Author Topic: Tomato Sauce Tonight  (Read 14361 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #100 on: August 19, 2011, 08:17:54 AM »
More, Les's sauce..lol  Since I have so many tomatoes ripening now, I usually make Les's sauce a couple of times a week.  I have found at least I now like Les's sauce a little more chunky, so I process it less in the food processor.  The pictures don't show justice to how red the sauce really was, because when I was finished it was dark and my camera doesn't take the best pictures when it is darker.

Tonight, Les's sauce was for quick thrown together spaghetti and some leftover to freeze.  I used a whole head of garlic this time for the bake, and also used Walmart's brand of crushed tomatoes.

Norma



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Offline norma427

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #101 on: August 19, 2011, 08:18:41 AM »
Norma
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Offline petef

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #102 on: August 21, 2011, 12:53:13 AM »
I think you are right about tomatoes losing flavor when place in the refrigerator.  :)  I have noticed that many times, so I usually try to use my tomatoes while they still can be used at room temperature.  

In my experiences and opinion, I can still get a great tasting sauce if they are frozen.  If I have leftover sauce from market, I do freeze it.  It doesn't seem to loose flavor, when it is defrosted.  I have a freezer that doesn't recycle, so I don't know if that make a difference or not, but see that it can.  The only difference I can see if the tomato sauce is cooked.  Then it can change the flavor of the sauce.  When baking tomatoes, like Les does, then I think the tomatoes keep their original sweet natural flavor.  At least that is what I found, from trying his recipe different times.

I have had the same experience as described above...
* Whole Tomatoes have better taste if NOT refrigerated.
* Frozen sauce does not lose any flavor.
* Cooking changes flavor.

I'm still wondering if it enhances flavor to allow fresh picked red tomatoes to ripen at room temperature to the point where they begin to get soft with spots on them just before getting rotten. The goal being to get that deep red ripe appearance when you cut them open. As opposed to using them when fresh and firm, cutting them open and seeing some white areas or less than deep red in appearance.

I'm also wondering if the liquefied tomatoes processed via food mill lose their flavor if refrigerated. My impression is that they don't lose their flavor. I typically refrigerate my liquefied tomatoes for 4 to 24 hours and then cook them down about 50% to get the the desired saucy consistency.  The flavor is great.

I'm also wondering how long I could leave the liquefied tomatoes out at room temperature to do a comparison taste test between the same batch that is refrigerated.

Anyone know about these things?



Offline norma427

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #103 on: August 21, 2011, 07:40:24 AM »
I have had the same experience as described above...
* Whole Tomatoes have better taste if NOT refrigerated.
* Frozen sauce does not lose any flavor.
* Cooking changes flavor.

I'm still wondering if it enhances flavor to allow fresh picked red tomatoes to ripen at room temperature to the point where they begin to get soft with spots on them just before getting rotten. The goal being to get that deep red ripe appearance when you cut them open. As opposed to using them when fresh and firm, cutting them open and seeing some white areas or less than deep red in appearance.

I'm also wondering if the liquefied tomatoes processed via food mill lose their flavor if refrigerated. My impression is that they don't lose their flavor. I typically refrigerate my liquefied tomatoes for 4 to 24 hours and then cook them down about 50% to get the the desired saucy consistency.  The flavor is great.

I'm also wondering how long I could leave the liquefied tomatoes out at room temperature to do a comparison taste test between the same batch that is refrigerated.

Anyone know about these things?





Pete,

Those are some good questions you posed. I donít know the answers to your questions, but maybe other members do.

All I do know is after the tomatoes are slow baked, using Lesís method, they still retain their fresh taste, but even get sweeter. After the sauce is made, it stays fresh tasting while in the refrigerator.

This website shows some about tomatoes, and when and how to use fresh tomatoes, but I am sure there are many more websites that give more information. http://www.tomatodirt.com/tomato-recipes.html


Norma
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Offline petef

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #104 on: August 21, 2011, 09:42:46 AM »
All I do know is after the tomatoes are slow baked, using Lesís method, they still retain their fresh taste, but even get sweeter. After the sauce is made, it stays fresh tasting while in the refrigerator.


Thanks, I'll definitely try Les's method. It makes sense just as in regular cooking when you cook down a sauce in a pan the water boils out and the taste intensifies.

Quote
This website shows some about tomatoes, and when and how to use fresh tomatoes, but I am sure there are many more websites that give more information. http://www.tomatodirt.com/tomato-recipes.html


Great site all about tomatoes!  They seem to answer my one question about taste versus degrees or ripeness after harvested... Excerpt...  "But tomato flavor develops only when the fruit is on the vine. A tomatoís sugars, acids, and aromas stop developing once itís harvested."

Norma, I've heard the above statement before, but I can't help to think that the flavor changes when it goes from an unripe firm state to soft and deep red. Sounds like a job for America's Test Kitchen taste testing group. :)

---pete---



« Last Edit: August 21, 2011, 09:44:17 AM by petef »

Offline norma427

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #105 on: August 21, 2011, 12:04:51 PM »


Norma, I've heard the above statement before, but I can't help to think that the flavor changes when it goes from an unripe firm state to soft and deep red. Sounds like a job for America's Test Kitchen taste testing group. :)

---pete---



Pete,

I also believe the flavor or tomatoes change, when it goes from an unripe firm state to soft and deep red, but I havenít done any tests on that.  I think that is why shipped tomatoes taste much different than one freshly picked, but I donít know.

If you look at the first picture, I provided in Reply 100 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11539.msg150137.html#msg150137  it can be seen I have some tomatoes on my picnic table that arenít ripe.  I picked those because either they dropped off while I was picking ripened fresh red ones, or because I didnít want the groundhogs to eat the ones close to the ground.  When they ripen and I use them for something, I will taste them to see if they are different from ones that were ripen the whole way on the vine.  Maybe you want to start a thread about how home grown tomatoes taste, using different methods, and if green or partly ripe tomatoes, taste different than tomatoes ripened the whole way on the vine.

Norma
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Offline petef

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #106 on: August 21, 2011, 09:46:50 PM »
Pete,

I also believe the flavor or tomatoes change, when it goes from an unripe firm state to soft and deep red, but I havenít done any tests on that.  I think that is why shipped tomatoes taste much different than one freshly picked, but I donít know.


Right, and that's what the article you linked to talked about. Most store bought tomatoes that are shipped a great distance are picked while green and ripened later. Some are ripened using a gas. The theory they stated is that that the flavor only develops while on the vine. HOWEVER, I find it hard to believe that a green tomato eaten immediately after picked tastes the same as a gas ripened red one from the very same plant.

Quote
If you look at the first picture, I provided in Reply 100 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11539.msg150137.html#msg150137  it can be seen I have some tomatoes on my picnic table that arenít ripe.  I picked those because either they dropped off while I was picking ripened fresh red ones, or because I didnít want the groundhogs to eat the ones close to the ground.  When they ripen and I use them for something........


Yes, practically speaking we gardeners have a common problem. For a variety of reasons, our tomatoes don't all ripen at the same time. We wind up with ones that have been harvested, some very ripe and some not so ripe. This is why I'd like to find out if refrigerating processed liquefied tomatoes has a large effect on taste. Hopefully not, because that would allow us to process our harvest in smaller batches, when optimally ripe, and simply add them to the batch already in the refrigerator.

---pete---

Offline norma427

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #107 on: August 22, 2011, 05:22:42 AM »
Right, and that's what the article you linked to talked about. Most store bought tomatoes that are shipped a great distance are picked while green and ripened later. Some are ripened using a gas. The theory they stated is that that the flavor only develops while on the vine. HOWEVER, I find it hard to believe that a green tomato eaten immediately after picked tastes the same as a gas ripened red one from the very same plant.

Yes, practically speaking we gardeners have a common problem. For a variety of reasons, our tomatoes don't all ripen at the same time. We wind up with ones that have been harvested, some very ripe and some not so ripe. This is why I'd like to find out if refrigerating processed liquefied tomatoes has a large effect on taste. Hopefully not, because that would allow us to process our harvest in smaller batches, when optimally ripe, and simply add them to the batch already in the refrigerator.

---pete---

Pete,

I agree with you, that it is hard to believe that a green tomato eaten immediately after it is picked tastes the same as a gas ripened red one from the very same plant.  I did eat fried green tomatoes before, but never tasted a plain green tomato.

Good luck in your tests, to see if refrigerating does have a large effect on the taste.  :) If you want me to do any tests on my tomatoes, I will.  Just let me know what you want me to do.  The problem I would have in trying to do tests is I donít own a food mill.

Norma
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Offline petef

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #108 on: August 22, 2011, 06:05:18 PM »
The problem I would have in trying to do tests is I donít own a food mill.

Norma, if you ever what to try some recipe that requires processing tomatoes with a food mill, just use a large basket type screen strainer and a large rubber spatula instead of the food mill. Chop up the tomatoes into small pieces using a chef's knife and place them into the basket strainer over a large glass bowl. Use the spatula to mash the tomato pieces into the strainer until all you have remaining is the seeds and pulp that won't go through the screen. Discard the seeds & pulp. Do it in small batches, a cup or so at a time. . In fact, this method would yield a bit more liquid tomato than the food mill, but the food mill is just a lot less labor intensive.

---pete---

Offline norma427

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #109 on: August 22, 2011, 07:31:41 PM »
Norma, if you ever what to try some recipe that requires processing tomatoes with a food mill, just use a large basket type screen strainer and a large rubber spatula instead of the food mill. Chop up the tomatoes into small pieces using a chef's knife and place them into the basket strainer over a large glass bowl. Use the spatula to mash the tomato pieces into the strainer until all you have remaining is the seeds and pulp that won't go through the screen. Discard the seeds & pulp. Do it in small batches, a cup or so at a time. . In fact, this method would yield a bit more liquid tomato than the food mill, but the food mill is just a lot less labor intensive.

---pete---


Pete,

Thanks for the tip on trying a tomato recipe, without a food mill.  I can understand how you idea would work.  I do have some metal strainers.

Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #110 on: September 11, 2011, 09:25:57 AM »
I am not sure how many more times I will be able to make Lesís sauce this year, because my tomatoes that are ripening are getting smaller, and grasshoppers are also starting to eat chunks out of some of the tomatoes before they get ripe enough.  I have made Lesís sauce many times this summer, but guess it soon will be over for this year.  I was at Steveís home for some bakes in his WFO on Friday evening.  He still has many big San Marzano tomatoes on his plants.  Steve told me he is finished canning his San Marzanos  and is going to dig them under probably this coming week.  I asked Steve if he minded if I picked some of his San Marzanoís and took them home to make more Lesís sauce. He said I could pick all I wanted. I donít know why Steveís San Marzano tomatoes got bigger than mine, except Steve is a better gardener than I am and he pumps water from the creek to feed his tomatoes.  Well, it was off to making more Lesís sauce yesterday with Steveís San Marzano tomatoes and some of my smaller ones.  Lesís sauce did turn out well again, (with added Great Value crushed tomatoes) and now I have almost 3 more quarts to freeze for later use this fall and winter to use on pizzas or other foods I prepare.  I really love to eat the fresh slowed baked tomatoes right after they come out of the oven.  They are naturally sweet and have such a good taste, at least in my opinion.  

Edit:  I was working outside yesterday and found a praying mantis on my one tomato plant.  I think they are interesting insects.  If anyone is interested in knowing more about the praying mantis this is a link. http://www.theprayingmantis.org/

Norma
« Last Edit: September 12, 2011, 06:54:29 AM by norma427 »
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Offline norma427

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #111 on: September 11, 2011, 09:27:49 AM »
Norma
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Offline norma427

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Re: Tomato Sauce Tonight
« Reply #112 on: September 22, 2011, 08:33:47 AM »
I know most members must be getting sick and tired of reading my posts about making Lesís sauce, but I tried something different in the sauce yesterday, and Lesís sauce did have somewhat of a different flavor profile.  I used fennel seed this time, in addition to the salt, olive oil, fresh cut basil, garlic, and oregano in baking the tomatoes.  I also just used Walmartís Crushed Tomatoes to add after the baked tomatoes and other ingredients were mixed.  The flavor profile changed some when using the fennel seed, but not a lot.  I think I like the fennel seed added and tasted some right after Lesís sauce was finished, but I will reserve my comments until I can taste some of the Lesís sauce when it is defrosted from the freezer.

On another note, I think I will only have enough tomatoes from my garden to make Lesís sauce one more time this year.  I really donít like when fresh tomatoes from my garden are over, but hopefully Lesís sauces I made this year to freeze will last me over the winter.

Norma
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