Author Topic: Pizza Hut Priazzo?  (Read 54463 times)

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Offline BroccoliRob

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2006, 12:25:31 PM »
I found an old Priazzo commercial, on YouTube of course. Nice!  :chef:



Offline Klankster

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2007, 03:38:39 PM »
I apologize for bumping an old topic like this, but has anyone made any progress on duplicating the Priazzo since the last post on this?  I was a big fan of the Priazzo Milano, and was really disappointed when they dropped this product.  I think I'd take a shot at duplicating the thing if I can get one of the heat sink gizmos mentioned.  My biggest question is whether or not the two crusts are made from the same recipe.
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Offline slackshanger

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2007, 02:38:45 AM »
   I am new at this site but here is the recipe I use. I have included the type of Priazzo lists ingredients for finding your favorites. It is 2:20 am in the morning here but I have just typed my personal recipes for it.

   FYI: There is an intermediate layer of dough in the Priazzo Torte.

   It is also important to note that layering is strictly important. Separating the cheese layers with meat before adding the wet ingredients (i.e. peppers, mushrooms, or what have you) will improve texture. Try to use fresh vegetables too. It prevents hydration of dry ingredients that can occur. For added flavor try fire roasting any vegetable that will be used. Also an improvement to the sauce is to make a big batch and let it cook for six hrs or more. GOOD SAUCE TAKES TIME.

   I prefer the 6 Cheese Medium blend on average.

   I also do a Greek style Priazzo (which I call Chariot) that has Feta, Gyro meat, tabouli (finely chopped parsley, mint, tomato, scallion, lemon juice, black pepper, cinnamon, and allspice), spinach, onion, and olives. It uses a green tomatoes, tzatziki and olive oil sauce. It is very enjoyable.

   I use the heatsink you will want to experiment with the technique without one. Maybe try pre-baking the vegetables and meat and then layering them while still warm, adding the cold cheese in-between the layers.
   
   I tried adding 2 different links to where I bought the equipment but got this message:
Sorry, Guests and New Members are not allowed to post messages containing hyperlinks.

   Anyway let me know how you enjoy it. :D

Priazzo
Types of Priazzo

Priazzo (classic 2-decker - 1 inner layer of fillings)
Priazzo Torte (3-5 decker - 3 inner layers of fillings)

Deutsche (sliced knockwurst and sauerkraut)
Roma (pepperoni, beef, pork, onions, mushrooms, Italian sausage)
Milano (pepperoni, beef, pork, Italian sausage, bacon bits)
Verona (sliced meatballs, onions, green peppers)
Florentine (five cheeses, regular cheddar, mozzarella, ricotta, Romano, and parmesan - combined with ham and spinach)
Napoli (four cheeses: mozzarella, cheddar, Romano, and parmesan - topped off with a layer of freshly sliced tomatoes)
Portofino (Italian sausage links, onions, green peppers)
Chariot (Gyro meat, tabouli, olives, spinach, onion, mushroom)

Various Cheese Blends

Classic 3-Blend (Mozzarella, Regular Cheddar, Monterrey Jack)
Mild 3-Blend (Mozzarella, American, Loraine Swiss)
Medium 6-Blend (Mozzarella, Monterey Jack, Cheddar, Provolone, Parmesan, Romano)
Sharp 4-Blend (Sharp Cheddar, Edam, Romano, Parmesan)

Priazzo Equipment for Priazzo:

2 Chefs Planet #598 Deep Dish Pizza Pan 2 Piece Set - Rustica (traditional Italian) Pan w/ Trimming Lid

2 AmNow #HS-999 Baking Heat sinks 40 pins 9" (22.9 cm) Point to Point. For 14" - 16" pizzas

Pizza Sauce for Priazzo

4 (6 oz) cans tomato paste
1/2 cup Italian Chianti or any other red wine heated to 100 degrees
1/2 cup water
4 Tblsp grated Parmesan cheese
2 tsp minced garlic
1 Tblsp honey
1 Tblsp anchovy paste (optional)
1 Tblsp onion powder
2 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp dried marjoram
1/2 tsp dried basil
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1/8 tsp cayenne pepper
1/8 tsp red pepper flakes
Salt to taste

Mix all ingredients and let sit at least 30 minutes and up to 1 day before using, stirring occasionally, and refrigerated if allowed to sit more than 1 hour. Makes enough sauce for two 12"-14" Priazzo

Italian Herb Mix for Priazzo Crust

2 tsp Dried Oregano
1 tsp Dried Basil
1 tsp Dried Rosemary
1 tsp Dried Thyme
1 tsp Dried Sage
2 tsp Dried Parsley or Cilantro

Store mixture in air-tight container until used

Cheese Mix for Priazzo

3 3/4 cups shredded Mozzarella
1 cup shredded Monterey Jack
3/4 cup shredded Cheddar
1 cup shredded Provolone
3/4 cup tablespoons grated Parmesan
3/4 cup grated Romano

Store mixture in air-tight container until used
 

Priazzo Crust

2 pkt Dry yeast
1 2/3 cups Warm water
2 tsp Sugar
2 1/2 cups Cold water
3 Tblsp Corn oil
2 Tblsp Sugar
1/3 tsp Garlic salt
1 1/2 tsp Salt
1/4 cup Dry Italian Herb Mix
6 1/2 cup All-purpose flour
2 cups Corn Meal

Soak corn meal in separate bowl 20 minutes in 1 cup of warm water prior to use.
Soak Italian Herb Mix in 1/8 cup of water prior to use
Sprinkle yeast over warm water and stir in the sugar. Let stand about 5 minutes or until very bubbly.

Combine the remaining ingredients with about half of the flour, beating to a smooth batter.

Combine yeast mixture, cornmeal mixture and the Italian Herb mixture.
 
Beat in the yeast mixture. Then with a sturdy spoon work in remaining flour until you can toss it lightly on a floured surface and knead it until it feels elastic in texture.

The kneading may require about 3/4 cup additional flour, which you will be coating your hand with as you knead the dough. Don't let the dough become too stiff.

Place it in a large plastic food bag or bowl. Be sure to spray inside with a cooking spray or wipe the inside of it with oil and place the ball of kneaded dough to rise until doubled in bulk. Be sure the plastic bag or bowl is large enough that it will permit the dough to double. You can place the bag or bowl of dough on a warm, sunny spot on the table or kitchen counter which helps it to rise.

When dough has doubled, punch it down and shape it. Form the dough into a ball about six to eight inches wide.
Using both hands, one on top of the other, press from the center outwards on it to start stretching it out, turning the dough a bit on each push. You can also pick up the dough and squeeze the edges of it while turning it like a steering wheel. This allows the weight of the dough to stretch it.

Once the dough is about 1/2" thick all the way around, use a rolling pin to flatten it out to about 1/4" thick. Run the pin over once or twice, flip the dough over and give it a quarter turn and roll it again to make it even. Roll it till there is approximately 1/4 inch over lapping the pizza pan edge

Take a fork and put puncture holes all over the dough. This keeps it from bubbling up while cooking. Transfer dough to the Deep Dish Pizza Pan that has been greased and dusted in cornmeal. Press over the bottom and up the sides of the pan.

In a frying pan, brown any meat and vegetables you will be using in the Priazzo.

Start stacking the ingredients starting with a layer of meat, sauce, then vegetable, then cheese, then meat, etc. Midway you can add a thin layer of crust half the size of the outside crust, being sure to coat it lightly with oil to limit moisture absorption. Proceed to continue the layering process until you reach the top of the pie. Cover each pie with dough that has also been punctured all over with a fork; crimp edges to seal.

Add the sauce and topping ingredients, spreading each ingredient evenly over the dough. Let this rise about 20 minutes in a warm place and then bake at 375, about 45 to 60 minutes, putting one Priazzo at a time on center rack of the preheated oven.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2007, 03:54:37 AM by slackshanger »

Offline Klankster

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #23 on: November 10, 2007, 12:24:03 PM »
Wow, thanks for the detailed response!  I'll report back when I've made the attempt at this.  I need to definitely get one of the heatsinks first.  It's a big investment but I think it'll be worth it.
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Offline WOP

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #24 on: March 15, 2008, 01:18:45 AM »
Not sure what others are talking about who claim they worked there and saw their advice was totally wrong.  I worked as a cook and assist manager for four years. 
1. The crust was the thin crust, no other crust.  We didnt recalibrate the thinness either.  The top part of the dough roller thins it to about quart of an inch and second roller thins it down to propper thinness.  Although you may have to roll this through a couple times to do so.
2. Sauce was the same.  Pizza hut has 2 types of sauce. Pizza sauce and breadstick sauce.  Breadstick sauce is also used for cavatini, spagetti.
3.Yes you will need heat sinc to properly cook your medium or large priazzo pizzas, but if you find a good heavy thin pan thats a small, you wont need to use them.  I made one for my employee meal almost every day i worked there and smalls never needed one, and always cooked through.  Just dont go crazy on the pizza sauce and wet ingridients...onions peppers mushrooms, they all contain water and will saturate your pizza without cooking out...unless you have a commercial oven capable of evenly cooking at 545 degrees.  Also if you do cook one, dont be opening the oven door to check on it, lose all the heat and you will need it.  It took 7 minutes for ours to cook one at work.
 4.  Perforation is key to making thin crust not bubble.  Simply poke holes with fork all over the surface of dough after its on pan.  At work they had a roller with spikes on it.  For second layer of dough you will have to do this on counter first.

Note...I have found making them at home very hard mostly due to how hard it is to replicate thin crust with no dough mixer. Thin crust is made with very little water and gains most of its moisture after the plastic sack is tied shut and is proofing.  I use a small stone pan for mine and works great in that regard.

Offline gitarslinger

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2008, 12:33:03 AM »
Not sure what others are talking about who claim they worked there and saw their advice was totally wrong.  I worked as a cook and assist manager for four years. 
1. The crust was the thin crust, no other crust.  We didnt recalibrate the thinness either.  The top part of the dough roller thins it to about quart of an inch and second roller thins it down to propper thinness.  Although you may have to roll this through a couple times to do so.
2. Sauce was the same.  Pizza hut has 2 types of sauce. Pizza sauce and breadstick sauce.  Breadstick sauce is also used for cavatini, spagetti. <snip>

It's obvious to me from the different posts that what constituted a Priazzo changed over time.  I was in Nicholasville, Kentucky when they were first introduced.  I'm not talking the full rollout; we were one of three test markets, iirc.  So the answer to "how to make a Priazzo" would seem to depend entirely on when.

The crust, at first, was absolutely *not* thin crust (maybe it was in some franchises, but from rollout to cancellation in ours, it never was).  Sheeter settings were the same for thin and Priazzo.  It was a much wetter crust with a good dose of corn meal.  It was the oddest thing I ever saw.  It would start out hard and seemingly way too dry.  By early evening, it was wetter and sheeted well.  By the end of the evening, it was a soggy horrid mess that would tear easily.  Go figure.  There were no "italian herbs" in it back then.  Just flour, yeast, salt, oil, water, corn meal.  Couldn't tell you the exact figures, as it was definitely the "magic bag" thing.  Anyway, if you want an authentic crust, you'll need to roll it out thin, flat and even to emulate the mechanical sheeter.

The sauce was also very different, but simple.  It was never pre-cooked.  Just half/half tomato sauce and tomato paste with the "magic bag" of spices.  The spices were definitely salt, pepper, basil and enough oregano to choke a man to death.  I couldn't tell you what else was in it; the oregano buried everything else.  Thick, nasty, bitter stuff.

Oh, yeah, and there was no "bread stick" sauce at the time.  At least in our franchise, bread sticks were rolled out after Priazzo had come and gone.

The pan was a deep dish pan with sharp tops.  We'd sheet a bottom layer, ladle in the sauce (yes, there was a specific Priazzo ladle, unlike the usual sauce spoons), spread the ingredients while trying to leave about half an inch between the ingredients and the wall of the pan (otherwise, all the saucy gunk would squeeze up and ruin the seal between top and bottom crust).  Then another layer of crust which would rest on the inner gunk and had to be formed to the walls.  The whole thing would be sealed by cutting the crusts together with a small handheld roller along the sharp top of the pan.  After that, the top sauce and cheese would go on, in would go the heat sink, and into the oven the whole mess would go.  Yeah, I hated Priazzos.  Hated the taste, hated fighting the dough, hated the fake Italian name.  But some of you like 'em, so I'm here to help if I can.  :-)

The standard cheese mix was cheddar, mozzarella and jack.  The Napoli was your usual mozzarella, cheddar, romano and parmesan.

Anyway, good luck with it.  You can have it! 

Jim

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2008, 09:09:47 AM »
Jim,

Thanks for the additional detail on the Priazzo. I have a few follow-up questions that you might be able to answer:

1) Can you explain a bit more how the roller/sheeter was used to prepare the dough sheets so that one might simulate the process at home using a rolling pin?

1) Was the pan a "cutter" pan by any chance? A cutter pan has a sharp edge that allows one to form a nice round skin by draping a large (oversized) sheet of dough over the pan and using a rolling pin to apply force across the top of the pan to cut the sheet of dough into a perfectly round skin. Do you remember if the pan had straight sides and how deep it was?

3) What sizes did the Priazzo come in, and how did you determine how much dough to use for each size?

4) Were both skins cut directly on the pan, and did you have to pinch or crimp the two skins together, either by hand or using a tool of some sort, to form a good seal?

5) Was the dough fermented at room temperature before forming into skins? That could help explain the changes in the dough over the course of the day.

6) Was there a particular ratio of the three cheeses used (cheddar, mozzarella and Jack)? If a premade cheese blend was used, did one of the cheeses predominate over the others in terms of flavor?

7) What kind of oven was used to bake the Priazzos and at what temperature and for how long?

Thanks.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 24, 2008, 09:19:40 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline gitarslinger

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2008, 07:07:32 PM »
Jim,

Thanks for the additional detail on the Priazzo. I have a few follow-up questions that you might be able to answer:

<snip> Thanks.

Peter

Peter,

I'll answer your questions as best I can, numbering them as you did.

1)  It was a standard restaurant dough sheeter, with a top feed that would flatten the dough ball to maybe a cm, then a second belt feeder that would flatten it further.  Seems to me there's no science in replicating it.  Just roll it to a thin, even layer, and not lightly.  The thickness was the same as a Pizza Hut thin crust, but tended to be thinner in the finished product simply for consisting partially of corn meal, which obviously doesn't rise.

2)  The pan was definitely a cutter pan, straight sides, heavy gauge, coated.  No more than 1.5 inches in depth.  I found a similar pan online at http://www.foodservicedirect.com/index.cfm/S/308/CLID/3627/N/98411/Hard_Coat_Anodized_Pizza_Pan_Heavy_Weight.htm

3)  I can't recall the sizes after 24 years, I'm afraid.  :-)  I think the largest was 16 inches, followed by 12?  As for the dough, we'd just grab a handful out of the box that seemed like it would do the trick.  Easy when you're standing by a hundred pounds of dough in a bucket.  I would say that since the crusts are much thinner than your average Chicago stuffed pizza that if you size your dough recipe according to a stuffed crust recipe, you'll have more than enough.  Getting it exact isn't important, because:

4)  Both skins are indeed cut directly on the pan.  I'm remembering we had to spray the pans with pan release and bake them before using them the first time.  We tended to spray a little pan release every time we made one.  It helped form the dough to the pan, may have helped release the pie after baking, but certainly created a Priazzo oil miasma over by the dough sheeter.  Anyway, yes, place the first crust in the pan, forming it to the straight sides and laying the excess over the edge.  Spread the sauce to about a cm from the edge, but not all the way.  Add the ingredients on top of the sauce.  Lay the top crust over, forming it to the ingredient layer and then to the sides, being careful not to squish the ingredients all the way to the edge (otherwise it'll run up between the two crusts and ruin the seal), and lay the excess over the pan edge.  There should still be just less than a cm of lip above the second crust.   Put on your top ingredients (a little more sauce and "Priazzo Cheese"), then cut the excess dough off with a roller.  No other crimping involved.

5)  Yes, the dough was fermented at room temperature.  So was the thin crust dough, but it didn't have the same variability.  Thin crust became usable about two to three hours after mixing, and was at its best just before close.  Priazzo dough was perfect for all of about ten minutes...  Ok, I'm exaggerating.  Twenty minutes.

6)  The Priazzo cheese actually came pre-shredded, pre-mixed and frozen, but it looked like a 1:1:1 ratio.

7)  Ten minutes in a forced-air conveyor oven, but I don't remember the temp.  If you're going to do that, don't forget the heat sink.  I think it very likely that a standard deep dish baking time on a pizza stone in a standard home oven would do the trick and save you the purchase of a heat sink.

Of course, for ourselves, we started making stuffed pizzas out of thin crust dough with the regular sauce and ordinary cheese.  Those weren't bad at all.  :-)

Hope all this malarkey helps!

Jim

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #28 on: March 24, 2008, 07:51:12 PM »
Jim,

Than you for the explanations.

You mentioned using cutter pans with straight sides about 1 1/2" deep. Most cutter pans that I am aware of, including the ones you referenced at the foodservicedirect.com website, have sloping sides and are less than an inch deep. This leads me to believe that the pans were made especially for PH. I've seen this sort of thing before with PH.

From your description, it sounds like the pie pretty much filled the entire depth of the pan, with less than a half inch at the top of the pie (above the second crust) for additional sauce and the cheese blend. Is that correct? It sounds like the pizza was about 1 1/2" thick. Is that right?

In paragraph 5, you mentioned that the Priazzo dough was fermented at room temperature. Was that for pretty much the entire day from the time the dough was made? I assume by your reference to 20 minutes that you meant to say that the dough deteriorated fairly quickly after being made, at least in your opinion, but was "perfect" for about 20 minutes.

Finally, was the word "miasma" from the PH Priazzo manual? 8)

Peter

Offline gitarslinger

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #29 on: March 25, 2008, 12:33:31 AM »
Jim,

Than you for the explanations.

You mentioned using cutter pans with straight sides about 1 1/2" deep. Most cutter pans that I am aware of, including the ones you referenced at the foodservicedirect.com website, have sloping sides and are less than an inch deep. This leads me to believe that the pans were made especially for PH. I've seen this sort of thing before with PH.

From your description, it sounds like the pie pretty much filled the entire depth of the pan, with less than a half inch at the top of the pie (above the second crust) for additional sauce and the cheese blend. Is that correct? It sounds like the pizza was about 1 1/2" thick. Is that right?

In paragraph 5, you mentioned that the Priazzo dough was fermented at room temperature. Was that for pretty much the entire day from the time the dough was made? I assume by your reference to 20 minutes that you meant to say that the dough deteriorated fairly quickly after being made, at least in your opinion, but was "perfect" for about 20 minutes.

Finally, was the word "miasma" from the PH Priazzo manual? 8)

Peter

The cutter pan was nearly 1.5" deep with straight sides.  The pizza itself was about an inch thick across the middle, but there was a "rim" of maybe 3/8 inch.  I expect you're correct about them being custom-made.  As for the pan url I supplied, I actually drilled down through a series of links, one of which was "straight-sided pans."  This was further down that tree.  Looking at it, it's either tapered or a trick of the camera angle.  Good luck finding a pan!

The dough, like the thin crust dough, was kneaded in a Hobart then dumped into a plastic bucket, and there it sat at room temp all day.  It had to ferment for maybe three hours before it was optimum.  By mid-evening, it was usually becoming a problem.  Of course I was joking about it being optimum for 20 minutes.  But when you're on the line making pizzas, it kind of feels that way.

I don't think the Priazzo manual said "miasma."  I think it mentioned a black cloud of oily death, now that I think of it.  :-)

Jim


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #30 on: March 25, 2008, 09:07:51 AM »
Jim,

Thanks again.

I took a look at the American Metalcraft website itself and it shows that their so-called CAR pans, which do not have rolled edges, are all tapered and quite shallow: http://www.amnow.com/pizzaTrays/carPans.html. The other well known supplier of cutter pans is pizzatools.com, and all of their cutter pans are tapered and shallow also. pizzatools.com has a sister company, Lloyd Industries, that sells custom pizza pans, so that may be a possible source. Another member, slackshanger, suggested a pan from Chef's Planet but I could not find it at their website. I suppose that members who wish to make a Priazzo clone may have to use a standard deep dish pan with straight sides and rolled edges and trim the two dough skins at the top edge of the pan. After all these years, it is unlikely that there are a lot of old Priazzo pans hanging around, even on eBay.

Do you recall by any chance how much a bag of the Priazzo flour mix weighed and how much water was added to that bag of flour mix? That would give us a pretty good idea as to the hydration used. 

Peter

Offline gitarslinger

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #31 on: March 25, 2008, 11:23:16 AM »
Jim,

Thanks again.

<snip>

Do you recall by any chance how much a bag of the Priazzo flour mix weighed and how much water was added to that bag of flour mix? That would give us a pretty good idea as to the hydration used. 

Peter

I certainly don't.  We'd use the same flour for priazzo as everything else.  The "magic bag" itself was of course much larger than the others by virtue of all the corn meal.  Water was dispensed from a pitcher that had colored levels printed on them, so I never actually knew the water volume except by "fill it to the orange line for the 16 inch."  Of course, we'd adjust that down simply so we'd have something we could use by the end of the day.

All I can say is the standard recipe made a smooth dough ball without any apparent segmenting, which would argue hydration was on the high side.

Jim

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #32 on: March 25, 2008, 12:50:44 PM »
Jim,

Thanks again for answering all of my questions. Maybe now there is enough collectively in this thread to allow other members to attempt a Priazzo clone pizza.

Peter

Offline gitarslinger

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #33 on: March 25, 2008, 01:06:10 PM »
Jim,

Thanks again for answering all of my questions. Maybe now there is enough collectively in this thread to allow other members to attempt a Priazzo clone pizza.

Peter

I had two other thoughts on the pan.  First, it had a rounded base.  Second, I'm wondering if one couldn't buy a 2" hard-coated pan, run it to a machine shop and have the rolled edge cut off.  Obviously the new edge would be missing its protective coat, but when caring for a single pan, that's not a difficult issue.

Jim

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #34 on: March 25, 2008, 01:37:44 PM »
Jim,

That may well work. However, I think the greatest impediment to making the Priazzo pizza, at least as it was done by PH, is the cost of the spider heat sinks. As noted here, http://www.amnow.com/pizzaSupplies/heatSinks.html and here http://www.twinsupply.com/proddetail.asp?prod=HS444, they can be quite expensive. If one were assured of making a Priazzo clone that was very close to the original, they might decide to spring for a heat sink, or look to find a cheaper one on eBay or elsewhere, and hope to amortize its cost over a large number of future Priazzo pizzas. It may well be that one can adjust bake times and temperatures to avoid having to use a heat sink, as you and others mentioned earlier in this thread, but most people are disinclined to do the necessary experimentation to get bake times and temperatures just right. In my experience on the forum, with all kinds of recipes, most people want simplicity, and if something sounds the least bit complicated and might require a lot of experimenting with dough formulations and the like, or buying items that are product-specific, like heat sinks, or cutting rims off of pans, they will not proceed. It's the diehard fan that might go forward and not be deterred by any obstacles, just as member slackhangers did with his recipes for his Priazzo clones. When I did my research on the Priazzo pizzas, I found slackhangers' Priazzo clone recipes at several different places on the internet. In fact, his stuff was just about all I found of any substance.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 25, 2008, 01:39:32 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline gitarslinger

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #35 on: March 25, 2008, 01:56:01 PM »
Jim,

That may well work. However, I think the greatest impediment to making the Priazzo pizza, at least as it was done by PH, is the cost of the spider heat sinks. As noted here, http://www.amnow.com/pizzaSupplies/heatSinks.html and here http://www.twinsupply.com/proddetail.asp?prod=HS444, they can be quite expensive. If one were assured of making a Priazzo clone that was very close to the original, they might decide to spring for a heat sink, or look to find a cheaper one on eBay or elsewhere, and hope to amortize its cost over a large number of future Priazzo pizzas. It may well be that one can adjust bake times and temperatures to avoid having to use a heat sink, as you and others mentioned earlier in this thread, but most people are disinclined to do the necessary experimentation to get bake times and temperatures just right. In my experience on the forum, with all kinds of recipes, most people want simplicity, and if something sounds the least bit complicated and might require a lot of experimenting with dough formulations and the like, or buying items that are product-specific, like heat sinks, or cutting rims off of pans, they will not proceed. It's the diehard fan that might go forward and not be deterred by any obstacles, just as member slackhangers did with his recipes for his Priazzo clones. When I did my research on the Priazzo pizzas, I found slackhangers' Priazzo clone recipes at several different places on the internet. In fact, his stuff was just about all I found.

Peter

The thing to remember about the heat sink is that the Priazzo, when all is said and done, is just another stuffed pizza.  It was no thicker than a Giordano's.  It should cook like any other stuffed pizza, for which there are plenty of tried and true recipes.  The heat sink, if I had to lay money on it, was only necessary because of the high-temp short-time cooking of the conveyor oven.  If PH had still been using old-fashioned ovens, they'd have simply resorted to a longer cooking time.

If I were going to try an original Priazzo, I'd:

1)  Find an existing sauce recipe that's heavy on tomato paste and oregano and isn't cooked

2)  Use Slackhanger's dough recipe but without any spices, and let it rise for about three hours

3)  Use a top cheese mix of 1:1:1 cheddar, mozzarella and jack (and use this inside, too, unless you're making the four-cheese or the florentine)

4)  Use a hard-coat straight-sided pan of 1.5" depth and just cut the excess dough off with a pair of scissors; it doesn't have to look perfect to taste right

5)  Cook it like you would any Chicago stuffed pizza of the same size and forget the heat sink (unless you're forced use a high-temp forced-air conveyor oven optimized for pan pizzas).

I'd do it myself, except I never liked Priazzos.  I was raised on Chicago stuffed-crust pizzas, and Priazzos always seemed very poor imitations that missed the boat entirely.  But the trick is in the dough and the sauce.  Everything else was standard PH ingredients.

Let me know how it goes if you try one.

Jim

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #36 on: March 25, 2008, 02:15:46 PM »
Let me know how it goes if you try one.

Jim,

My pizza dance card is full at the moment, so for now I was trying just to act as a facilitator for those who have indicated a strong interest in the Priazzo clones. However, if I decide to attempt a Priazzo clone, I will report on my results in this thread. I would perhaps be inclined in any event to use the deep-dish dough calculating tool and its stuffed pizza feature, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dd_calculator.html, to come up with the right amounts of ingredients for the type and size of pan used, for whatever dough formulation I might decide to use.

Peter

Offline Gail

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #37 on: May 09, 2011, 11:30:38 AM »
Priazzo was NOT the thin crust, thin crust would dry out on top and be soggy in the bottom.  It also crumbled when we tried to take it from the pan.  The thin dough also would not roll out as flat as the Priazza dough, and the priazza dough did not proof like the other and even the thin dough proofed. (very little leven)  The dough for Priazza was more like a pie type that did not get the air in it like the other pizza's.  We tried to subsitute thin once when we ran out of, "Priazzo corn meal dough."  (the exact name for the dough on the package) I worked as a shift supervisor for several years.  I remember the bags from the company had cornmeal in it.  The temp of the water was between 105 and 109 degree.  The thin crust would not work because the cornmeal did not let the dough get soggy on the bottom.  We didnot get the recipe for anything at Pizza Hut, the dough came in premixed bags.  Even the spices were in premixed packages.  We added tomato paste to the sauce packages and 2 cans of water.  I remember reading on the packages Garlic Powder, basil, marjoram oregano, and salt, but don't know the amounts.

Offline Pizzamaster

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #38 on: May 09, 2011, 04:58:10 PM »
The sauce and cheese used was from the handtossed pizza.

Offline aeo

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Re: Pizza Hut Priazzo?
« Reply #39 on: August 06, 2011, 10:11:18 PM »
Perhaps I am mistaken, but I could swear that the priazzo milano had ricotta cheese on it.  I miss this pizza so bad.  Pizza Hut would do much better if they brought the priazzo line back.