Author Topic: Finally some NP pies  (Read 16905 times)

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #40 on: February 01, 2012, 09:51:52 AM »
All those pies are all drop dead gorgeous Marlon. I really like the filetti.

What are the toppings on the top left and right pies?

CL
Pizza is not bread.


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #41 on: February 01, 2012, 10:12:36 AM »
Bravo Marlon. One of the first times I have seen someone on the forum attempt 3 pies at once. Do you think that in your hurried state you were a little hard on the dough? I have noticed that even the best of doughs get a little tough when they are handled roughly.

John

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #42 on: February 01, 2012, 10:55:51 AM »
Thank you Craig and John!  Looking back, I was definitely not as gentle with the dough during the stretch and slap.  It was more of a pull and tug.  :-D   It was quite fun though taking 3 pies out of the oven for the guests to eat immediately.  I can certainly understand how a pizzeria can come up with inconsistent pies especially during peak times. 

The pie on the top left was an Amatriciana with tomato, guanciale, red onion, and chili flakes.  The one on the right was a test Korean pie with ssamjang (hot soybean paste) mixed 50/50 with my tomato sauce, marinated pork belly (Korean-style), green onion, and finished with radish kimchi.  These were leftovers from the grill last Monday and I thought it would be fun to try and we loved it.  It needs some tweaking so I will do it again. I won't add the tomato sauce into the base.  I will just thin out the ssamjang with a little bit of water instead to get its pure flavor in the pie. 

Marlon

Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #43 on: February 02, 2012, 11:42:23 AM »
Marlon if I had to use one word to describe your pizzas... the word "rustic" comes to mind... and I mean it in the most complimentary way!

One question though... the last batch didn't seem to have as much leoparding as some of your previous batches?  True or is it just the pics?  If so... what do you attribute it to?  shortened bulk fermentation? 

Thanks

Scot

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #44 on: February 02, 2012, 03:56:33 PM »
Scot, thank you for the compliment! 

I think the leoparding spots were much smaller compared to my previous pies and I noticed that the cornicione were more brown than usual.  I would usually see the area around the leoparding to be lighter in color (more white) but this last bake was a bit darker.  I was trying to go for the smaller leoparding spots with a more even browning around it (see link below for pic) and not the extreme contrast of black spots with a light-colored cornicione. 

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=3087.0

I figured a shorter bulk rise and using the dough a bit early than usual might do the trick together with a much hotter oven.  I think I had some success although I would probably get a better idea if I bake them next time without rushing too much trying to bake 3 pies at once and pay more attention to each pie. 

Marlon

Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #45 on: February 02, 2012, 06:57:08 PM »
Thats funny you mention that.  

A couple of weeks ago I made some pies that were bulk fermented for about 24 hours and balled for 4.  They cooked up fairly nice.  Five days go by and I noticed that I had a couple of dough balls hanging around in the wine fridge ( about 60 degrees).  I just cooked some chicken in the WFO so I decided to throw one in for giggles.  It was an overblown mess but I managed to get it off the peel OK.  What I noticed was the most extreme "black on white" leoparding I have ever done.  I decided to sprinkle a little parm on it and give it a try.  If I'm being honest, the crust really wasn't all that good... kind of "bready".  But the spots were striking at least.   :-\

Scot
« Last Edit: February 02, 2012, 07:32:13 PM by pizza dr »

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #46 on: February 02, 2012, 08:25:44 PM »
Scot, that pie looks exactly what I was describing.  It reminds me of the cornicione of Paulie Gee's pies.  I love the extreme contrast with the blisters and the cornicione but, with my last bake, I was going for something different. 

So, the extremely long fermentation is the key to that look.  Do you think the cold fermentation contributed to that effect as well?  Would you say that the dough was already past its prime when you baked it?  If it was, the overfermentation possibly contributed to the "bready" texture. 

Thanks.

Marlon




Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #47 on: February 02, 2012, 08:41:45 PM »
Love that leoparded look Scott.  You should post more of your pies.   ;)  Scott, you didn't at anytime reball these did you?  They had the same 4 hour ball as the others but then back into the fridge for another 5 days?

Chau
« Last Edit: February 02, 2012, 09:14:11 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #48 on: February 02, 2012, 09:11:04 PM »
Marlon

The dough was definitely over-fermented ( at least by what I'm used to working with).  It almost looked like one of my starters that had just been fed except with larger bubbles instead of the tiny ones I'm used to seeing with my starter.    I must also mention that I did not let it come to room temp before I formed the skin.  I had a lot of bench flour ( necessary for me to even work with it) and was pretty rough  with it ( I wasn't planning on serving it to anyone).   I think the handling of the dough more than anything was the reason for the bready nature of it.  I think if I allowed the dough to come up to room temp and handled it with care I could have had something better as far as the crust goes. 

Scot


Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #49 on: February 02, 2012, 09:13:21 PM »
Thanks Chau

I didn't want to embarrass myself.  But I"m getting a little more consistent. 

Scot


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #50 on: February 02, 2012, 09:15:39 PM »
Your're too modest.  Let's see the goods!  :-D  Sorry I just edited my previous post to include a new question for you.

Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #51 on: February 02, 2012, 10:04:05 PM »
Chau

Thats correct.  They had the same 4 hours of room temp warm up and straight back into the 60 degree wine fridge.  I guess I should have put them into the regular fridge and I probably would have been OK.

Scot

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #52 on: February 03, 2012, 01:48:35 AM »
I agree with Chau, Scot.  You should post your work more often. 

Marlon


Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #53 on: February 10, 2012, 05:30:46 AM »
Some pies baked tonight:

100% San Felice flour
62% HD
2.5% culture
2.8% salt

22 hrs bulk at 65F, 10 hrs balled at 70F.  70 sec bake @ 825F. 

I made 12 dough balls just to practice without any topping except tomatoes but I could not help myself.   ;D  Interestingly, 4 of the 12 dough balls were made with Bleached AP flour since I did not want to waste my SF flour for practice.  It was a 66% HD dough with everything else the same as the SF flour.  The dough handled beautifully and it was quite hard to tell the difference if I didn't know it was AP flour. 

Some pics:

Marlon



Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #54 on: February 10, 2012, 05:35:45 AM »
Btw, the last crumb shot is from the AP flour dough.


Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #55 on: February 13, 2012, 02:50:11 AM »
Some pies baked tonight:

Dear Marlon, beautiful and colorful pizzas, thank you! Please, what kind of oven did you bake the pizzas in? Good night!

Regards,
Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #56 on: February 13, 2012, 03:31:11 AM »
Thank you Omid!  I baked these pies in my homemade brick oven. 

Marlon

Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #57 on: February 17, 2012, 12:30:15 AM »
Marlon

Those are beautiful.  I still don't know how you do the multi-pie shot though.  I think when your baby girl is around 14, those pies will be consumed right out of the oven (like my house it is survival of the fittest)  >:D

What kind of starter do you use and can you give me a little more detail on your workflow please?  Thanks!

Scot

Offline bakeshack

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #58 on: February 17, 2012, 03:09:10 AM »
Scot, thank you!  I can't wait for her to start walking already.  ;D  My 4-yr old son loves to eat the pie right out of the oven "al libretto".  It's amazing! 

My starter is also Ischia and I maintain it at room temp @ 60% HD.  My usual workflow is a long bulk fermentation at RT (60-65F) and a shorter balled rise (65-70F).  I mix the starter and water, then add 3/4 of the flour.  I mix the dough in my KA mixer at low speed and add the remaining flour a little at a time.  During the 2-3 min mark, I add the salt.  My total mix time is around 8 mins, no more than that.  I let the dough rest for at least 20 mins.  I will usually perform 1 full turn of stretch & fold before I put the dough away for bulk fermentation (24 hrs).  I find that the S&F gives the dough just enough strength before starting the bulk fermentation.  It also ensures that the dough will be smooth and somewhat tight. 

After the 24 hrs, I start balling the dough for the 6-hr final rise.  I find that this is the earliest that I can use the dough balls without any issues.  They can go up to another 8-10 hrs at room temp. 

Lately, I've been trying to work on eliminating the extra large bubbles in my dough which usually burns during the high heat bake.  Tonight, I reversed my workflow and did a 2-hr bulk and 30-hr balled method.  I was going for the less raised rim with a much more even leoparding which I commonly see with pizzerias in Naples like Da Michele and Gino Sorbillo.  These pies were baked for 80 secs at 860F floor.  I was going for a much shorter bake but I didn't manage the fire properly so the top needed some help, which lengthened my bake time.  I think I got some success with the absence of burnt bubbles and a much more even leoparding and color around the cornicione.  These pies were still very tender and light just like my other pies using the other method despite the longer bake time.  Maybe another 4 hrs in the balled rise would be perfect.  Oh well, till next time . . .   :)

Here are some pics.  I apologize for the poor quality. 

Marlon






Offline pizza dr

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Re: Finally some NP pies
« Reply #59 on: February 17, 2012, 11:34:03 AM »
Awesome!!!!

Do you maintain your starter at RT always?  If so,  that is a PITA. 

Thanks for the details.   :chef:

Scot


 

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