Author Topic: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust  (Read 24979 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2006, 09:56:33 AM »
chiguy,

I'm sorry. I misunderstood the point you were making in your earlier post. I was looking at hydration in an absolute sense, not in relation to what someone like Ledo's would do in a commercial environment. As best I can tell, most cracker-type dough recipes that are intended for commercial applications call for above 40% hydration--more in the range of 43-45%, or thereabouts.

Peter


Offline Lydia

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2006, 03:50:44 PM »
I am wondering if the dough was alowed to set covered at room temp before pressing into a ball, if the dough has enough hydration to become cohesive without pressing?
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2006, 07:08:27 AM »
Lydia. DKM's thin crust recipe is one of the simplest recipes on this site but oddly enough it is one that requires the most attention to detail.  To answer your question, I press the dough into a ball straight from the mixer squeezing it tight.  As it ages on the counter, as it really doesn't rise much, it tends to crack apart, but not to worry as a good squeeze just before rolling puts things in order.

Offline Lydia

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #23 on: March 23, 2006, 03:58:31 PM »
My thoughts are leaning towards the manufacturing process for crackers, of both the baking soda and sourdough varieties. Steam is used to slightly hydrate the dough enough to sheet. I'm trying to think of a way to replicate that process with this dough.

Sounds crazy...but maybe my clothes steamer would work. Maybe rice steamer. I-dunno.

Just thoughts at this point.

There needs to be a mad-scientist icon for moments like this.  :D
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Lydia

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2006, 04:11:10 PM »
I guess I'm needing to replicate a poof-box that impliments steam. My oven's lowest setting is 175F which is too high (aiming for about 100F) and misting the oven tends to dry-out the outer skin, which of course I wouldn't want unless I was baking it.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #25 on: March 27, 2006, 10:37:58 AM »
Made DKM's famous cracker thin crust last night and as always it is out standing.

On the side I used Wally Worlds Great Value crush tomatoes in Puree.  Altough they are are not as good as 6-in-1, I will not hesitate to use them again.

Randy

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #26 on: May 09, 2006, 03:05:48 PM »
Here is the final version for the stand mixer using the paddle attachment.  I went back to Olive Oil.  This is one great pizza.  For tomatoes for the thin crust I now use Wally Worlds Great Value crush tomatoes with Penzeys pizza seasoning

Based on DKM’s thin crust recipe
Monday, May 08, 2006


1 pound Unbleached Bread flour
2 teaspoon raw or Turbinado sugar or regular sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon Classico Olive oil
5.9 oz. warm(90F) water by weight  With a pinch of sugar
1 ˝  teaspoons instant yeast or active yeast

Place flour, sugar and salt in the mixing bowl then run the mixer on stir speed using the paddle attachment.  Weigh the warm 90F water and add a pinch of sugar and yeast then stir to dissolve. Set aside.

With the mixer still running add the oil. Let the mixer continue to run for 5 minutes while the yeast mixture blooms.  After 5 minutes and with the mixer still running slowly add the yeast mixture.  Let mixer run for 3 more minutes after adding yeast mixture.  Stop mixer.  This dough will look strange and very dry.  Remove from bowl and squeeze together to make a ball.  Cover the mixer bowl tightly with Saran wrap and leave on counter top overnight but 24 hours is better.  I make mine in the late afternoon for supper the next night.

Roll out dough(not easy) to about 20" in diameter which should get it around 1/16” thick.  Place on 16" pizza pan then use the roller to cut off excess dough.  Use a fork or docker to prick holes randomly on the bottom of the pan but not the sides.  Before putting the toppings on, place the crust in a 475F oven on the bottom rack for 5 minutes.  Remove and add toppings.  Place back in the oven on the bottom shelf.  Bake for 8 minutes then check but it will probably take 10 minutes.  Remove when cheese just barely starts to brown.  If you want, turn the pizza around at the 5-minute mark for even browning.

Offline Lydia

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #27 on: May 09, 2006, 04:40:15 PM »
Hey Randy,

the last pic you posted is looking alot like Round Table's deep dish- Thin crust with a lip. Have your tried RT and would you say that it is similar?

I've had my mom's 6qt. KA and really dont think it would have worked to well for this recipe. I got a KA for Mother's Day that is a 5 qt. with a much narrower bowl, so I'm more willing to give this recipe a try.

I've also had some experiences recently with how doughs will absorb moisture as they ripen. The concept is still a bit hazy to yet. So am feel a bit more comfortable with your recipe

I was trying to make hamburger buns (starts off dry and then transforms into a nearly wet dough). The recipe incorporates oil in the kneading processes instead of using flour. Well, I didn't get burger buns, I literally got delicate croissants.


What bread flour are you using, I'd like to use something comparable.

And do you rest at all during the rolling of the dough?

Do you forsee any reason why I couldn't put the dry dough in plastic wrap; then twisting it tightly to form it into a tight ball and letting it ripen that way?
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #28 on: May 21, 2006, 03:46:56 PM »
Lydia, I just found this question today.
No, I have never had the opportunity to try RT pizza, so no help there.
I use a 5 qt mixer, Like you I am not sure the wide bowl 6 qt would works as good as the 5 qt without increasing the size of the recipe.
No doubt the dough picks up moisture overnight.
Let me know if you find a good hamburger bub recipe.
I use KA bread flour
Yes I do let the dough rest when rolling it out.
Placing the dough in plastic would be interesting.

Hope this response is not too late.
Randy

Offline Lydia

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #29 on: May 23, 2006, 03:28:47 PM »
Thanks Randy

I just returned my 5qt, and am getting the Pro600. I think I might be ok making this recipe in the larger bowl the ...hopefully  :-\ I'll double the recipe if I need to.

Regarding Hamburger buns. I found this recipe I'm itching to try, it looks fantastic! but it's in German   :-\ and Steve (fiance) can't translate all of it. I was thinking about asking the forum for help, I think we have a few guys in Germany.

I haven't found KA bread flour in my area... yet, so I'll have to use Pendleton's Special Pizza Blend. It has done well with other drier pizza crust recipes, so I don't anticipate any problems using it. If I remember right the protein level is close to KA bread flour. But I'll look for the KA bread flour again this weekend.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.


Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #30 on: May 26, 2006, 02:15:06 PM »
Lydia, I saw your comments on the donuts and thought they were interesting.  Recently I have tried my pizza dough recipe and it makes a great but very chewy donut since it uses high gluten flour. 

Offline Lydia

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #31 on: May 27, 2006, 04:17:09 PM »
Yah, I could see this would make some chewy doughnuts, not a popular texture in American doughnuts. I think this recipe has potential to make great bagels or flat bread.

How was the oil absorption for the doughnuts? and what did you fry them in? oil? shortening?
How thick did you roll or form the dough?

 I "finally" scored some KA bread flour. So now I'm just waiting for my new KA kitchenaid to be delivered.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Jack

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #32 on: May 28, 2006, 01:44:12 AM »
I think this recipe has potential to make great bagels or flat bread.

I've maded bagels from extra pizza dough.  It works well.

Jack

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #33 on: May 28, 2006, 06:17:14 AM »
Lydia, I use peanut oil for frying.  I might have have miss  lead you in my poorly worded post on the donuts, the recipe I used to make donuts was my American style, which make very light but very chewy donuts.  The donuts turned out very sweet and had minimum oil infusion since they fry so quick.  This thin DKM based crust would make some brick like donuts. LOL

Randy

Offline Lydia

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #34 on: May 28, 2006, 01:26:32 PM »
LOL :-D OK, now I can imagine a better doughnut.  :)

I have heard soo many wonderful things about frying with peanut oil, but not had much luck. It seems like the ones I have purchsed have been stored improperly, because they taste rancid.

What brand did you use?
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #35 on: May 29, 2006, 05:52:20 PM »
Lou Ann peanut oil from WalMart or just about any place.  Are you using a fryer with the element in the oil for rapid temperature recovery?

Offline Lydia

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #36 on: May 29, 2006, 06:37:54 PM »
When I tried the peanut oil, it was on a gas range and I adjust the temperature manually. I've been deep frying from a young age so I have good sense for adjusting my oil temperatures. It has been quite a few years since I've tried, and I'm assuming that good brands just were available to me. I've sen the Lou Ann during the Thanksgiving season, but I'll check walmart in a few weeks.

My deep fryer sucks, it dosen't get as hot as is says it does. It's great for blanching larger batches of potatoes for the freezer and that is about it. I really don't believe it is reaching over 300F when frying small batches. I miss the old GE deep fryer we had when I was in elementary school, it was the best. I still have the light scars from bumping my forearm on the outside of the thing.

I seriously want to get a good fryer. I only have 1 "power burner" on my gas range, so I'm limited on what and how much I can cook at one time. What brand has an element with rapid recovery? I thought they didn't exist in home appliances, something to do with "safety" to reduce likelyhood of grease fires.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Randy

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #37 on: June 01, 2006, 05:21:08 PM »
Here is one of many on the market.  I have used this one but the rating are goood i think.  Notice the element is sitting in the oil.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00009K3V1/?tag=pizzamaking-20

I have a delonghi and it is good but I will buy a differant brand next time.  Just avoid the fry daddy type.

Offline enchant

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #38 on: June 03, 2006, 11:53:21 AM »
There's a popular pizza joint nearby that makes a pizza with a cracker crust.  It's a popular place and their pizza has a distinctive flavor.  My brother went diving through their dumpsters and we think we know what they use to make the pizza, but I do know that they only put the pizza in the oven once.  They don't take the dough out halfway through and dress it.

Why might that be?  Are they using a hotter oven, or perhaps a completely different dough recipe?
--pat--

Offline Lydia

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Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #39 on: June 24, 2006, 07:09:50 PM »
Finally got to make this pizza. The whole process was indeed intriguing. It's similar to pie pastry.
I hit two little bumps that has made me call for a "do-over".

I'm happy to report that the formula as written it worked just fine in the 6qt. bowl. As I expected the mixed dough was scrapy vs. the corn-meal like texture in picture posted made with shortening.

I did use extra-wide reynolds wrap sprayed with PAM to gather the scrapes. The extra-wide plastic was "just" large enough to encompass the mass. I felt that I got very good even compression as I twisted the pastic tighter and used my other hand to compress the dough ball. The ball has a look like it might fall apart, but I could tell by the feel that it wasn't going to.

At room temp it grew a bit faster than I expected and had to loosen the pastic a couple of times to allow for expansion.

My first little "bump" was that an airpocket between the plastic and dough developed and dried out the dough in that area.

The dough rolled out a whole lot easier than I anticipated and I was able to give it a bit of a stretch too.

I did the par-bake and decided I wanted to finish on the rack, since the dough showed it was sturdy enough and didn't appear to stick to the pan.

Then hit my second "bump" as I was transfering the dough onto the rack.

I met "a pinch" of resistence, so I gave it a nudge and.... "just a pinch" of dough stuck to the pan and tore a tiny whole clear through, which of couse was bad news for toppings and the oven floor.

I know there a whole list of thing I could have done, but I had a few other pies (different style) to get into the oven yet. So, I chose to underbake so I didn't get the crisp.

Dispite all that, my Family loved the intense flavor of this dough. I think everyone commented. Mom kept insisting that I added Beer!

The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.