Author Topic: Pizza Hut Priazzo?  (Read 58563 times)

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Offline HungryFreak

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Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« on: July 14, 2005, 10:20:10 AM »
Greetings, I just discovered this site and I plan on trying a recipe or two this weekend. I have always been frustrated that, although I could make some pretty good pizzas, I could never make one that tastes anything like what you get at the restaurants. I am glad to see some of the recipes here address that and can't wait to try them

Anyway, back in the late 1980's - early 90's, Pizza Hut had a pizza called the "Priazzo." It was a multi-layer pizza with crust, cheese, crust, sauce, cheese. I liked the "Priazzo Napoli," which adds tomato slices on the top layer. I don't believe they were cooked in a pan. The pizza, was BY FAR, my all time favorite commercial pizza. They had a distinctive flavor that is absent from any other Pizza Hut pizza then or since.

If anyone remembers these, and has any idea on how to reproduce them (everything, the crust, the cheese blend, the sauce), I would greatly appreciate it.



Offline Ronzo

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2005, 01:05:53 PM »
I vaguely recall this pie.

I don't remember the specifics though. Sorry. :(
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Offline jam4ar

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2005, 05:21:53 PM »
Hello, I'm new here.... But I thought I'd share my knowledge..

The pizza you describe sounds much like one that pizza hut released around 01/02 called the insider.  Thin Crust, 6 blend cheese, Thin crust, sauce, cheese, toppings, cheese.

If I recall correctly... the 6 blend was moz, cheddar, parm, provolone, monterey jack, and Romano.

I remember the one you cite too.. but I don't know what was in it..

that's about all I got..

Offline huskerknox

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2005, 12:15:52 PM »
Priazzo Milano was my personal favorite.  I have always held out hope that Pizza Hut would bring the Priazzos back.  I agree -- my all-time favorite pizza.  I'll keep hoping, I guess!

Offline thewood87

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2005, 08:45:38 PM »
I used to work at Pizza Hut when the Priazzo was still in service. Basically we took our thin crust dough and put it through the rollers and put that in a deep dish pizza pan. Then we put down pizza sauce, toppings and cheese. Next we rolled another thin crust and put this on top and pinched the two crusts together. Another slathering of sauce and a lot of cheese on top of this. The only other thing that we did was push a pin grid into the center of the pie to help get heat into the center to cook the toppings in between. This thing was my favorite pizza. They should bring it back.

The insider is way to thin. The priazzo was more like a Lou Manattis sp? with another crust on top with sauce and cheese on top of that.

Shane

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2005, 09:02:54 PM »
Shane,

Can you describe what the pin grid is and how it works? Thanks.

Peter

Offline thewood87

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2005, 09:17:41 PM »
I will try! Basically it was a bunch of cast iron spikes about 1" apart and 2" deep in a spiral pattern held together by a metal frame. It was about 10" in diameter. I have been looking for something to use for this so I could try to duplicate that pie. I cooked a few priazzo's back in the day without the grid and the center would hardly be warm. If anyone has any suggestions on how to transfer the heat to the center I would greatly appreciate it.
Shane
« Last Edit: December 15, 2005, 09:20:14 PM by thewood87 »

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2005, 09:31:26 PM »
Shane,

Is this what you are talking about: http://www.amnow.com/pizzaSupplies/heatSinks.html? If so, Tom Lehmann, a pizza guru at the American Institute of Baking, isn't too crazy about using these devices. He suggests a longer bake at a lower oven temperature. Of course, with a Priazzo-type pizza that may not work.

Peter

Offline thewood87

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2005, 09:38:47 PM »
Exactly! Wow are those things expensive.  :o I think that I will have to go with the longer baking time and lower temperatures. Thanks for the link, Pete, it has all of the cool stuff.
Shane


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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2005, 09:56:35 PM »
Shane,

Apparently the heat sinks are used mostly for deep-dish and stuffed pizzas. So, it makes sense for the Priazzo. As you will note from this link they come in different sizes: http://www.twinsupply.com/proddetail.asp?prod=HS444. Even the small heat sinks are expensive, although not as bad as the larger ones.

IMO, American Metalcraft (AM) is a very good, broad-based supplier of pizza items of all kinds. Almost all restaurant supply companies carry some product from AM.

If you try to make the Priazzo-type pizza maybe you can tell or show us the results you get. All the better if someone can come up with an inexpensive device that replicates the AM heat sinks.

Peter

Offline scott r

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2005, 12:31:22 AM »
YES!!!!! the priazzo is was the best commercial pizza I have ever eaten.  I loved it and was so sad when it dissipeared.  I was always amazed at how much better those pies tasted than the other offerings from the Hut.  Forgive me if it is covered elsewhere, but what was the cheese blend they used?
I would love to try to duplicate this pizza at home.


Does anyone have a thin crust recipe that is similar to the Pizza Hut thin crust ? I assume there is something here on the fourm that is similar, and I would love to know which one.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2005, 12:37:08 AM by scott r »

Offline HungryFreak

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2005, 09:01:46 AM »
I used to work at Pizza Hut when the Priazzo was still in service. Basically we took our thin crust dough and put it through the rollers and put that in a deep dish pizza pan. Then we put down pizza sauce, toppings and cheese. Next we rolled another thin crust and put this on top and pinched the two crusts together. Another slathering of sauce and a lot of cheese on top of this. The only other thing that we did was push a pin grid into the center of the pie to help get heat into the center to cook the toppings in between. This thing was my favorite pizza. They should bring it back.

The insider is way to thin. The priazzo was more like a Lou Manattis sp? with another crust on top with sauce and cheese on top of that.

Shane

Thanks for the info. From what I remember though, at least with the Priazzo Napoli, there was not any sauce in the middle, only cheese (unless it was a very small amount).

Do you have any suggestions for dough recipe, sauce recipe, and percentages for the different cheeses?


Offline TRex

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2005, 10:46:10 AM »
Hello,
 I found this site while searching for a recipe for a Priazzo crust recipe. I managed Pizza Huts during the rollout of Priazzo. Priazzo's dough was unique to Priazzo (at the time the dry ingredients except flour were prepackaged). The dough contained cornmeal, more oil, and the consistency was more like pie crust than pizza crust when cooked. It was run through the dough roller at a slightly thicker setting than Thin and Crispy.(A real operational pain in the butt ::)) The sauce and cheese blend were also unique to Priazzo. I believe the cheese blend was made of four cheeses. The largest percentage was Mozzarella and there was cheddar also. I cannot remember the other two. The cheese blend was prepackaged by Pizza Hut but there are several italian cheese blends that would probably work. The sauce had much less water than the other sauces much like lasagne sauce. In fact I believe the sauce, as long as the consistency is right, is not as important as the crust. The thermal spiders were developed for use in the conveyor ovens where the cook time was fixed. Longer cook times eliminate their need. Preheating the filling would help speed up the cook time and prevent the top from becoming too done. The cook pans were developed especially for Priazzo and had angled sides like pie pans and were thick aluminum. 

I too believe Priazzo was Pizza Huts best product except for maybe the original Thin and Crispy Supreme. (The crust has to be right though). The trick to Priazzo is the crust which unfortunately we didn't make from individual ingredients. The secret's in the bag. ;)  Maybe this will help some talented doughmeister  clone it.  Please share it if you do. 

Offline scott r

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #13 on: December 18, 2005, 11:39:57 AM »
T Rex, this information will help us a lot!  Thank you

Offline groovy89

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2005, 04:27:11 PM »
My husband and I both worked at Pizza Hut once upon a time and were there when Priazzo was offered and would both would love for it to come back.  Anyway, my suggestion would be to warm up the sauce ahead of time.  The warm sauce will help melt the cheese.  To keep the top crust from getting too done, cover it with foil for most of the cooking time and then remove it during the last 10-15 minutes of baking so the crust will brown (just keep an eye on it).  It works with regular pie crust so it should work with this also.  I am going to try making one tonight.  I also am going to try and brush melted garlic spread on the top crust and sprinkle some parmesan cheese for a tasty topping.  This will help it bake more evenly and turn more golden brown.

Offline thewood87

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2005, 09:58:49 PM »

TRex,
I think you are right on the Thin and Crispy supreme. When I worked at the Hut we would always have a Scooby snack at the end of the night. It was a large Thin and Crispy Supreme. No Green Peppers, add Jalapenos. No Pork add extra beef and of course extra three cheese blend. Cook a little extra and Bam! I put on 25 lbs. in the year that I worked there in college.
Shane

Offline Perk

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2006, 01:08:17 PM »
I got to bump this thread up! Since I asked about it in another post.
I couldn't remember the name,
It is the ONLY pizza I liked from pizza hut after they changed the dough recipe about 20yrs back.

Pizza Hut should bring back this pizza but we all know they are in business to not serve good stuff.
Why on earth would they stop making this pizza? Also Why did they change their dough way back when? Aprox 20 yrs ago. Yea The dough is way different for what it originally was.

Urr!


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Jacksonville Fl.


Offline Hi Gluten

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2006, 02:11:37 PM »
No offense to any fans of PH, but this was the only thing they ever made that I would eat. I don't remember the names, but I liked the meat  priazzo and the multi-cheese one (quattro fromagio?). It was kind of spin off a Chicago deep dish. Obviously not the same thing as "The Real Deal".

All chains are in the business to make money. Which is ok. Others are artists and follow their muse. Many, if not most fall somewhere in between and balance their artistic desires with commercial needs.


I miss it too!  :(

Offline leslauber

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2006, 04:54:08 PM »
It was a couple of years after priazzo was discontinued that I found two heat sinks and a couple of the priazzo pans at a flea market for a couple of bucks each. I picked them up, then checked with some friends who had been PH employees and confirmed that these were, indeed, the very tools PH used. Apparently some local store surplused the material out to someone who eventually sold/gave it to the flea market.

Offline bhize

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #19 on: August 25, 2006, 04:55:07 PM »
When I started at PH and they were still making Priazzos at the time.   The pans were a little over an inch deep, and they had a cutter pan edge, not a rolled edge.  They had changed how they made them when I started.  The way that they were made towards the end, was a layer of thin dough, sauce, toppings, cheese, another layer of thin dough, sauce and cheese.  I don't remember if we used the three blend cheese, or moz, but think it wa the three blend (moz, monterey jack, cheddar).  The pin was optional, but did make it cook better.  The cooks hated cleaning the pins, and we think they were hidden in the trash and thrown out, because towards the end, we only had a few left...  I have a medium pan and pin, and had a chance to have all of them that the store had, but at the time I said no, and the rest all went into the dumpster.  :( I wish I could go back and take all of them!  They work great for Chicago style pizza.

They didn't even call them the Milano, etc any more, but the Meat Lover's, etc, which supposedly is where the Lover's line got it's start.

Offline BroccoliRob

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2006, 12:25:31 PM »
I found an old Priazzo commercial, on YouTube of course. Nice!  :chef:


Offline Klankster

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2007, 03:38:39 PM »
I apologize for bumping an old topic like this, but has anyone made any progress on duplicating the Priazzo since the last post on this?  I was a big fan of the Priazzo Milano, and was really disappointed when they dropped this product.  I think I'd take a shot at duplicating the thing if I can get one of the heat sink gizmos mentioned.  My biggest question is whether or not the two crusts are made from the same recipe.
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Offline slackshanger

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2007, 02:38:45 AM »
   I am new at this site but here is the recipe I use. I have included the type of Priazzo lists ingredients for finding your favorites. It is 2:20 am in the morning here but I have just typed my personal recipes for it.

   FYI: There is an intermediate layer of dough in the Priazzo Torte.

   It is also important to note that layering is strictly important. Separating the cheese layers with meat before adding the wet ingredients (i.e. peppers, mushrooms, or what have you) will improve texture. Try to use fresh vegetables too. It prevents hydration of dry ingredients that can occur. For added flavor try fire roasting any vegetable that will be used. Also an improvement to the sauce is to make a big batch and let it cook for six hrs or more. GOOD SAUCE TAKES TIME.

   I prefer the 6 Cheese Medium blend on average.

   I also do a Greek style Priazzo (which I call Chariot) that has Feta, Gyro meat, tabouli (finely chopped parsley, mint, tomato, scallion, lemon juice, black pepper, cinnamon, and allspice), spinach, onion, and olives. It uses a green tomatoes, tzatziki and olive oil sauce. It is very enjoyable.

   I use the heatsink you will want to experiment with the technique without one. Maybe try pre-baking the vegetables and meat and then layering them while still warm, adding the cold cheese in-between the layers.
   
   I tried adding 2 different links to where I bought the equipment but got this message:
Sorry, Guests and New Members are not allowed to post messages containing hyperlinks.

   Anyway let me know how you enjoy it. :D

Priazzo
Types of Priazzo

Priazzo (classic 2-decker - 1 inner layer of fillings)
Priazzo Torte (3-5 decker - 3 inner layers of fillings)

Deutsche (sliced knockwurst and sauerkraut)
Roma (pepperoni, beef, pork, onions, mushrooms, Italian sausage)
Milano (pepperoni, beef, pork, Italian sausage, bacon bits)
Verona (sliced meatballs, onions, green peppers)
Florentine (five cheeses, regular cheddar, mozzarella, ricotta, Romano, and parmesan - combined with ham and spinach)
Napoli (four cheeses: mozzarella, cheddar, Romano, and parmesan - topped off with a layer of freshly sliced tomatoes)
Portofino (Italian sausage links, onions, green peppers)
Chariot (Gyro meat, tabouli, olives, spinach, onion, mushroom)

Various Cheese Blends

Classic 3-Blend (Mozzarella, Regular Cheddar, Monterrey Jack)
Mild 3-Blend (Mozzarella, American, Loraine Swiss)
Medium 6-Blend (Mozzarella, Monterey Jack, Cheddar, Provolone, Parmesan, Romano)
Sharp 4-Blend (Sharp Cheddar, Edam, Romano, Parmesan)

Priazzo Equipment for Priazzo:

2 Chefs Planet #598 Deep Dish Pizza Pan 2 Piece Set - Rustica (traditional Italian) Pan w/ Trimming Lid

2 AmNow #HS-999 Baking Heat sinks 40 pins 9" (22.9 cm) Point to Point. For 14" - 16" pizzas

Pizza Sauce for Priazzo

4 (6 oz) cans tomato paste
1/2 cup Italian Chianti or any other red wine heated to 100 degrees
1/2 cup water
4 Tblsp grated Parmesan cheese
2 tsp minced garlic
1 Tblsp honey
1 Tblsp anchovy paste (optional)
1 Tblsp onion powder
2 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp dried marjoram
1/2 tsp dried basil
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper
1/8 tsp red pepper flakes
Salt to taste

Mix all ingredients and let sit at least 30 minutes and up to 1 day before using, stirring occasionally, and refrigerated if allowed to sit more than 1 hour. Makes enough sauce for two 12"-14" Priazzo

Italian Herb Mix for Priazzo Crust

2 tsp Dried Oregano
1 tsp Dried Basil
1 tsp Dried Rosemary
1 tsp Dried Thyme
1 tsp Dried Sage
2 tsp Dried Parsley or Cilantro

Store mixture in air-tight container until used

Cheese Mix for Priazzo

3 3/4 cups shredded Mozzarella
1 cup shredded Monterey Jack
3/4 cup shredded Cheddar
1 cup shredded Provolone
3/4 cup tablespoons grated Parmesan
3/4 cup grated Romano

Store mixture in air-tight container until used
 

Priazzo Crust

2 pkt Dry yeast
1 2/3 cups Warm water
2 tsp Sugar
2 1/2 cups Cold water
3 Tblsp Corn oil
2 Tblsp Sugar
1/3 tsp Garlic salt
1 1/2 tsp Salt
1/4 cup Dry Italian Herb Mix
6 1/2 cup All-purpose flour
2 cups Corn Meal

Soak corn meal in separate bowl 20 minutes in 1 cup of warm water prior to use.
Soak Italian Herb Mix in 1/8 cup of water prior to use
Sprinkle yeast over warm water and stir in the sugar. Let stand about 5 minutes or until very bubbly.

Combine the remaining ingredients with about half of the flour, beating to a smooth batter.

Combine yeast mixture, cornmeal mixture and the Italian Herb mixture.
 
Beat in the yeast mixture. Then with a sturdy spoon work in remaining flour until you can toss it lightly on a floured surface and knead it until it feels elastic in texture.

The kneading may require about 3/4 cup additional flour, which you will be coating your hand with as you knead the dough. Don't let the dough become too stiff.

Place it in a large plastic food bag or bowl. Be sure to spray inside with a cooking spray or wipe the inside of it with oil and place the ball of kneaded dough to rise until doubled in bulk. Be sure the plastic bag or bowl is large enough that it will permit the dough to double. You can place the bag or bowl of dough on a warm, sunny spot on the table or kitchen counter which helps it to rise.

When dough has doubled, punch it down and shape it. Form the dough into a ball about six to eight inches wide.
Using both hands, one on top of the other, press from the center outwards on it to start stretching it out, turning the dough a bit on each push. You can also pick up the dough and squeeze the edges of it while turning it like a steering wheel. This allows the weight of the dough to stretch it.

Once the dough is about 1/2" thick all the way around, use a rolling pin to flatten it out to about 1/4" thick. Run the pin over once or twice, flip the dough over and give it a quarter turn and roll it again to make it even. Roll it till there is approximately 1/4 inch over lapping the pizza pan edge

Take a fork and put puncture holes all over the dough. This keeps it from bubbling up while cooking. Transfer dough to the Deep Dish Pizza Pan that has been greased and dusted in cornmeal. Press over the bottom and up the sides of the pan.

In a frying pan, brown any meat and vegetables you will be using in the Priazzo.

Start stacking the ingredients starting with a layer of meat, sauce, then vegetable, then cheese, then meat, etc. Midway you can add a thin layer of crust half the size of the outside crust, being sure to coat it lightly with oil to limit moisture absorption. Proceed to continue the layering process until you reach the top of the pie. Cover each pie with dough that has also been punctured all over with a fork; crimp edges to seal.

Add the sauce and topping ingredients, spreading each ingredient evenly over the dough. Let this rise about 20 minutes in a warm place and then bake at 375, about 45 to 60 minutes, putting one Priazzo at a time on center rack of the preheated oven.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2007, 03:54:37 AM by slackshanger »

Offline Klankster

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #23 on: November 10, 2007, 12:24:03 PM »
Wow, thanks for the detailed response!  I'll report back when I've made the attempt at this.  I need to definitely get one of the heatsinks first.  It's a big investment but I think it'll be worth it.
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Offline WOP

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #24 on: March 15, 2008, 01:18:45 AM »
Not sure what others are talking about who claim they worked there and saw their advice was totally wrong.  I worked as a cook and assist manager for four years. 
1. The crust was the thin crust, no other crust.  We didnt recalibrate the thinness either.  The top part of the dough roller thins it to about quart of an inch and second roller thins it down to propper thinness.  Although you may have to roll this through a couple times to do so.
2. Sauce was the same.  Pizza hut has 2 types of sauce. Pizza sauce and breadstick sauce.  Breadstick sauce is also used for cavatini, spagetti.
3.Yes you will need heat sinc to properly cook your medium or large priazzo pizzas, but if you find a good heavy thin pan thats a small, you wont need to use them.  I made one for my employee meal almost every day i worked there and smalls never needed one, and always cooked through.  Just dont go crazy on the pizza sauce and wet ingridients...onions peppers mushrooms, they all contain water and will saturate your pizza without cooking out...unless you have a commercial oven capable of evenly cooking at 545 degrees.  Also if you do cook one, dont be opening the oven door to check on it, lose all the heat and you will need it.  It took 7 minutes for ours to cook one at work.
 4.  Perforation is key to making thin crust not bubble.  Simply poke holes with fork all over the surface of dough after its on pan.  At work they had a roller with spikes on it.  For second layer of dough you will have to do this on counter first.

Note...I have found making them at home very hard mostly due to how hard it is to replicate thin crust with no dough mixer. Thin crust is made with very little water and gains most of its moisture after the plastic sack is tied shut and is proofing.  I use a small stone pan for mine and works great in that regard.