Author Topic: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust  (Read 25073 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Lydia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 833
  • Location: NORTHERN ALABAMA
    • Viddler
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #40 on: June 29, 2006, 05:35:11 PM »
Randy?

Would you consider using a 50/50 Crisco/oil emulsion in this formula ?
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.


Offline Randy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2020
  • Age: 67
  • Pizza, a great Lycopene source
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #41 on: June 30, 2006, 06:13:49 PM »
Lydia a good guestion.  I never tried a mixture but it should work fine.  I used Crisco on this recipe for some time before switching to Classico olive oil.  Use the Crisco zero trans fat in the green can.

Offline Lydia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 833
  • Location: NORTHERN ALABAMA
    • Viddler
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #42 on: June 30, 2006, 06:21:12 PM »
I understand the health benefits of the green label, but is there a significant perforance difference between original and the green label?

The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Randy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2020
  • Age: 67
  • Pizza, a great Lycopene source
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #43 on: June 30, 2006, 06:50:57 PM »
I use it my piecrust with butter and you can not tell the difference.  Well worth changing to the green can Lydia.

Offline Lydia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 833
  • Location: NORTHERN ALABAMA
    • Viddler
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #44 on: November 15, 2006, 02:24:50 PM »
I just recently came across this in a forum. THought it might be interesting to note. I'm assuming that this person worked at Pizza Hut in the "good 'ole days" when Pizza Hut was more like the "original California Style" pizza.

Quote
I worked at pizza hut. The dough SHOULD BE too dry to ball up. It needs to sit in a closed plastic bag for 4 hours (good for 8 hours) @ room temp before pressing and rolling it.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline OahuAmateurChef

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2007, 03:55:51 PM »
Thanks for the recipe Randy. I just made a batch of dough based on your May 9, 2006 posted recipe. The texture looks exactly as I have read about. I'll see how it tastes tomorrow or tonight.

Offline katef

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 18
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #46 on: March 10, 2007, 12:28:32 AM »
Thanks for posting your recipe, it was great.  I have just a few questions.

I followed the recipe perfectly, but the crust still wasn't as crackery as I would hope.  I rolled out the dough to a 20in circle, but it still seemed a little thick, and I didn't get as many of the air bubbles in the bottom of the crust as I expected.  Maybe the dough wasn't as thin as it needed to be and I'll work on getting thinner next time.

Also, I was confused about whether or not I should grease the pizza pan.

This is a great recipe, it made me so happy to get this close to making my idea of a perfect cracker crust.

Thanks!

Offline fazzari

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 901
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #47 on: October 28, 2007, 11:50:32 AM »
Just had excellent results making a cracker type pizza at home.  I made a 40% hydrated dough and mixed until there just crumbs left in the bowl.  I then hand squeezed to make a ball and let set at room temp for 28 hours.  I then rolled it out as thin as possible (this was tough), folded it on itself and rolled it again (this was tougher).  I then cut two 7 inch pizzas out of the sheet and refrigerated them for another day.  Baked them at 500 right on the stone...they were fabulous
John

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22008
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #48 on: October 28, 2007, 02:11:28 PM »
John,

What kind (model) KitchenAid mixer did you use at home, and with what kind of hook?

Peter

Offline fazzari

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 901
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #49 on: October 29, 2007, 02:23:39 AM »
Peter
I have a small K5SS and used the J shaped flat dough hook that came with the machine.  I have to tell you though, the mixer had very little to do with this dough.  I knew the mixer in no way could develop such a dry dough, so I used it just to gather all the ingredients together, and let it work til it started to whine...then I stopped and just pulled it together by hand.  I let it set out for 28 hours to use the biochemical gluten development method...twice during this period, I stretched out the dough and folded it to aid in gluten development.  A month ago, I would never have thought this could work...but it does!
John


Offline fazzari

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 901
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #50 on: October 31, 2007, 02:42:07 PM »
Tried another experiment using the kitchenaid to make a cracker crust at home.  Increased hydration to 45%...the mixer handled the dough well, at least until the dough balled up.  Let the ball sit out 14 hours at room temperature....then sheeted the dough using a rolling pin to one eightth inch thick, folded in thirds and rolled again to one eightth inch thick...I then cut out my skins using round templates.  Refrigerated dough ovenight.  This is an interesting method because you first get to sheet the dough when it is very manageable...and the day after it is refrigerated, you can roll it again if you like it even thinner.  The pizza was beautiful and tasted fabulous, in fact I ate two.   The 45% dough seems to be just right for using a rolling pin with minimal effort compared to the 37% and 40% dough.
John

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22008
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #51 on: November 01, 2007, 03:05:03 PM »
John,

Your experience with a medium-hydration dough for a cracker-style pizza mirrors mine. I last made a medium-hydration cracker style dough with a hydration of 45% and it rolled out beautifully and easily. I have also discovered that subjecting the dough to a long period of room-temperature fermentation before rolling it out makes the dough easier to roll out. From what you said in an earlier post, that seems to be true of a cold fermented dough also. I also found that rolling out a dough after just a couple hours of room temperature fermentation is much, much harder to do. It is also prone to shrinking.

Peter

Offline DarkFlame

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #52 on: February 04, 2008, 11:06:12 PM »
Having just made my first attempt at DKM's "Pizza Inn Thin & Krispy" style pizza crust, I thought I'd look & see where would be the best place to post my results.  Seeing that I used our KitchenAid stand mixer (with the dough hook), I thought this would be appropriate.  Sorry, no pics.  Didn't think about that until I was reading this thread after-the-fact.

I was off work yesterday & today (a rarity to have 2 consecutive days off), so I figured I'd make the dough yesterday & then the pizzas for dinner tonight.  I followed DKM's recipe but strayed a few times from the exact recipe - a couple of times on purpose and at least once unintentionally.

Yeast typically works ok with water between 90 & 110 degrees (Fahrenheit).  Our water heater is set to 120, so I poured the water into a 32 ounce cup & let it sit (with a thermometer in it) & then used that to make three recipes after it cooled down.  The first one was at 110 degrees & the third one was at 90 degrees.  There was no discernable difference in the result, tho that may have been because of at least one of my other variations from the recipe.

I used 3/4 cup of water, as the recipe states.  But, I used 1/2 cup in the mixer with the oil (canola because of it's cholesterol lowering properties - unlike olive oil which is still bad but not as bad as many other fats) and 1/4 cup with the yeast in it to dissolve (not proofing the yeast because we're not feeding it - sugar - simply dissolving it in the water).  That was a 66%/33% split instead of the 75%/25%.  I can't see how this variation would make a discernable difference in the finished product.

I put the dry ingredients (all-purpose flour because that's what the recipe called for & I used it for that reason - we don't keep high gluton bread flower on hand unless I'm working on a new bread recipe) - flour, sugar, & salt - into the mixer slowly with the water/oil mixture.  When I had about 1/3 of the dry stuff mixed in, I added in the water/yeast mixture & then added the remaining dry ingredients.  I cranked the hook up to 4 (a good speed, faster than the recommended "stir") and walked away from it for at least 10 minutes.  In fact, I stepped into the back bedroom we call our "office" & clicked off a couple of emails.  I don't know how long I was away, but when I returned, it was pretty much as well mixed as it was going to get and was in the powdery/crumby consistency that's been stated.

I put the "dough" (if you could call this semi-moist/semi-dry mixture a "dough") into a RubberMaid container & covered it with Press-&-Seal Glad Wrap.  I repeated this process two more times, using a total of three containers.  I had figured that each recipe was good for one single pizza, which I figured was about a 12" pizza.  I was making one for my wife & one for myself and three tiny ones for our three children, so I figured I needed three recipes.  I could have done it all with one.

Here's where the unintentional variation kicks in.  I took all 3 containers & put them into the fridge, figuring I'd take them out after we took Emily to gymnastics, and that would give them about 2 hours to come to room temp before I'd roll them out.  They were in almost the exact same condition (albeit colder) when I took the containers out of the fridge as when I put them in.  So, I filled the sink with hot water & dropped the containers into it, figuring I'd warm up the dough & make it a bit more pliable (easier to roll out).  This seemed to work a bit & it even rose a little bit, but the flavor was ... well, there just wasn't any flavor to the finished crust.  I probably should have let the thing sit at room temp the whole time, and that's something that I'll be doing the next time I make the recipe.

So, I rolled out the three pizzas for the children & had used less than half of one recipe, with plenty of scraps left over.  The remainder of that recipe was used on April's 12" 'za, and I opened the 2nd container to use half of it for my own 'za.  Like I said, there were plenty of trimmings left over.  Had I been a bit more conservative in pulling dough for each 'za, I could have made all 5 pizzas with just one recipe.

Rolling the dough out was a pleasure, if not a bit of exercise.  But, a little flour on the countertop went a long way, & the dough never stuck to anything.  Being that I've made a bunch of thicker crust pizzas at home (that always stuck to everything), this was a pleasure to roll out, even if it was more exercise.  I got the thickness somewhere close to 1/8", so this was a LOT of dough.  Had I gotten it to 1/16th", like the recipe states, I could have covered my entire kitchen in pizza crust!

The blank was set on parchment paper that was in a sheet pan (1/2" lip, like a jelly-roll pan).  Our oven doesn't cook as evenly as we'd like, so we had to turn each pan about half-way thru the cooking time to prevent one side from burning.

The crust was not a cracker crumb, but it was (thankfully) very edible.  Considering that I've made some recipes that turned out prompting us to eat left-overs instead, this one was very good.  The bottom would have been crispier had we taken it off the parchment & onto a rack to cool for a few minutes before slicing it, but April doesn't like the really crispy bottoms because they tend to cut her mouth.

One problem that we encountered was using a fork to dock the blank instead of using a normal pizza docker.  Our results lacked the patterned consistency of a docker, so the dough was a little thicker in some places & a little thinner.

Next time, I'll make just one recipe & let it sit for 24 hours on the counter top instead of inside one of the fridges.  Hopefully, this will improve the flavor of the crust.

We also made the sauce (from the other Pizza Hut Thin & Crispy recipe) & I was less impressed with that.  It wasn't thick enough, even tho I triple drained the tomatoes and then drained it again after I ran it all thru the blender.  I didn't want to add tomato paste, so it had a bit too much loose liquid in it.  And, the flavor was not as prominant as I wanted it.  I like to be able to taste the crust and the sauce & the cheese under all the toppings.  I've got some experimenting to do with the sauce.

But, I was not unhappy with the crust results, and have a pretty good idea about what to do differently next time.  I just wish I could find a good sheeter for home use!

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22008
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #53 on: February 05, 2008, 06:45:49 AM »
DarkFlame,

I and other members have done a lot of experimenting with the DKM recipe over the past couple of months and have some thoughts to offer that might help you.

First, you might want to follow the DKM recipe exactly some time, just to establish a baseline for the DKM style of cracker crust. In my case, I eventually made changes to the recipe, including using IDY instead of ADY (mainly for convenience of use) and increasing the amount of salt (for flavor enhancement), but I found that it helped to understand the recipe as originally presented and to identify possible areas for improvement. Also, many members have found that recipe quite satisfactory without making any changes.

Second, if you plan to continue to use ADY, you may want to read this recent post on the rehydration of ADY: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6162.msg53187/topicseen.html#msg53187 (Reply 3). See also http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6163.msg52957.html#msg52957 (Reply 3)

Third, you may want to take a look at this thread on the DKM recipe and modifications that I and other members made to it: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.msg48991.html#msg48991. In particular, you may want to read Reply 16 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.msg49138.html#msg49138, in which I described a dough warming method for warming up the dough to make it easier and quicker to roll out using an ordinary rolling pin. In my case, I used a proofing box but I recently used a method similar to yours (see Reply 126 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5762.msg53174.html#msg53174) in which I submerged a container of dough in fairly warm water. If you use that method, I would suggest using water of around 130-135 degrees F and allow the container to remain in the water for about an hour and a half. There are many other tips in the same thread, including using a KitchenAid stand mixer, and even tips for making the dough entirely by hand. I also described a convenient method of pre-preparing the dough skins in advance and putting them into the refrigerator rather than preparing the dough skins after either a room temperature fermentation or after cold fermentation (although the dough warming method will work at the back end of the process as well as the front end). The preparation of the skins in advance has worked very well for me and at the same time the skins receive a fair amount of fermentation time to develop the flavors of fermentation.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 05, 2008, 07:38:14 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Randy

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2020
  • Age: 67
  • Pizza, a great Lycopene source
Re: KitchenAid Mixer thin crust
« Reply #54 on: February 05, 2008, 07:57:17 AM »
I agree with Peter on this one, give DKM's recipe a try exactly as it was written first.  So many others have deviated from his recipe then questioned the results.  Once you try his really good recipe as is then go to the links Peter noted.  One of the interesting criteria of his recipe is the on the counter rise.

Certainly feel free to post your own thoughts and experiments then everyone will be talking about DarkFlame's pizza recipe. 8)