Author Topic: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles  (Read 32024 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline wuzguna

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 4
  • I Love Pizza!
fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« on: July 14, 2005, 08:31:08 PM »
     I'm  new to the site and have reading all the post on equipment and recipes and very excited to try and make my first pizza. I just bought a garland commercial range with dual 29" ovens and would like to know what you guys think I should get a fibrament stone or quarry tiles. Looking at some of pictures some members have posted it seems like the tiles would slide around not to mention I can't find any.


Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2005, 10:02:38 PM »
I am looking forward to answers to your questions as well.  I do know you can find the quarry tiles fairly easily at tile stores.  But I have long been curious about what advantages, if any, fibrament offers over tiles or a regular pizza stone.

Offline Nathan

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 235
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2005, 01:41:44 AM »
I'd get the Fibrament for sure.  I have a 19 inch and I LOVE it.  I've never used quarry tiles but I don't think I'd like them as much as the stone. 
"Pizza with pineapples?  That's a cake."

Offline JimBob

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 87
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Ohio
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2005, 06:15:30 AM »
I'm using a Fibrament stone and love it.  If you order directly from the manufacturer you can even specify the size of the stone you need.
JimBob

Offline Les

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 199
  • Age: 67
  • It's Proper to use Grape Tomatoes in Wine Country
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2005, 09:46:18 AM »
I'm using a Fibrament stone and love it. If you order directly from the manufacturer you can even specify the size of the stone you need.

At the website I was at, it seemed they would only customize it for professionals, as in restaurants, etc.  I couldn't find the option for home use.  Do you have a link to where you bought yours, and can you tell us how you got them to customize for you?

Offline JimBob

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 87
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Ohio
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2005, 10:27:55 AM »
Check the FAQ page at: http://www.bakingstone.com/faq.php

"#6  How do I place an order for a custom size stone?

    First, e-mail us with your size requirements.  Include your shipping address so we can provide you with delivery charges.  Once you receive our quote, enter your dimensions in the CUSTOM SIZE SECTION on the ORDER FORM.  Put the total sale amount in the Comments/Additional Instructions Section at the very bottom of the Billing and Shipping Information Page.

If I were ordering a custom size stone I would probably phone in the order.
JimBob

Offline PizzaPolice

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 435
  • Location: N/W Indiana
  • WFO-Where Art & Physics meet - Heat is the Arbiter
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2005, 11:42:14 AM »
Wuzguna

I have used both.  I have a big rectangular Fibrament and lined tiles on top to mimic the cozy pizza oven's thermal mass.  The Fibrament is wonderful - no doubt about it.  However, my brother and I converted two commercial ovens into pizza ovens using the quarry tiles.  For a Relay for Life event, we threw 90 pizzas (actually 89 - I dropped one dough showing off).  The tiles worked beautifully.  They had a funky design on the bottoms but were quite tasty.  They slipped a little but were easily adjusted.
I reccommend you start with the tiles.  For a modest investment you can run with the big dogs.  Hoo yah!

Offline Ronzo

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1407
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Leander, TX
  • Beer, freedom n' pizza...
    • New Texian Brewery
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2005, 11:52:24 AM »
I reccommend you start with the tiles. For a modest investment you can run with the big dogs. Hoo yah!

I find my tiles seem to work just as well or better than the pizza stone I had that cracked. They are a WHOLE lot cheaper...

Less than $14 for a box of 16 8x8 tiles. Enough to do four ovens at 4 tiles on one rack. Or two ovens at two deep on one rack.


Go to Lowes and check in their tile section for Unglazed Quarry Tiles. That's where I found mine.
Fuggheddabowdit!

~ Ron

Former NY'er living in Texas
http://newtexianbrew.com - http://ronlennex.com/ - http://pinterest.com/NewTexianBrew

Offline wuzguna

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 4
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2005, 06:50:21 PM »
Wow, thanx for all the replies. based on your suggestions I'm gonna go with 19" round fibrament stone for 50 bucks and if I find quarry tiles I'll use them above the tile. 

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21704
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2005, 06:58:52 PM »
wuzguna,

You will want to make sure that a 19" stone will fit in your oven before ordering one. It won't fit in mine.

Peter


Offline TonyTrey

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 4
  • I'm a llama!
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2006, 11:22:31 PM »
I recently received my 15" X 18" stone.  The curing process sure caused a lot of odor, but after following the schedule, it has no smell at all.  I cooked two pies on it and look forward to cooking on it some more.  I would have thought the shiny smooth side would have been on the top & not the rough side.  but anyhow, this stone is thicker than others I have used.  I've had 3 kit stones break on me.  This Fibrament is thicker & comes with a 10-year warranty.   

Offline ihavezippers

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 129
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #11 on: March 21, 2006, 09:20:05 PM »
Just curious---where would one pick up a fibrament stone?  I don't suppose Cash and Carry carries fibrament.

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21704
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #12 on: March 21, 2006, 09:34:47 PM »
ihavezippers,

The Fibrament stones are sold at several places online (just do a Google search) but many people buy them directly from the manufacturer, at http://www.bakingstone.com/. I have not read of any case where someone bought the stone at a retail outlet. If you decide to buy a stone, whether it is a Fibrament or some other brand, I would get a good-sized one that will both fit within your oven and give you the largest size pizza you think you will want to make. Tiles are a reasonable alternative if cost is a factor.

Peter

Offline ihavezippers

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 129
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2006, 01:01:45 PM »
so fibrament is a brand of stone, not a type of stone?  is it also the "professional" grade of pizza stones?  in other words, a pizza stone i might pick up at bed, bath and beyond wouldn't be of the same quality?

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21704
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2006, 02:09:46 PM »
ihavezippers,

Fibrament is a brand but it also represents a particular proprietary composite of materials. As you will note at the Fibrament website, their stones are used by many professionals. I haven't checked with Bed, Bath & Beyond in quite a while, but what you will want to look for is a fairly thick stone, about 3/4" thick. Many of the stone I have seen at places like BB&B tend to be fairly thin and not particularly big. Small, thin stones will have limited mass and, hence, less heat retention. So, if you plan to make several pizzas in succession, you will have to let the stone heat up again between pies.

To get a good idea about the types of stones, tiles, materials and their good and bad features, you may want to read a typical thread on stones/tiles. A good thread to read is this one: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1488.0.html. You will also note in the last post on that thread I aggregrated links to other threads on stones, tile, etc. In the final analysis, your decision on what to buy or use will turn on what you hope to achieve from using the stone/tiles, the sizes of pizza you want to make, and your budget.

Peter

Offline Lydia

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 831
  • Location: NORTHERN ALABAMA
    • Viddler
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2006, 09:31:16 PM »
Broke my 3rd stone! :(

Two in one week. >:(

I'm getting a couple of fibrament stones. The way I see it.... the cost should be well worth it.
Especially with the warranty. If it busts, I'm covered.

and even better, I can get the plate that allows it to be used on the grill.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline John39840

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 66
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2006, 04:31:56 AM »
I'll have to admit, those Fibrament stones do look awefully nice. :)

Offline Jack

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 404
  • Location: WA
  • Pizza; it's what's for dinner, breakfast........
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2007, 11:34:30 AM »
I just finished cooking my first few pies on a Fibrament stone.  The additional mass and engineered thermal properties are phenomenal, blowing away my Old Faithful Pampered Chef Terra Cotta stone.  At $53 delivered, its hard to beat.  http://www.bakingstone.com/index.php

While the performance of thicker and larger stones has been discussed previously, the one thing I noticed is that many of us have eyed the big 19 inch round stone, but indicated that their oven is not big enough for the 19 and the next size down is too small.  I had the same issue, as my oven was just over 18 inches deep where I would place the stone.  Being a persistent Engineer who used to work in an industry where we used refractory I called the folks at Fibrament and discussed trimming the stone to fit.  We discussed cutting techniques, clearances, etc. and I ended up ordering a stone.  When it arrived, I drew two parallel lines on the stone, on opposite sides of the stone, to trim approximately 3/8 of an inch off opposite sides of the stone using a bench grinder.  An angle grinder would do the job too, but not quite as easily.  The Fibrament stone is relatively easy to grind.  Its significantly faster to grind the stone than to grind away carbon steel.  I found no chipping at all during the grinding.  Obviously, the thickness of the material will determine the rate of material removal from the stone, so working from two opposite sides has two benefits; you can grind the thinner edges faster and doing this provides a symmetrical finished cooking surface. 

I test fit the stone a few times as I wanted to make the stone about inch smaller than the oven to allow for expansion, although the stone wont expand nearly that much.  The way I verified that the stone would fit was to leave it forward on the oven rack, then close the door, pushing the stone back with the oven door until the door was completely closed.  Once the door has been opened up again, the stone can be slid back by hand until it touches the back wall of the oven.  This amount is the fraction of an inch I wanted to leave for expansion.

Customer Service - My first stone was dropped hard on its edge by UPS, actually cutting through the edge of the box.  The stone was well packed, but the package was abused.  I documented the damage when I contacted UPS, as my delivery guy drops and runs.  I also forwarded the pictures to the stone manufacturer for their information, but did not request a new stone from them, as I had from UPS.  The Fibrament folks immediately shipped a new stone, prior to UPS contacting them.  I give them Huge Kudos for great customer service.

One last item while the directions for the Fibrament stone are clear about a staged heating the first time, Id like to reiterate how important this is.  I used to spend days drying out the refractory in large incinerators.  Heated too fast, the water in the stone will turn to steam and can blow the refractory apart.  If you ever get the stone really wet, which should not happed if you keep it in the oven at all times, Id dry it out gradually again over a few hours.  This drying out process will emit a wet concrete smell, so plan on some additional ventilation.  I have noticed that having the stone in the oven all the time does improve the cooking most other things we prepare in the oven, although it does take longer to heat up.

The bottom line If your oven is near 18 inches on the smaller dimension and you are comfortable working with your hands, go for it.  You are essentially grinding concrete.  Virtually any decent sized grinding device and a pair of safety glasses is all you need. 

I anyone wants me to, Ill post some pictures of the modified edges.

Jack
Enginerd

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21704
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2007, 01:25:12 PM »
Jack,

That was a great post. Very informative.

Even though I already have a Fibrament stone (a smaller, rectangular one) and don't have immediate plans to go with a 19" size, I would like to see a photo or two of your modifications. I think others would too.

Thanks.

Peter

Offline Jack

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 404
  • Location: WA
  • Pizza; it's what's for dinner, breakfast........
Re: fibrament stone vs quarry tiles
« Reply #19 on: January 11, 2007, 01:49:20 AM »
Here we go. . .

The first one is a view of the ground edge.  This is a pretty dense material, so you get a nice smooth edge.  I may go back an touch this up with a Dremel to make it perfect, but there are no sharp edges there.

The second shows how little I needed to trim off.  I did the same on the opposite edge of the stone and have about 1/8 of an inch of clearance between the stone and the oven surfaces.

Jack
« Last Edit: January 11, 2007, 01:57:48 AM by Jack »