the pizza as long as possible, then place onto a cooling rack for about 60-seconds before boxing and bagging for delivery.

If you lower the temperature to 550, it's no longer Neapolitan pizza, it's NY Style Not to mention, if the recipe is a traditional Neapolitan one with Caputo Pizzeria flour, it will be an especially poor NY Style pizza because Caputo has a tendency to get leathery with lower temps/longer bake times.

Offline Lucca

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Thanks for getting back and the advice. There a quiet a few delivering wood fired "traditional" pizzas in the London area. Will have to do a bit more pizza testing/research.

Cheers

Kate


Offline scott123

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Kate, I've done some consulting with pizzerias South of London, and, from my extensive research, I've  come to a pretty good understanding of British pizza.  No offense, but a lot of it's not that good and very few establishments understand what authentic Neapolitan pizza really is.  Franco Manca (Brixton) is a prominent exception, but, beyond that, I wouldn't turn to too many London area pizzerias as examples to follow. Franco Manca doesn't deliver. They do take away, which, imo, doesn't do justice to the pizza, but, I guess they have to cater to their local demographic, and, in England, take away is a huge market.

My guess is that a lot of these 'traditional' places that deliver aren't really putting out Neapolitan pizzas.  In other words, they're probably only running their wood fired ovens at NY temps. It's one thing for a home baker to make Neapolitan pizzas when their oven is at it's peak and then shift to NY doughs as the temp drops, but, when a commercial pizzeria with a wood fired oven only uses it at lower temps, that's a little tacky. It's a like owning a Ferrari, but never exceeding 55 mph.

Offline Lucca

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Agreed, many are not close. Wanted to stay away from the Franco Manca style as not really into the sough dough option, they don't deliver but they do do  boxed take away option (are we allowed to name names? any way....) Pizza Metro are doing it well and producing both take out and sit in on the same oven at the same temp.

both must also have problems through boxing, just somehow they have the edge....

thanks for your time

Kate

Offline scott123

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Kate, I'm attaching a photo of one of Pizza Metro's pizzas from the gallery on their website.

As you can see, this is definitely not a fast baked authentic Neapolitan pizza. As you extend the bake times, deliverability improves, but, if you're using traditional Caputo pizzeria flour, the potential for toughness increases as well- as I said earlier. If Pizza Metro's crusts are tender, especially after they've cooled a bit during delivery, then not only are they not baking at Neapolitan temps, but they're not using Neapolitan flour either.  In other words, it's most likely just a NY pie with Neapolitan toppings- and not a very good one, imo.

If you really want the best delivered pizza possible, just make a NY style pizza.  They travel almost flawlessly if packaged well.


 

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