Author Topic: Question, about how two doughs mixed together became okay?  (Read 783 times)

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Offline norma427

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Question, about how two doughs mixed together became okay?
« on: September 07, 2011, 11:02:14 PM »
Tom,

I wanted to ask you a question about some dough balls I had leftover.  The dough balls were regular Lehmann dough balls and Preferment Lehmann dough balls, that were submerged in ice water and really didnít look well, but I had put them into my deli case for a day and then commingled them, by kneading them together.  I just wanted to see what would happen.  The dough mass of the commingled doughs became very tight, but I did cut and ball the tight dough, cold fermented them for about a day, and then used all of them but one.  They seemed to work out well.  Do you have any explanations for how the dough balls became okay?

This is where I posted about the dough being commingled at Reply 922 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9908.msg152121.html#msg152121
And  Reply 925 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9908.msg152240.html#msg152240

I hadnít read your post on PMQTT before I commingled the dough balls.  Peter hunted down your post in his Reply at 934 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9908.msg152274.html#msg152274

I am just curious what you would say.

Norma
« Last Edit: September 07, 2011, 11:04:20 PM by norma427 »
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Offline norma427

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Re: Question, about how two doughs mixed together became okay?
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2011, 08:00:15 AM »
Tom,

I don't know if you saw this post are not, or if you think Peter's explanation of why the doughs worked that were commingled was spot on, but still would be interested in hearing your opinion.

Thanks!

Norma
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Question, about how two doughs mixed together became okay?
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2011, 09:39:22 AM »
Norma;
When you first mixed the two doughs together the resulting dough became what we call very "bucky", meaning tight and elastic. You can see this very same thing happening if you take a dough ball that is properly fermented and re-round it just before trying to open it into a dough skin. When you allowed the dough to continue fermenting the gluten relaxed due to exposure to the acids and enzymes of fermentation, thus allowing the dough to become soft and extensible once again. This is why we always say to never re-round the dough balls just prior to opening them into skins.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline norma427

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Re: Question, about how two doughs mixed together became okay?
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2011, 11:13:27 AM »
Norma;
When you first mixed the two doughs together the resulting dough became what we call very "bucky", meaning tight and elastic. You can see this very same thing happening if you take a dough ball that is properly fermented and re-round it just before trying to open it into a dough skin. When you allowed the dough to continue fermenting the gluten relaxed due to exposure to the acids and enzymes of fermentation, thus allowing the dough to become soft and extensible once again. This is why we always say to never re-round the dough balls just prior to opening them into skins.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom,

Thanks so much for your explanations on why my dough balls were useable.  I have seen before when I tried to reball a dough ball to soon before opening it, or even reballed too much, the dough couldnít be opened right.

I always appreciate your help!  :)

Norma
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