Author Topic: Max time dough on paddle  (Read 827 times)

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Offline Dan Mozell

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Max time dough on paddle
« on: November 14, 2011, 07:44:33 AM »
Can anyone tell me how long I can leave my stretched out dough on the paddle before adding the toppings and cooking? I ask because I'm figuring out the logistics of making a bunch of pizzas for a party. In the past I've never made more than two pies at a time and there's no significant wait. Will an hour on the paddle mess up the dough? Thanks.


buceriasdon

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Re: Max time dough on paddle
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2011, 08:23:39 AM »
Not a work flow I would recommend. Dough sticking on the peel is not a good thing. Opening and topping skins shouldn't take all that long if you are prepared. When I have company for pizza they understand when it's time to make pizza they can get their own glass of wine or a beer. Plenty of time for entertaining after the work is done.
Don

Can anyone tell me how long I can leave my stretched out dough on the paddle before adding the toppings and cooking? I ask because I'm figuring out the logistics of making a bunch of pizzas for a party. In the past I've never made more than two pies at a time and there's no significant wait. Will an hour on the paddle mess up the dough? Thanks.

Offline Lespaul20

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Re: Max time dough on paddle
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2011, 08:35:57 PM »
I'd be more concerned with oven availability. 

Offline Glutenboy

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Re: Max time dough on paddle
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2011, 10:34:31 PM »
Prestretching skins and leaving them on a peel doesn't sound like a promising technique to me.  Once you get good at the stretch, it doesn't take long, and the seconds saved would be paid for in dried out dough, stuck-to-the-peel dough, or even possibly both.  Your best bet for timesaving imo is if there's a double oven, have them both going so you can stretch, dress, and start another pizza in oven number 2 while the pie in oven number 1 is cooking.
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Max time dough on paddle
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2011, 08:20:13 AM »
Dan Mozell,

Since you posted on the NY style board, I assume that you are talking about a dough and skin for that type of pizza. If so, if you are making a straight NY style dough with a hydration above about 63% and are not using any stretch and folds, you have to pay attention to the possibility of the skin sticking to the peel and not let the skin sit on the peel for long. Many professionals who specialize in the NY style use a hydration for that style of around 57-58%. That alone will reduce the likelihood of the skin sticking to the peel. If in your case you are using a hydration that is higher than normal for the NY style, for example, above 65%, you might find it helpful to use parchment paper on the peel rather than run the risk of losing the pizza altogether because of a sticking problem or a misshap loading the pizza into the oven.

Peter

Offline Dan Mozell

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Re: Max time dough on paddle
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2011, 10:05:21 AM »
Dan Mozell,

Since you posted on the NY style board, I assume that you are talking about a dough and skin for that type of pizza. If so, if you are making a straight NY style dough with a hydration above about 63% and are not using any stretch and folds, you have to pay attention to the possibility of the skin sticking to the peel and not let the skin sit on the peel for long. Many professionals who specialize in the NY style use a hydration for that style of around 57-58%. That alone will reduce the likelihood of the skin sticking to the peel. If in your case you are using a hydration that is higher than normal for the NY style, for example, above 65%, you might find it helpful to use parchment paper on the peel rather than run the risk of losing the pizza altogether because of a sticking problem or a misshap loading the pizza into the oven.

Peter
I'm currently using 60% hydration. So if I shaped my pie and left it on parchment for an hour, would that affect the outcome?

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Max time dough on paddle
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2011, 10:39:42 AM »
I'm currently using 60% hydration. So if I shaped my pie and left it on parchment for an hour, would that affect the outcome?

Dan Mozell,

If you are talking about only a skin and not a fully dressed pizza, at 60% hydration I don't see a problem because you can always lift the skin off of the peel and make any needed adjustments to the release agent (e.g., flour, cornmeal, etc.) used on the peel. I don't think that I would want to leave a fully dressed pizza on the peel for an hour, especially a large size pizza, because it is possible for the sauce, especially a watery sauce in direct contact with the skin, to migrate through the skin and cause the skin to stick to the peel. At that point, it would become difficult to correct the sticking problem. What most professionals do to plan ahead for peak periods is to form the skins in advance and put them on seasoned pizza screens or disks (so that they don't stick) and, in some cases, put them in the cooler (refrigerator) and then remove them as needed to meet orders (after a suitable warmup time). It is also possible to stack pre-made skins separated by wax paper or parchment paper. But if you use pizza screens, you don't want to leave the skins on them for too long at room temperature because they can end us seeping into the crevices of the screens as the dough warms up and starts to proof and become permanently attached to the screens. Most pre-made skins will hold for a couple or hours or so at normal room temperature but you have to be sure that they are not allowed to stick to whatever you put them on.

Peter


 

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