Author Topic: Autolyse  (Read 1400 times)

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Offline Coletrain

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Autolyse
« on: October 23, 2011, 11:05:48 AM »
I just recently started doing this and it seems that I'm getting more consistent results.  I'm basically making a similar version of the Dough Doctor's NY dough sometimes without oil.  Am I just imagining this?


Offline FeCheF

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Re: Autolyse
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2011, 12:14:29 PM »
Not at all.
I have been using a very slack dough recipe for awhile with acceptable results. I didnt mind because flavor was good, and always got nice air pockets in crust.
But recently i started modifying the recipe and getting much better results by autolyse and even better results by adding protein like vital wheat gluten. Now im able to sling the dough like the pro's.

Offline ThePieman

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Re: Autolyse
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2011, 02:02:04 AM »
Never had a lot of luck getting good gluten development via autolysis. It does a decent job, but at the end of the day, the dough which is mechanically kneaded for 15 minutes then allowed to rise in the cooler to a few days, always performs nicely. Whereas the dough I use a minimal knead, then allow it to undergo autolysis for 1 hour, then allowed to raise in the fridge for a few days, is apt to tear for me. I never have a problem with tearing using mechanical gluten development. To me, the flavor of the autolyzed dough isn't quite the same, either.   

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Autolyse
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2011, 06:04:41 AM »
Never had a lot of luck getting good gluten development via autolysis. It does a decent job, but at the end of the day, the dough which is mechanically kneaded for 15 minutes then allowed to rise in the cooler to a few days, always performs nicely. Whereas the dough I use a minimal knead, then allow it to undergo autolysis for 1 hour, then allowed to raise in the fridge for a few days, is apt to tear for me. I never have a problem with tearing using mechanical gluten development. To me, the flavor of the autolyzed dough isn't quite the same, either.  

An autolyse does not take the place of kneading or gluten development. Autolyse hydrates the dough and allows an enzyme called protease, present in the flour, to break down some of the gluten bonds. The result is better extensibility and better gluten development. The classic autolyse is done at the beginning of the workflow after combining the flour and water until just incorporated. You would then proceed with your mixing regimen, adding in salt and yeast. I usually only hold the salt, as the presence of yeast is not really a detriment to the autolyse process.

In the scenario you outlined, you took mixing almost entirely out of the equation, and then did a cold fermentation. That means you did not develop much gluten mechanically, and did not develop enough gluten chemically due to the cold storage. That would guarantee that your dough would be underdeveloped and tear.

John