Author Topic: Electorlux dlx 2000  (Read 9299 times)

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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #20 on: September 19, 2005, 08:55:15 PM »
I sure hope you didn't follow their pizza dough recipe some years back Bill!

David,

If I recall correctly, the CI pizza dough calls for olive oil. A pizza baker once told me to ignore any dough recipe with anything other than flour, water, yeast, and salt.  I do see may people on this forum making all kinds of doughs with things like oils and sweeteners, so maybe someday I should see what the effect is. I guess you're implying that CI is not a good resource for pizza dough? 

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #21 on: September 19, 2005, 09:16:42 PM »
Bill,

I think what David is referring to is the adverse reaction that the Cook's Illustrated article on pizza a few years ago received from several sources, including theartisan.net, a highly regarded source of information on artisan breads. Their critique makes interesting reading. See http://www.theartisan.net/faux_pas_the_seventh.htm.

Peter

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #22 on: September 19, 2005, 09:28:45 PM »
Peter,

What a great article! Loved every word. Thanks!

Bill/SFNM

Offline Les

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #23 on: September 20, 2005, 02:27:20 AM »
As much as I respect and follow the recommendations of the fine folks at Cooks Illustrated, I think their test criteria may not address the aspects that are most important to pizza dough. Whipping cream and beating eggs and batters are very different tasks from kneading breads which can be very different from kneading some types of pizza dough.

You are really on target with that analysis.  I called quite a few customer service people trying to get opinions on how their mixer handled pizza dough, only to find the closest they could get was bread dough.


Thanks for that "review preview". In my experience, brioche was the toughest test on a mixer. A batch burned up my small KitchenAid. I look forward to their review. 

One has to wonder how Electrolux can claim to make 17 pounds of dough with a 450 watt motor.  Once you see how it works, it becomes clear that the way it is engineered puts relatively little stress on the motor.  The dough spins around and smacks into the roller and scraper; it will get stuck there while the spinning bowl exerts pressure on the dough.  The bowl may spin dozens of times before the dough is pushed past the roller and scraper, so the machine avoids most of the direct stress because of the momentum and gradual effort of the spinning bowl. 

I read a review by someone before I bought mine that they'd had one in their family for 30 years, and it was still working like a champ.  We Americans used to direct force in mixers may find the Electrolux weird (I know I do), but every time I use it I like it more.

Offline David

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #24 on: September 20, 2005, 09:42:20 AM »
Peter,................you've got too much time on your hands ,following me 'round the web! ;)
Actually I had purchased the Cooks illustrated that one and only time,hoping that it would lead me to the Neapolitan holy grail.I threw it out when I moved last year,so couldn't reference it for Bill exactly.I had since read the fine  Artisan "No holds barred" critique-very funny!I have rarely visited that web page,as I found the style in which it is presented seemed that they took themselves a  little too seriously?Maybe it is meant too be somewhat tongue in cheek and I am completely missing it?(strange as I'm from a land weened on sarcasm)However I do respect some of what they say and thanks for jogging my memory about it.I'll re-visit it more often.
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #25 on: September 20, 2005, 12:05:22 PM »
David,

LOL...I think you got the too much time on your hands part right, but this time I found the theartisan.net CI article strictly from memory. I think the folks at theartisan.net are deadly serious about what they write. I like their iconoclastic approach and have read over 90 percent of the content on their site. The site isn't up to date in most places but they have, in the past, taken on sacred cow pizza establishments too. I know it is somewhat off-topic, but they even took on Fleischmann's for recommending that home bakers use high water temperatures (120-130 degrees F) when using their instant dry yeast (IDY) but not recommending the same to professional bakers. You might find the theartisan.net's take on Fleischmann's of interest, from this excerpt from the theartisan.net site:

Although warm rehydration maximizes the performance of instant active dry yeast, companies such as Fleischmann and Red Star suggest that home bakers use water ranging in temperature from 120 to 130, which is excessive. Since, leaching of cell constituents is minimized during rehydration when water is between 70-100 F, using lukewarm to warm water temperature in the dough is advised. 

We have communicated with Fleischmann and have been informed that the vast majority of home baking complaints that Fleischmann receives about yeast failures stem from the dough being either too cold, or held at cold proofing temperatures.  While 120° F.  is certainly excessive for the experienced baker who has control of ingredients, weights, time and temperature, using this temperature does help the inexperienced baker to achieve a faster proof and and to obtain something tangible at the end of the baking process.  It is important to note that Fleischmann's recommendations for their experienced retail and commercial customers are dramatically different, and comport with The Artisan's findings.

Peter

Offline David

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #26 on: September 20, 2005, 01:55:05 PM »
"The site isn't up to date in most places but they have, in the past, taken on sacred cow pizza establishments too. "

Yes,I remember reading that and found it a refreshing review even  in this Desert of Authentic Neapolitan Pizzerias if you know what I mean?"Hell Hath no Fury".............as they say.Definitely iconoclastic.
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Offline scott r

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #27 on: October 04, 2005, 02:20:15 AM »
Apizza, I have not read the cooks illustrated article about the mixers yet, but the Electrolux forum/user group has a brief synopsis:

Just noticed that they have posted the review on line. Electrolux
DLX-2000 Assistent came in dead last as not recommended. The Bosch
Universal Kitchen Machine was last among those recommended with
reservations. Their top choice? KitchenAid Professional 600, followed
closely by DeLonghi DSM5.

After asking more questions of Les in a personal email I have found out his method of getting a low hydration dough out of the Electrolux.   He simply starts with the dry ingredients in the mixer first. He then adds the water to that. 

A few months back at an event put on by Caputo flour I had a chance to try some pizza made by Roberto Caporuscio.  When I asked around about his mixing technique I was told that he used this dry ingredients first method in the spiral mixer that was supplied to him by the event coordinators.  His dough did have a really nice texture. 

I have a feeling that this is not a common way to make Neapolitan dough.  Maybe Marco could chime in with some thoughts on why this might have been done, and any positive or negative effects that this could have on the finished product.

Offline Les

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #28 on: October 04, 2005, 01:27:49 PM »
Scott, I did a lot of research on the Electrolux before I bought it, mainly because I’d already tried two different KA mixers I’d been unhappy with.  The first was the new 600 series, and the second was the Professional Five series.  In both cases the mixer strained when making more than a couple of dough batches at once (and especially when mixing with the “ice method” I use).  I often make several pizzas at once for my friends, so the KA wasn’t a good choice.

I looked at everything under $700, including the Bosch and Viking (the Santos too, but it was too much for my budget and didn’t seem to handle single batches well).

The thing I was surprised to find out about the Electrolux was that I couldn’t find one, single, solitary negative performance review by users!  That definitely was not the case with KA, Viking or Bosch. The one professional review I found, Cook’s Catalogue, had this to say, “Manufactured by Electrolux of Sweden, this unit is a bread baker’s dream and an investment that will last a lifetime.”

The only negative thing I saw wasn't about performance, but complaints about the poor instructions that come with the Electrolux.  The problem you’ve had figuring out the arm needs to be adjusted to the left while adjusting the speed, is apparently a common one.  Here’s one reviewer’s frustration, “My 1st experience w/ this DLX is how can it be this much $$$ and offer no direction on how to use??? I called their C.S. & they gave me a TOLL call # to reach for help and that man (Mr. Ross) was about as helpful as someone who is offering directions while speaking a foriegn language! Since I had no directions I plucked a recipe out of one of my books and the DLX bowl spun around in circles while my dough just sat there doing nothing. I had to use a spoon to get it to move! I will give this DLX 1 more chance and if still doesn't knead.”

But then the next reviewer explained, “Previous reviewer stated ‘where is the recipe book and guidance.’ Answer to that question is, other than a very few receipes there is none. However, the machine is easy to figure out once you understand it's mixing concept. When in doubt, place adjustable arm all the way out & then increase speed while slowly readjusting arm inward until desired mixing achieved. [bold emphasis added] Really very simple once you get the hang of it.  Mixer it'self is terrific, will do anything & everything but stand on it's head and gargle peanut butter.”

If you read the rest of the reviews on this page . . .
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0000DDWAD/?tag=pizzamaking-20
. . . you will see the continued praise.

A couple of forum discussions I found about the best mixer to buy were interesting because after the pros and cons of the Bosch, Kenwood, DeLongi, and KA, once the subject of the Electrolux came up, the praise was again totally positive.  In the discussion here  . . .
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/appl/msg091711221951.html
. . . after they get to the commentator “snowbaby” she says, “I have owned 3 Kitchenaid mixers, the Kenwood (now Delonghi), and now an Electrolux DLX. I was very happy with my first Kitchenaid and it served me well for 15-20 years, but it didn't handle large batches well. Even an angel food cake would nearly overflow the bowl. The Kenwood (smaller size) did a good job for about 8-10 years. It was very noisey, but it kneaded double batches of bread and even mixed large batches of fruitcake. Then it broke, and the part took 6 months to come in. When it broke the second time I chucked it."

She continues, “The Electrolux I have now is a dream machine! It was low rated by the LA Times article, but I can't help but think that they didn't read the manual. For them, it failed to cream butter and sugar. It does a perfect job for me. Let me say that it doesn't work like any mixer I have ever before used. You must spend 15-20 minutes reading about how to use it! I worried that it would be too complicated, but it isn't at all. I can make 6-7 loaves of bread at a time (at Christmas), or 1 loaf. The loaves are much more like homemade bread (finer crumb)than from a bread maker. The only thing I haven't figured out, is how to use it for pie crust (Kenwood was great), so I will use my food processor for that. The Electrolux is highly recommended by many professional chefs (see link below.) New Kitchenaid mixers are for the most part, not reliable for serious bakers. I urge you to read the thread below if you want a mixer that will perform well on all tasks (except pie dough?)”

The link she gave was to another forum . . .
http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=57963
. . . which was a discussion about KAs the members had owned.  Again the many stories of the how the old KAs had been great, but the new ones weren’t so hot.  Plus the problem of being able to make large batches.  After about 13 posts the member “andiesenji” steps in with his/her experience with KA, Hobart, etc. and then says “I bought the Electrolux which was called AEG at that time and it will do everything I ask of a mixer, including kneading the Struan dough (Peter Reinhart's recipe) and the thickest of cookie dough.  And in the second bowl, it will whip eggwhites and cream to incredible volume with its double whips. I have recommended it to several people and everyone who has bought it has been very happy with it.”  Again the discussion turns toward Electrolux as the overlooked mixer to buy.

This kind of opinion has been the only type I have found about the Electrolux by users.  So why did Cook’s Illustrated rate it lowest on the list?  I can’t get access to the review without re-subscribing, so I have to speculate from my past experience with Cook’s Magazine.  I dropped my subscription to it because I felt their reviews were topical (i.e., they didn’t test things in enough different situations and over enough time), and they didn’t recommend based on excellence.  It seemed to me they made price too much of a factor, which I think should be left up to the buyer.  I’d prefer a review to stick to what functions best, and then I’ll decide if I want to pay the price for it (obviously within some type of price range).  I remember a bread knife comparison they did where in the end they recommended a stamped Forschner knife over forged knives.  I bought it on their recommendation; it’s sharp alright, but using a floppy-bladed knife that is too light is scary.  After cutting myself a couple of times I went ahead and spent the money for my beloved Wusthof Grand Prix.

Another problem I see for aspiring pizziolos is that mixer reviews are for normal batter-type mixing, while pizza dough puts more stress on a machine.  So for me the issue boils down to 1) what’s the most durable, effective machine I can get for pizza dough in my price range, and 2) can the machine do both single and multiple batches of dough.

I made my final decision after talking to an experienced baker here . . .
http://kodiakhealth.com/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/3370
. . . who also sold them for that company (that’s where I ended up buying my machine).  She said she owned both the top Bosch and the Electrolux, but the Bosch didn’t do single batches.  I could tell from the way she talked she really liked the Electrolux best (she sold both machines so couldn’t let herself sound too biased).  They had the best price for the metallic grey machine, and sent out my mixer that day.  From the start the machine worked better than either of the KAs had, even before I learned how to use it properly.  But once I did learn how, I was totally impressed with the quality of the dough.  I wouldn’t have thought a particular mixing method would make so much difference.  Plus the way it is made is really impressive.  Solid as a rock, smooth, powerful, every part made well.

So at this point, I don’t think there is anything that can compete with the Electrolux for pizza dough under $1000.

Offline David

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #29 on: October 04, 2005, 02:32:47 PM »

 
scott r
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    Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #27 on: Today at 02:20:15 AM »   



"After asking more questions of Les in a personal email I have found out his method of getting a low hydration dough out of the Electrolux.   He simply starts with the dry ingredients in the mixer first. He then adds the water to that. 

A few months back at an event put on by Caputo flour I had a chance to try some pizza made by Roberto Caporuscio.  When I asked around about his mixing technique I was told that he used this dry ingredients first method in the spiral mixer that was supplied to him by the event coordinators.  His dough did have a really nice texture. "

Scott,
I was taught this method also by a professional instructor and believe it to be a common method taught in Culinary Institutions ,however,almost every operator I've spoken to and watched  has done the opposite and put the water in first?Hopefully Marco will expand on this,and the possible Geographical differences/reasoning behind the two schools of thought.I was given the reasoning that the Dough Hydration could be better controlled/adjusted by adding the liquids to the dry ingredients?I may be wrong,but I recall reading somewhere that Roberto Caporuscio is a graduate of a VPN course in Naples.
                                                                 
 
 
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Offline pizzanapoletana

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #30 on: October 04, 2005, 04:49:48 PM »
Roberto Caporuscio

Has a VPN certificate, but I would not read too much into that. Also if Roberto or anyone else has a VPN certificate, and then does something that doesn't reflect that, doesn't mean that this is what tradition or best practices have been passed on. Actually most likely, it is the lack of experience, that a one week course with end certificate (for which you are charged anyway a lot of money), cannot fullifill, that make people use some different methods.

There is technical reasons behind starting with the water first or the flour.

This will affect absorbtion, oxidation, increase the strenght of the flour, maturation time, dough fermentation and maturation, and many others.

Instead of me telling you the answers once again, I think that would be more of a learning point for you, if you would experiment and then come up with your own conclusions

Ciao

Offline scott r

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #31 on: October 05, 2005, 12:54:47 AM »
Because I am so happy with my crust using the electrolux and the water first method, I am not sure I really want to mess with switching things up right now.    For now I am more concerned with maximizing my results using my current recipe.  If I do get around to trying the dry ingredients first technique I will report.  Lately I have been really winging it with hydration percentages and mix times, and I want to try to get things nailed down a little more on that end.

Yesterday I made three batches of dough with the same exact precisely weighed ingredients, Caputo flour, Ishca starter, water and salt.  I did everything I could to keep every mix exactly the same except for how fast I added my flour to the mixer.  I started each batch with exactly half the flour from a 64% hydration recipe.  I continuously added the remaining flour from each recipe, with the first mix lasting 20 minutes, the second mix lasting 15 minutes, and the third mix lasting 10 minutes.  I let the dough ferment for 24 hours in a small room with an air conditioner in it. 

I have come to realize that my oven technique is possibly the hugest factor in the inconsistencies between pies.  An extra few degrees of heat, or a few extra seconds in the oven can totally make two pizzas made from the same batch of dough turn out quite different.  To try to avoid this variable I made three mini pizzas with 100g dough balls.  Surprisingly the heat in my oven is really distributed quite evenly at 750 degrees, so I though it might keep things a little more scientific if I cooked all three pizzas on the same stone at the same time.

I was somewhat surprised at my results.  I expected the 10 minute mix to have the largest voids, but it was actually the most dense pie of the three.  The 15 minute pie was my favorite, with the largest voids.  This pie actually looked taller than the other two even though it weighed the same, and was the exact same size. The 20 minute pie was very similar to the 15 minute one.  It was hard to notice a big difference, but it did have a slightly tighter crumb and rose a little less.

I do realize that the status of my starter could be a factor.  I made my first batch of dough just as the starter had stopped growing.  By the time I made the third batch of dough it was about an hour later than the first batch.  In retrospect, I wish I had some IDY around to make this experiment more even.  I do think I remember Jeff Varasano coming to a similar conclusion, with a 15 minute total mix time being his favorite.  Obviously he is doing a different thing with the multiple rest periods, but it is nice to know that we have come up with similar ultimate mix times for the Electrolux and a Neapolitan style dough.

Now If I was really a good scientist, I would repeat this test a few times....... Right Peter?

P.S.  does this make sense to anyone that the short mix time dough would be the most dense?

Offline David

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #32 on: October 05, 2005, 10:46:36 AM »
Well, like you Scott,I follow the water first regime even though I was introduced to Pizza Dough making using the opposite,just as I was taught never to mix the salt and yeast many years ago.I have no idea what method the VPN teach,so I was really adding that comment more as a question,regardless of how he decides to make his dough on any given day.I made my Pizza following that method for some time and I thought my Pizza as fairly good,but it was not the pizza that I personally dreamed about and wanted to achieve (The one I had in Naples in the 70's!) I agree with Marco and others on this forum that a week in a Pizza Class can not make you a Pizzaiolo.The thing it does do however IMO  is open your eyes to understanding a little bit of why you do things and why certain outcomes happen.I'm almost certain than many pizzeria operators have no idea of the temperature of their ingredients for example,and simply follow the instructions passed on to them over the years.The Dough is made by the exact same technique everyday and no one really understands why-it's just the way things are done.IMO by understanding the Science (something I always hated at school ) you are better equipped to prepare and adjust the outcome of your final product.As the renowned people at Da Michelle have said "There are no secrets to making Pizza - just experience".
After two years at Culinary school,one of my Instructors said to me " Good luck,and now go out and learn to be a Chef ! "
I believe that making Great pizza is about having the right ingredients,the right technique,and the right passion.If you are missing any one of those factors,then your pizza will suffer.
We do not have the benefit of working alongside someone with years of experience in Naples,but we now can enjoy the wealth of knowledge that is shared over the internet,which I'm sure has educated people and improved their skills by leaps and bounds in a relatively short time.I don't have the answers yet,but here's few thoughts.
By Giottos account the shorter mix worked well for bread if I recall-but we are not making bread?
Maybe the way you formed / opened up each dough ball has altered the cornicone ?Maybe the age of the Flour?Maybe the temperature of your water / flour / Electrolux changed?Maybe I'm thinking too much about this..................
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Offline apizza

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #33 on: October 05, 2005, 08:43:15 PM »
Thank you Scott for the preliminary info on the review. Somewhat dissappointing. Guess I'll spring for CI when it comes out. Curious to see how they came to their conclusions.
As I said I put more weight on everyday users and must agree with Les that I too have not found any reports that do not praise this mixer. At this time I do not see a negative review from CI changing my mind about a future purchase. I hope some members who own this mixer will comment on the CI review after they read the full article.

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #34 on: October 05, 2005, 08:58:27 PM »
I'm not sure I'd buy the CI issue just for the review. They mention the pizza dough test, but don't say anything about the nature of the dough which as we all know from this forum can range from tender to stiff with widely variable kneading speeds and times. As I mentioned before, I am a big fan of CI, but I can't see how they can address the power and kneading action issues of different pizza doughs.

I found the article unhelpful. I also think you may need to consider different mixers for different tasks. What I use for making a cake is not what use for making breads.

Bill/SFNM

Offline scott r

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #35 on: October 06, 2005, 12:20:16 AM »

Maybe the way you formed / opened up each dough ball has altered the cornicone ?Maybe the age of the Flour?Maybe the temperature of your water / flour / Electrolux changed?Maybe I'm thinking too much about this..................

Quote

I tried my best to open each of the dough balls the same way, but that could be it.  This is the only real variable that I can see other than the starter having an extra hour on it.   In my early days on the forum I do think I remember reading that severe underkneading could cause a somewhat dense crust as well as over kneading.  I think the only thing I can do now is just repeat the test and see what happens.

The most important thing here is that I now feel confident that a 15 minute knead for a batch of dough that starts with a half liter of water in the electrolux is a good time to shoot for.

Offline Les

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #36 on: November 28, 2005, 12:04:44 PM »
Here's a new trick I've learned with the Electrolux.  Because about 2/3 of my hydration is made up of crushed ice, it makes the dough unflexible for most of the knead.  I found that by manually holding the scraper out from the bowl when the dough passed the roller, the dough was forced behind the scraper to create a full kneading action.  I decided to see if rubber bands could hold the scraper properly, and they did with no problem.  In fact, I took off one of the two I had attached and it worked even better.  I find I have to attend to the Electrolux throughout the kneading process, but I don't mind since it yields awesome dough.

Offline Hi Gluten

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #37 on: January 22, 2006, 06:05:46 PM »
Nice tips Les!

I have a little tip/trick that I use when making low hydration pizza dough...

I will start out with the dry ingredients and then slowly add cold water to the mixer. When it just starts to come together, I will add the oil (if the recipe calls for it). Then once kneaded for a moment or two, I will let it rest for 20-30 minutes.

When I'm ready to start the kneading process in earnest, I take off the scraper blade. I will then carefully take small pieces off a paper towel sheet. Then I twist the paper and insert it into the hole for the scraper. What it does is raise the level of the scraper. Now when the mixer is started the dough gets caught in the scraper and is then forced to go under the blade. This cuts the dough and gives me a better kneed. Afterwards, you can remove the paper towel with a long thin needle nose pliers.

I have found this a simple technique to improve the capabilities of the machine. Works well with small batches too.  :chef:
« Last Edit: January 22, 2006, 10:34:32 PM by Hi Gluten »

Offline Les

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #38 on: January 26, 2006, 03:21:17 AM »
Nice tips Les!

I have a little tip/trick that I use when making low hydration pizza dough...

I will start out with the dry ingredients and then slowly add cold water to the mixer. When it just starts to come together, I will add the oil (if the recipe calls for it). Then once kneaded for a moment or two, I will let it rest for 20-30 minutes.

When I'm ready to start the kneading process in earnest, I take off the scraper blade. I will then carefully take small pieces off a paper towel sheet. Then I twist the paper and insert it into the hole for the scraper. What it does is raise the level of the scraper. Now when the mixer is started the dough gets caught in the scraper and is then forced to go under the blade. This cuts the dough and gives me a better kneed. Afterwards, you can remove the paper towel with a long thin needle nose pliers.

I have found this a simple technique to improve the capabilities of the machine. Works well with small batches too.  :chef:

Cool.  I had the same idea and have been trying to figure out how to raise that scraper!  Thanks for the tip.  Too bad Electrolux can't use these ideas to design a couple more adjustment controls into their machine; it would allow us to let the machine work by itself better.  As I said above, I have to help it out most of the time it's making dough.

Offline Hi Gluten

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Re: Electorlux dlx 2000
« Reply #39 on: February 06, 2006, 09:59:53 AM »
I have a new technique that I stumbled on last week...

I was going to make dough for the weekend and noticed I had a little bit of "Trumps" flour leftover in the bag. So, I decided to make a dough out the small amount of flour left in the bag. I wanted to do this for two reasons; I wanted to get rid of the Trumps before I open a new bag and I wanted to see how small of a batch the DLX can handle.

I did this one by eye, so please don't ask for quantities. I put the flour in the bowl (which was chilled). Then added some salt and yeast (all by eye). Turned on the machine and started to add cold water. Everything started OK. The dough started to form into a ball. Then the dough didn't want to go under the scraper blade. I decided to lower the scraper by taking out the paper towel shims. Still no good. The dough was all over the bottom of the bowl. I had no other choice but to use a large Rubbermaid spatula while the bowl was in motion. It worked beautifully! The small dough ball gravitated toward the center of the bowl and I used the spatula to actually cut and knead the dough. Since the center of the bowl rotates quicker than the outer sides, it worked most effectively. I then stopped the machine and removed both the scraper and roller from the bowl. I turned the machine back on and continued the kneading process using the spatula. By changing both the pressure and angle of the spatula, I was able to get great results from this method. Next time I make a smaller batch of dough, I am only going to use the spatula only method. It provides greater control and allows the capability to do very small batches easily without constant resetting of the roller.

Serendipity? "Necessity is the mother of invention"?  YES!!! It's funny how such as simple action turns into a new "modus operandi"!

I enjoy the many facets of this machine. Now I have new technique to add to my repertoire.

 :chef:  :pizza:
« Last Edit: February 06, 2006, 10:04:36 AM by Hi Gluten »


 

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