Author Topic: Crisco Deep Dish  (Read 9632 times)

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Offline buzz

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Crisco Deep Dish
« on: July 10, 2005, 11:30:36 AM »
For all the Crisco fans out there--I found a recipe for yeasted biscuit dough with shortening. I didn't copy it, but it specifies 2 cups flour, 1 TBS. yeast, 2 TBS. cold butter, and 1 TBS. cold shortening. Obviously a very short knead, since it's a biscuit and the usual rise.

I wonder how this formula would work for a deep dish? Maybe 3 TBS. Crisco, or a combination of Crisco and oil? I'm tempted to try it, but I really don't like that Crisco-y taste that I get. Anybody else?


Offline burn8

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2005, 02:14:58 PM »
I enjoyed my last crisco dough so Ill give this one a go. Ive been wanting to try a dough with some butter in it anyway.

-Allan

Offline buzz

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2005, 09:47:03 AM »
Please post your results!

Offline burn8

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2005, 11:50:29 PM »
Ok. I used a bit of artistic license and changed the recipe a bit. Here is what I used:

16oz       KA AP flour
1.5 tsp    ADY
3 Tbsp    Crisco (zero trans-fat)
1.5 Tbsp butter
1.5 Tbsp salt
1.5 Tbsp sugar

The dough was flaky as expected and had a really nice flavor and consistency. Im not too good at detecting subtle flavors, but I did like the slight butter taste.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2005, 12:02:50 AM by burn8 »

Offline burn8

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2005, 11:52:31 PM »
As usual, I mix in a KitchenAid but only for about a minute and a half. The dough is quite scrappy when I pull it out.

Offline burn8

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2005, 11:54:28 PM »
It is pretty dry which makes it difficult to make it hold together... (forgive my terrible photography skills)

Offline burn8

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2005, 11:56:21 PM »
After 24hrs, it sheets out quite nicely with a rolling pin. I dont usually do the laminating thing since I try to emulate my local Chicago shop which I really enjoy.

Offline burn8

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2005, 11:59:01 PM »
I like to trim the edges (again to match my local favorite). I wouldnt mind finding a way to get my top layer of dough to stick better to the bottom layer around the rim of the pan. Obviously then, I must be creating a stuffed pie :)

Offline burn8

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2005, 12:01:14 AM »
And finally, a closeup of the finished product. I hope you can see how flaky this recipe turns out. I really enjoyed this crisco/butter recipe. Thanks for the idea buzz...


Offline buzz

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2005, 10:32:07 AM »
very cool--your finished result looks very Giordano's-like! Does it really turn out that yellow, or is it your camera? How much buttter would you say you tasted in the crust?

Offline burn8

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2005, 12:30:33 PM »
Any butter flavor is very subtle. As for color, I dont know why the first pictures are so yellow, but the two whiter ones are pretty representative of the real color. The color of the last closeup shot is the true color.

-Allan

Offline Steve

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #11 on: July 12, 2005, 12:52:18 PM »
I like to trim the edges (again to match my local favorite). I wouldnt mind finding a way to get my top layer of dough to stick better to the bottom layer around the rim of the pan. Obviously then, I must be creating a stuffed pie :)

Use a rolling pin to fuse the two layers of dough together (roll along the top edge of the pan).

Offline buzz

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2005, 01:06:11 PM »
I'm wondering about using frozen Crisco. Would that level of cold affect the yeast?

Offline burn8

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2005, 02:00:00 PM »
I think when added to a 70 degree ball of dough, the crisco would no stay frozen for long.

One thing you can do is freeze the crisco then add it during the 'laminating" process so you have it layered in with the dough. You can use a very fine cheese grater to make small slivers of frozen crisco to spread thinly over the dough before folding it. Im sure this would get you closer to a pastry type structure.

-Allan

Offline buzz

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2005, 09:36:25 AM »
I think the point of the solid fat is to coat it with the raw flour--this is what creates the ultimate flakiness in the baking stage. Well, I guess the only way is to try it!

Offline Perk

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2006, 11:09:06 AM »
Bumpin' the Crisco Chicago Pie.
Since I may just try this one soon.

-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.

Offline canadianbacon

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #16 on: February 07, 2006, 10:06:35 PM »
Hi Burn8,

I really have to compliment on your new pie there.  I also have to ask you how deep that dish it.
It's a very nice pan to make such a DEEP dish.  Any chance of you post ing a picture of it from the side ?
- I've never seen a dish that deep.

The pizza is really a thing of beauty, very uniform, and it just looks so dang good.... hell, can we say
damn good ? well there ya go, I said it...  :P

I love the colour to it, it really DOES look like a buttery kind of dough.  Makes me want to make one.

I need a pan like that also. geez.

Anyway great great job on that.  ;D
Pizzamaker, Rib Smoker, HomeBrewer, there's not enough time for a real job.


Offline lilbuddypizza

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2006, 08:39:34 AM »
It looks really good, but my problem with stuffed is that top layer of dough that doesn't cook properly because it is directly under the sauce. A lot of people think that it is actually cheese because of its consistency. When I make it at home, I put the sauce on only at the last 15 minutes. There a VERY few places that do likewise for their stuffed. Durbin's Pizza on Chicago's Southwest side cooks it fully before putting on the sauce.


Offline canadianbacon

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2006, 08:50:54 AM »
At first I kind of agreed with you, but then upon looking exactly where the point of your arrow is, I have to disagree.
That indeed looks like cheese.

I don't know much about Chicago deep dish, but I do believe that the cheese is put right on top of the dough.  Uncooked
dough doesn't melt like it is in that image ( exactly where the point of your arrow is )

I will agree that with a very very heavy thick pizza, you will maybe end up with uncooked portions of dough, but this can
be easily rectified by lowering the temp in the oven.

I really do believe your arrow is pointing to cheese, as I do see it melting there.

If you even look at the arrow head you have drawn, the 2 bottom tips of the actual arrow head are sitting on melted cheese.

Any dough that would not be cooked would be *below* that area .... that's melted cheese I'm sure.

I guess we can ask the original poster to send a link to a larger image so we can really do some CSI work
on this pizza mystery  ;D


It looks really good, but my problem with stuffed is that top layer of dough that doesn't cook properly because it is directly under the sauce. A lot of people think that it is actually cheese because of its consistency. When I make it at home, I put the sauce on only at the last 15 minutes. There a VERY few places that do likewise for their stuffed. Durbin's Pizza on Chicago's Southwest side cooks it fully before putting on the sauce.


« Last Edit: February 08, 2006, 08:53:05 AM by canadianbacon »
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Offline foodblogger

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #19 on: February 08, 2006, 08:56:10 AM »
The uncooked top crust on a stuffed pizza is not a difficult problem to overcome.  Look at commercial pizza ovens or a Neapolitan style pizza ovens.  They vary hugely on the diameter of the ovens but they all have 1 thing in common - a relatively low ceiling.  I think the home hearth kits are misguided.  They restrict the diameter of the oven but not the ceiling.  At home, I bake my pizzas with 1 stone on the bottom rack of the oven (2.5 inches above the floor of a gas oven) and an extra stone 3 racks above the first rack - 7.5 inches in my oven.  The results - in my hands perfectly baked pizzas including stuffed crust.  You wouldn't even have to use another pizza stone to compress your oven, you could use unglazed quarry tiles.

Offline lilbuddypizza

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2006, 02:13:07 PM »
CanadianBacon:
I can understand what you are saying. Maybe the arrow wasn't exact enough. I've attached another detailed pic with the area in question slightly darker. The tip of the arrows should be pointing at where I think the uncooked crust is.
Of course, as you've said, the original poster can clear this up, but I am convinced that I am right in theory.
1) In order to be a stuffed, it need either to be completely covered in a layer of dough/crust OR the filling/ingredients need to be covered with dough and then sauce on top of that.
2) The manner of ingredients that surround this layer make it impossible to be browned. No matter how long you cook it, the dough is surrounded by moisture, with nothing to draw it out. It has sauce on top, and the "stuffing" beneath. Therefore, this causes it to steam cook in a way. Cook a Pilsbury biscuit in the microwave, and you'll see what I mean. Believe me, I have searched for various solutions to my "dilemma" with the uncooked dough and short of placing a heated stone directly on top of the pan, there is no good way to overcome this without burning the top sauce. Or, like I said previously, make it at home and put the sauce on last.

Offline buzz

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #21 on: February 09, 2006, 02:21:12 PM »
Or don't use a top layer at all!

Offline canadianbacon

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #22 on: February 09, 2006, 03:03:55 PM »
Hi there lilbuddypizza  ;D

Well, I believe I owe you an apology,

I believe I totally misunderstood the nature of this pizza.

From what I'm now understanding, there are not one but **TWO ** ? doughs in that pie ?

I was only looking at the images, and did not see a second dough added in there, but after re-reading
that, it seems there are, in fact that is what the member made....

Can you or somebody explain what actually went into the pizza ? ... I only see one later of dough going into that
pan....

but from I now understand, there are 2.... the first layer, then the member added a second layer directly on top of that ?
( if so, why would this be ? ) - I don't understand the concept.

So in other words, the pan got a layer of dough - like you would do with a pie shell for an apple pie.
then another sheet of dough would be put over the original one ?

is that about it ?

anyway, and yes, you are totally right about the dough not being able to dry out if it has moisture on both sides
of it - very well explained by the way.

I will now listen for answers  :D

I'm brewing today by the way, ....a nice winter wheat.

you may see images here taken so far today

http://www.detroitgrillking.com/frosty/beerbrew/

I haven't finished my brew day yet, - right now I'm in the boiling stage of the brew.

Mark in Canada

Pizzamaker, Rib Smoker, HomeBrewer, there's not enough time for a real job.

Offline gottabedapan

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #23 on: February 09, 2006, 10:12:50 PM »
Canadianbacon,

A stuffed pizza consists of five (or six) layers. Building from the bottom up:

1) the bottom crust;

2) a layer of cheese (sliced);

3) toppings;

4) a second crust;

5) sauce.

Some people put a second layer of cheese between the second crust and the sauce.

The bottom crust is pulled up the sides of the pan and second crust is crimped to it.

Offline lilbuddypizza

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Re: Crisco Deep Dish
« Reply #24 on: February 10, 2006, 08:30:04 AM »
 ;D There's a thread on here somewhere about how the stuffed originated from something called (I think) Easter Pie.
If any Chicagoans will remember in the very early 70's , about 80-90% of the pizza joints that made stuffed(and there weren't many), made this type of stuffed pizza. It was totally enclosed. Most had no sauce on top at all. (I think S'Barro make one that LOOKS like this.)Some had just a THIN layer of sauce on top, that ended up as a "skin" on the crust. Then, around '74, Giordano's appeared on 63rd and California and eventually replaced this "Easter Pie" type with what we know today. Pizza Castle on West 55th Street makes a stuffed similar to the old type.
It's all good!!!!! :D


 

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