Author Topic: My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time  (Read 1967 times)

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Offline Martino1

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My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time
« on: September 17, 2011, 11:37:46 AM »
Not sure whether anyone finds this interesting, but I have been using my new vegetable mill for some while and would like to share how i use it, because it helped my tomato sauce on a different level. Sorry if it is a bit lengthy.
I bought the mill after seeing the video of the Training session with R. Caporuscio.


He just dumps the whole can in a mill and that's it (07:20 min in the video). The advantage over a blender, according to him is, that the sauce does not get too soupy and has a consistent texture whoever does it.

Reading Jeff V's site I found his approach to the sauce very interesting. I agreed and also to my taste tomato seeds are bitter and I would not allow them to be guest on my Pizza. This is really my taste only, others might find them quite desirable. I did not follow Jeffs method to rinse the tomatoes though. (at least not yet). I also strive to remove the tin tasting water.

However, I tried two quite similar approaches with the same tomatoe brand and came to evenly satisfying results. I tried the results blind folded and fed by my wife  ;) . I wasn't able to tell the difference.

The difference is though: Approach No. 2 just takes 20% of the time of Method 1.

Method 1:
- open can, take the tomatoes into a separate bowl
- cut them at the side and use your fingers to rub the seeds into the liquid. also dip the tomatoes in the liquid to get rid of the seeds
- now push the remaining liquid through a fine strainer and put the outcome to the cleaned tomatoes
- strain the whole again to remove the unwanted tinny (?) water
- process through food mill

Method 2:
- use a bowl, put a fine mesh strainer on top and then put the vegetable mill on top
- dump the whole can in and process it
- the puree will fall into the strainer and the water goes through to the pot
- the seeds, stems and skin of the tomatoe stays in the mill
- then i slowly turn the strainer to all sides evenly distributing the puree in the strainer. By then, the bitter and tin tasting water went through
- scoop the puree out of the strainer and finished.

I did not experience any loss in tomato solids. I strained the remaining water through the fine mesh again and no solids inside, so I think there was no loss of the good stuff. All the seeds, stems and skin stay in in the food mill. You don't want to have this on your pizza, so also no loss of good tomato taste.

This takes only 5 minutes and the texture of the puree is exactly how i like it.

I finish the tomato sauce with lemon, which IMO adds to the freshness of the sauce, with sea salt, 1 teaspoon brown sugar and a hint of paprika and garlic powder.

I hope this is of use for someone of you. Any question I'd gladly answer.
Pizza is the only dish perfect for breakfast, lunch, tea, dinner, late night snack ;-)


Offline Martino1

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Re: My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2011, 11:49:28 AM »
... at the end, the liquid that I dumped was having no tomato substance and tinny tasting water. So there is almost no loss of the good stuff (see last pic where I tried to strain the water again. Nothing in the fine strainer, means only water).

« Last Edit: September 17, 2011, 12:59:43 PM by Martino1 »
Pizza is the only dish perfect for breakfast, lunch, tea, dinner, late night snack ;-)

Offline petef

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Re: My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2011, 12:16:34 PM »
Thanks for posting the pics which help a lot to understanding your process. I see now that you use the fine screen strainer to allow the watery portion to drain off. I'll have to try that method instead of my current method where I cook the sauce down over low heat to get rid of the excess water.

My food mill has various screen sizes ranging from approximately 1/16" to 1/8" to 1/4" holes. I usually use the one with 1/8" holes. What size holes does your food mill screen have?

Edit: Opps, I just viewed your pics again and see that you probably use a screen with 1/16" holes.

---pete---
« Last Edit: September 17, 2011, 12:18:50 PM by petef »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2011, 12:31:20 PM »
Martin, I bought an very similar tomato mill recently made by OXO.  My process is very similar to yours.  I basically take a hand blend to the tomatoes to pulse them down a bit, then mill, then screen to get desired consistency.   Nice job on posting the pics as so many of us are visual learners.

What also helps me get the most pulp and juice out is to turn the mill clockwise for awhile, then switch directions to CCW, and then CW again.   That seems to help pack the seeds and skins tightly together to help squeeze out all the juices.  I also run a spatula to the underside of the screen to wipe off the pulp that collects there.

Chau
« Last Edit: September 17, 2011, 12:33:10 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Martino1

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Re: My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2011, 12:52:31 PM »
Pete,
I use a very fine mesh strainer, which does not allow the puree to go through. Only the water. With the spoon i can get out the puree without the bitter water.

Actually i had pizze which had this wonderful intensive tomato taste and i assumed the sauce must have been cooked. I tried as well to cook it, but never got this intensive tomato flavor. I thought that are the tomatoes i use, so i tried to cook them longer, to mix it with tomato concentrate or i exaggerated on spices. Nothing came close to this simple but yet intensive tomato flavor.

Now i am back to the less-is-more principle. No cooking, just removing the seeds, stems and all yellowish tasteless parts with the mill. Then not a lot of spices or concentrate, but the lemon juice really does it for me. If not overdone it brings out the freshness and with a bit of sugar intensifies the sweetness.
i also dont cook the sauce as many on this forum because i use italian pelati which are already cooked once.
Together with the milk flavor of the chees i made a step forward in improving the taste.

Chau, i also turn counterwise. I am just a bit afraid, that if i overdo it, i will finally grind the unwanted parts into the sauce. I checked the remaining trester in the mill and i couldnt squeeze anything out of it anymore.
Important point you mention is not to forget the underside after the milling.
I still get the small seeds, but they don't taste bitter, so i don't mind.

Has anyone seen the divella brand tomatoes ? It's the best i can get here in Vietnam. if i ask for San Marzano they would probably send me to a church. I also use the typo 00 pizzaria flour from this brand mixed with local HG bread flower. Unfortunately, no fresh yeast here but i hope my ischia starter is on the way and the customs department of VN will not discard it  :-\
« Last Edit: September 17, 2011, 12:55:38 PM by Martino1 »
Pizza is the only dish perfect for breakfast, lunch, tea, dinner, late night snack ;-)

Offline Martino1

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Re: My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2011, 01:05:40 PM »

My food mill has various screen sizes ranging from approximately 1/16" to 1/8" to 1/4" holes. I usually use the one with 1/8" holes. What size holes does your food mill screen have?

Edit: Opps, I just viewed your pics again and see that you probably use a screen with 1/16" holes.

---pete---


Hey Pete, my Fissler mill came with two screens and i am using the smallest (probably 1-2 mm). I found it is not too small to produce a soup and if i use the larger one, then the puree will get more stems, seeds etc. Milled through. after some tests, i think the smaller is ok, but i use a fine strainer. I also turn the puree in the strainer to quickly drain all the water, but i do not push it through, since i guess i would lose some tomato solids as well.

Pizza is the only dish perfect for breakfast, lunch, tea, dinner, late night snack ;-)

Offline petef

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Re: My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2011, 04:40:31 PM »
Now i am back to the less-is-more principle. No cooking, just removing the seeds, stems and all yellowish tasteless parts with the mill. Then not a lot of spices or concentrate, but the lemon juice really does it for me. If not overdone it brings out the freshness and with a bit of sugar intensifies the sweetness.

I think you are right. When it comes to pizza sauce, less is more. I'm also finding a basic principal in cooking where acidic flavor is desired many recipes benefit by adding sweetener to balance out the acidity. For me, this was the trick in getting my perfect pizza sauce as well as my perfect Cole Slaw dressing and also my BBQ Ribs sauce as well as my Hot Wing sauce. So your lemon juice with a bit of sweetener makes perfect sense to me.

Again, excellent post with your detailed description and all the great pics!

---pete---

Offline Martino1

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Re: My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2011, 09:17:29 PM »
Thanks pete. Love chicken wicks with slight acidic taste. For me it is actually true when i say, i went to hooters, i just did it for the wings !  :P
Pizza is the only dish perfect for breakfast, lunch, tea, dinner, late night snack ;-)

Offline petef

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Re: My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2011, 09:57:13 PM »
Thanks pete. Love chicken wicks with slight acidic taste. For me it is actually true when i say, i went to hooters, i just did it for the wings !  :P

Care to share wing sauce recipes? 

I never really measure, but here goes..

I take a small glass container about the size that fits one wing (6 ounces) and add about 1 tablespoon of butter. I then squeeze out enough Ketchup to cover the butter. I then top it off with a good amount of red hot pepper sauce. Add a few squirts of Tobasco sauce, some lemon juice, a couple of drops of honey, about 1/2 teaspoon Molasses, sprinkle in some finely ground red hot Cheyenne pepper. Microwave it in about 15 second  intervals until the butter is melted and stir well.

I cook the wings on the gas grill until golden brown and dip them in the sauce to thoroughly coat them.

I like em really HOT & SPICY!

---pete---


Offline Martino1

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Re: My experience with the mill, saved me lots of time
« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2011, 11:26:29 PM »
Mmhhh... Thanks Pete. Good to have another bbq recipe, so I can report to my wife, that On the grill we bought for a fortuna I can do something else than Pizza  :-D
Seriously ... I will try that. Thanks
Pizza is the only dish perfect for breakfast, lunch, tea, dinner, late night snack ;-)