Author Topic: Caputo flour freshness  (Read 1215 times)

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Offline Kermit

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Caputo flour freshness
« on: October 21, 2011, 04:17:39 AM »
I want to try the Caputo flour and have found that Forno Bravo sells it via it's UK shop. I can choose 5x 1 kg bags for about 10 pounds and 28 pounds shipping. If I buy a bag of 25 kg it's 25 pounds, and the shipping cost is the same. What is difference though is the price pr. kg.
7,6 pounds pr. kg vs. 2,12 pounds pr. kg. Quite a difference.

Now my question is how long the Caputo flour will be "fresh". My idea is to put it in some kind of container that seals it, but are we talking weeks, months, years before it will be useless?


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Caputo flour freshness
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2011, 07:40:36 AM »
If properly stored, it can easily last a year. I usually go through a 55lb bag in 6-8 months by making 2-8 pizzas per week and 1 or 2 large parties where 30 pies are served. By the end, I need to up the hydration due to the flour being much more dry than when the bag first opened, but I have not noticed a degradation in taste or quality of product. Others may disagree.

John

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Caputo flour freshness
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2011, 09:29:39 AM »
While some may say that flour can be stored for up to a full year at room temperature, unless you know how the flour was stored prior to your purchase (fat chance of that) you would be best advised to re-bag the flour into double plastic bags (like bread bags) and then store anything that you will not be using within the next month or so under refrigeration or in the freezer. Your main concern is insect infestation. You may not always see the black or reddish appearance of flour beetles (looks like pepper in the flour) as you can also have the larval stage present. This is when the flour is said to be "wormy". About the only way you'll be aware of this is if you sift the flour, then you will see the larva in the screen after sifting the flour. An old baker's trick is to freeze the flour for 45-days, this will kill all of the insect stages (from adult to eggs), then transfer the flour to a cooler where it can be stored for a much longer period of time if necessary. For the most part, flour is pretty free from insects as it comes from the mill, it is the post packaging contamination that gets it. The problem can/will occur in a warehouse, truck, or other transport, and all too often on a store shelf. And don't over look your own kitchen, I've had to discard buggy flour more than once from my own kitchen, especially when you store the flour in a drawer as I used to do. I now store it in a large glass jar.

Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Caputo flour freshness
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2011, 10:03:12 AM »
Tom,

Living in Texas where there can be long periods during the hot summer where one may not choose to make pizza, it is common to experience problems with bugs in the flour as it sits in a warm pantry. I have read that it is possible to sift out bugs and larvae and still be able to use the flour, assuming that one is not squeamish about doing that. Is there a point beyond which one would not want to do that, for example, if the eggs are in the larvae state?

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Caputo flour freshness
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2011, 09:33:21 AM »
Peter;
Sifting out the adult beetles and larvae might make you feel a little better about using the flour, but you have not sifted out the eggs, which will soon hatch and begin the cycle all over again. Your best bet is to break the bag of flour down into smaller bags and freeze them for at least 40-days. This will kill any beetles, larvae, and eggs. The flour can then be stored plastic or metal containers at room temperature for a much longer period of time.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor