Author Topic: New Pies with Full Strength Flour  (Read 4294 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline PizzaSean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 175
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #20 on: December 23, 2011, 02:34:12 PM »
Thanks so much! Getting a little closer each time...


Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 10627
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #21 on: December 23, 2011, 08:12:11 PM »
Sean, beautiful pies. I love the bacon and mushroom combo.

I usually cut my bacon crosswise into 3/8 - 1/2" strips and cook about 75% of the way. With a 4-5 min bake, you could probably cook the bacon 50% and have it come out of the oven just right.

CL
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline PizzaSean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 175
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #22 on: December 24, 2011, 03:08:24 PM »
Thanks for those tips, Craig! That sounds like the way to go regarding size and the 50% cook. 

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6339
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #23 on: December 24, 2011, 07:53:19 PM »
Sean, I can see how, like a grandparent who loves all their grandchildren 'equally', you could wax diplomatically about sometimes being in the mood for Lombardi's while other times being in the mood for this- at least, I could see you saying that after your previous bake.  But now that you've replicated perfection one more time... I would seriously hope that at least a tiny bit of that diplomacy might be going out the window.

This is the Chuck Norris of pizza. A Lombardi's pie would cower in this pizza's presence. A lot of people say "Oh, I like all pizza," and in theory, that's a beautiful sentiment.  Good on them, I say .  But the reality is that not every style of pizza is as good as the other- all pizza styles are not created equally- and this pizza here is the cornerstone for that paradigm.

Pick a non NY metro area town, anywhere in the U.S.- as long as there's a decent sized population and not a lot of pizza options available, this pizza will make you a millionaire in 7 years. With a Lombardi's clone, you'll be lucky if you can stay open for 7 years.

I know I'm never going to get you say "this pizza rules, Lombardi's sucks" but I would really hope that you can at least begin to grasp the inherent awesomeness that is this pie.  To the untrained eye, it really doesn't look all that different from the countless mediocre slice places you find on every corner in our area, so, for some, it could be easy to dismiss.  But, one bite, and you know.

The NY metro area may never see another golden age in pizza, but, if there's going to be any hope, it will be when people stop lauding Lombardi's (and Patsy's and Grimaldi's) and start celebrating this.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2011, 07:56:49 PM by scott123 »

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3263
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #24 on: December 24, 2011, 08:26:13 PM »


Pick a non NY metro area town, anywhere in the U.S.- as long as there's a decent sized population and not a lot of pizza options available, this pizza will make you a millionaire in 7 years.



Let's move all to Billings, MT where Domino's receives an almost 5 star review. And the population is decent at 147,972.  ;D

I'll call U-Haul first thing tomorrow morning. Anyone with me??
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6339
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #25 on: December 24, 2011, 08:30:55 PM »
But then you'd have to live in Billings, MT.








Just kidding! ;D

Seriously, though, Mike, just like Sean and I, you really can't open a place right where you are (a little too much saturation), but if you were willing to move, you, too, could have that million with the last handful of pies you've made.

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3263
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #26 on: December 24, 2011, 08:49:41 PM »
But then you'd have to live in Billings, MT.








Just kidding! ;D

Seriously, though, Mike, just like Sean and I, you really can't open a place right where you are (a little too much saturation), but if you were willing to move, you, too, could have that million with the last handful of pies you've made.

Scotty,

SF is not known as a Mecca for great NY-style pies. There is a severe lack of those shops here. I can probably count a handful of them who make decent NY-style pizzas, with the addition of two outstanding places.

The rest is just blah or is a hybrid of Artisan, Neapolitan, Californian and NY-style. In San Francisco, or where I live (Marin County just across the GGB), there's definitely a shortage.

But I don't want to hijack Sean's thread... :angel:
« Last Edit: December 25, 2011, 02:48:05 AM by Essen1 »
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline hammettjr

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 105
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #27 on: December 24, 2011, 09:50:22 PM »
I'd imagine if I had a means of vacuuming the bag shut when freezing it, I'd eliminate this problem.

Absolutely stunning Sean!

I've had success with frozen Grande as well. I wrap single pizza portions in plastic wrap, then put them in a ziploc bag. I just press the air out of the bag before fully closing it.

I'm looking forward to going back and reading some of your prior posts!

Matt



Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3263
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #28 on: December 25, 2011, 12:43:08 AM »
Sean,

This is what I use in case I need to freeze or vacuum-seal some food:

http://www.amazon.com/Ziploc-Vacuum-Starter-3-Quart-1-Pump/dp/B003UEMFUG

It works absolutely amazing for a fraction of the price of those electric vacuum food sealers. Especially when I go to Costco and buy a larger amount of fish, steaks, chicken or veggies. It works wonderful with cheese, too.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline PizzaSean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 175
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #29 on: December 25, 2011, 02:41:44 AM »
Thanks so much to all for the kind words! 

Anybody in this thread ever try NY Pizza Suprema?  I was thinking about starting a thread on it since searching it turned up almost nothing, yet I know it has quite a following.

One thing that I learned with these two pies I forgot to mention above is that watching the pie man at NYPS, I saw that when he did the hand stretch his hands were quite a bit farther apart from each other than the way I typically stretched.  So I made that adjustment on these two pies and found that they stretched very evenly - moreso than any other time in the past.  Anyway... I know a lot of the folks commenting here are quite well versed in the arts of stretching, but in case anyone honing that area of their pizza making is reading, thought I'd throw that in.

Thanks for the tips on the vacuum sealing! Very useful...

Now to address Scott's thoughts on my ol favorite Lombardi's vs. this style, I've always been very, very much a believer that there are just different classes of pizza:  you've got your classic slices, your lombardi's types (you know the places), your super thin/cracker/bar pie types (kinchley's, star, etc for jersey folk), and even your lower classes - the chains and frozen types.  And as a lover of pizza they all have a special place in my heart, even the worst quality ones at times do the trick. 

I think what has changed is that I was originally so stricken by the unusual nature of a Lombardi's/Totonno's etc and appreciated their tomatoeyness and the fresh basil combined with a great charred crust.  However, to me it's not "pizza" just like a Neopolitan is "original" but to me it's just not what a slice is all about. 

So perhaps we agree more than you realized or more than I made apparent/more than I realized myself. 

I can also say that this pizza is quite a bit more popular than the fresh mozz style is with my friends.  I don't think I'll ever leave the fresh mozz behind for good, but for the time being I certainly am much more fixated on the greatest slices in this tradition.


Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6339
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #30 on: December 25, 2011, 05:16:50 PM »
Scotty,

SF is not known as a Mecca for great NY-style pies. There is a severe lack of those shops here. I can probably count a handful of them who make decent NY-style pizzas, with the addition of two outstanding places.

The rest is just blah or is a hybrid of Artisan, Neapolitan, Californian and NY-style. In San Francisco, or where I live (Marin County just across the GGB), there's definitely a shortage.

But I don't want to hijack Sean's thread... :angel:

Mike, I'm not saying that your pizza can't run circles around your local pizzerias, it's just that if there's a lot of mediocre pizza to be had, sometimes misguided brand loyalty can make it difficult for the startup.  If you're putting out a superior product, you will prevail (Terry Deane opened a few doors down from a mediocre pizzeria and he succeeded), but I just can't give you my 7 year million dollar guarantee. Maybe 10 years  ;D

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6339
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #31 on: December 25, 2011, 05:24:29 PM »
Now to address Scott's thoughts on my ol favorite Lombardi's vs. this style, I've always been very, very much a believer that there are just different classes of pizza:  you've got your classic slices, your lombardi's types (you know the places), your super thin/cracker/bar pie types (kinchley's, star, etc for jersey folk), and even your lower classes - the chains and frozen types.  And as a lover of pizza they all have a special place in my heart, even the worst quality ones at times do the trick. 

I think what has changed is that I was originally so stricken by the unusual nature of a Lombardi's/Totonno's etc and appreciated their tomatoeyness and the fresh basil combined with a great charred crust.  However, to me it's not "pizza" just like a Neopolitan is "original" but to me it's just not what a slice is all about. 

So perhaps we agree more than you realized or more than I made apparent/more than I realized myself.

Sean, do you have any plans for a career in politics?  :-D

I'm just messing with you  ;D  I hear what you're saying.  I'd be very interested, after making these pizzas, to see how you feel on your next trip to Lombardi's or your next excursion into the fresh mozzarella world.

Btw, I don't think NYPS is using romano.  Romano has decidedly gamey/moldy notes that some Sicilian places (like L&B) use, but for NY, if they're going grated, my money's on parm- and not an expensive parm either.

Offline PizzaSean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 175
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #32 on: December 25, 2011, 09:35:09 PM »
Yeah the Romano was just what I had on hand... Looking forward to trying a parm next time!

Haha no politics please!


Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6339
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #33 on: December 25, 2011, 10:02:13 PM »
I think it goes without saying, but, even though NYPS might be using cheap parm, if you can, get your hands on the good stuff- either the grana padano or the parmigiano reggiano- no need, imo, for the stravecchio.

Offline PizzaSean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 175
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #34 on: December 25, 2011, 10:14:16 PM »
That actuall is vey useful to know since it is not something I have ever really purchased before ...
Thanks!

cornicione54

  • Guest
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #35 on: December 25, 2011, 10:22:50 PM »
re: use of Romano cheese
From the Pizza Suprema website:

Quote
Our Famous Signature Pizza Pies

Round Cheese Pizza (8 Slices) Our famous signature pie! Light thin crust topped with our famous house tomato sauce, the finest Grande Mozzarella and Romano cheeses. Slice-$3.00 Pie $20.00

Fresh Mozzarella With Basil Pizza Our very own house made fresh Mozzarella is used for this pie. The crust is topped with a plum tomato sauce made especially for this pie, the fresh Mozzarella is placed in between, sprinkled with a generous layer of imported Romano cheese, then topped off with a swirl of imported italian extra virgin olive oil and fresh basil. Slice-$3.75 Pie $25.00

White Pizza A cheese lover's favorite! Oozing with imported Romano and the finest Ricotta and Grande Mozzarella cheeses. no sauce Slice-$3.75 Pie $25.00

Sicilian Pizza (12 Slices) Good old " New York Style" sicilian a cooked onion based sauce, sprinkled with imported italian Romano cheese, covered with the finest Grande Mozzarella and all this on a light and airy deep dish square crust Slice-$3.00 Pie $25.00

Upside Down Pizza (12 Slices) A first cousin of the "New York Style" Sicilian this is the true sicilian pie and another famous signature pie. A sauce lover's favorite the finest Grande Mozzarella covers a light and airy deep dish square crust. The Mozzarella covered with a cooked onion based sauce, then finished with imported Romano cheese and extra virgin olive oil, sauce on top of the cheese, hence upside down pizza Slice-$3.00 Pie $25.00

Marinara Pizza (12 Slices) (8 Slices) A delicious garlic based marinara sauce, sprinkled with imported romano cheese and finished with fresh basil. no mozzarella Slice-$2.50 Pie $20.00

Grandma Pizza (12 Slices) (8 Slices) Thin crust Sicilian style Fresh Mozzarella, fresh tomato, fresh crushed garlic, imported Pecorino Romano cheese Slice-$3.75 Pie $27.00
« Last Edit: December 25, 2011, 10:24:34 PM by cornicione54 »

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6339
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #36 on: December 25, 2011, 10:31:01 PM »
I stand corrected.  Nice catch, Cornicione  :)

It looks like they're taking a page out of the L&B playbook.

FWIW, L&Bs grande+pecorino romano+san marzano combo is pretty darn magical. I've never really considered putting pecorino romano on a NY style slice, but now that I think about it, I might have to give it a try.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2011, 10:35:47 PM by scott123 »

Offline widespreadpizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1213
  • Location: NH
    • my beer store opening in june 2011
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #37 on: December 26, 2011, 12:28:05 AM »
Scott,  what?  Mozz and Romano= NY blend.  Grana does nice too,  parm dos not get me there usually. try some locatelli?  sp?  -marc

Offline PizzaSean

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 175
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #38 on: December 31, 2011, 01:25:38 PM »
Thanks for the heads up on Romano at NYPS, cornicione!

Below are a few quick shots from a bake the other day.  Took my soapstone and a block of grande, plus a few other essentials to my friend's place up in CT.  He was in for a quick visit and has been living in WI for a couple years and been starved for some NY pizza, so I did the best I could to help em out.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2011, 01:27:36 PM by PizzaSean »

Offline chickenparm

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1778
  • Location: Kentucky-Making New York Style Pies
  • Oh No,Not Pizza Again!!!
Re: New Pies with Full Strength Flour
« Reply #39 on: December 31, 2011, 02:35:50 PM »
Looks Perfect!Wish I could eat a few slices of that!
 8)

-Bill


 

pizzapan