Author Topic: Kitchenaid mixers which one?  (Read 5914 times)

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Offline weaverpizza

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Re: Kitchenaid mixers which one?
« Reply #20 on: June 20, 2006, 08:03:50 AM »
Very good.

Yes, Scott, I have the artisan and the DLX.  I meant the Pro 600 as you said.  The artisan does not really knead well unless I use a wooden handle (read somewhat dangerous) to keep the dough from riding around on the C hook.  The wet knead technique may be the ticket then adding the last flour.  With all high gluten that may work well but for fresh ground whole wheat, its bran needs 5 to 10 minutes for it to properly absorb water.  I have made 4 batch recipes in the DLX nicely with mostly high gluten flour or 50/50 and they come out fine at around 60% hydration with the roller scraper.  The roller kneads the best in my opinion.

Lydia, I agree that the Pro 600 is the way to go as far as KA.  Good comment on an upcoming bowl.  That is interesting.  Has your mixer thermal tripped yet?  Can you really use it hard before it gets too warm to trip it?

So many repair comments though on Amazon re the KAs.  At least they do have good customer experience.  I have dealt with then 2 or 3 times across the years.

Someone here mentioned the Bosch Universal mixer.  I have access to one to try.  I wonder if any one has significant experience with that on pizza doughs.

Stay well.


Offline KAidVerne

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Re: Kitchenaid mixers which one?
« Reply #21 on: June 20, 2006, 01:21:52 PM »
FYI, a new 3 quart bowl with a "combi whip" will be available soon (September) for the Pro 5 PLUS and Pro 600 mixers.  It is NOT to be used for kneading, however.  It will use a combi whip much like was present on our mixers in the 1950s.

Offline Lydia

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Re: Kitchenaid mixers which one?
« Reply #22 on: June 20, 2006, 06:08:59 PM »
Thanks KAvern

I was having a bit of trouble finding all the details on the combi-whip within the KA forum.  I must of have had 5 qt on my brain when reading about the combi-bowl. Thanks so much for the correction.

Mike

 I had an older model Bosch. It could handle more dough than the KA 6qt. It kneaded better than the KA C-hook, but the KA spiral knead more efficiently than the older Bosch. Also the older version I had shimmied all over the place when mixing higher lower hydration doughs. I literal had to hold onto it for dear life!

From what I saw regarding repairs: they seemed to primary revolve around the non-metal gears. What I'm understanding is that the gears were "designed???" to blow to protect the engine. Since the gears are at least 3x times cheaper to replace than the engine.

May KAvern can clarify for us.

My semolina dough (medium hydration) needs 8 minutes on the KA at about levels 3-5, the Epicurean would get warm but I would flucutate the levels to prevent over heating. I will find out soon how the Pro 600 does.

Randy's drastically low hydration "KA thin crust" is in my line-up, but I think it has a very short mix time.

I promise I'll reports as soon as I can.


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Offline Lydia

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Re: Kitchenaid mixers which one?
« Reply #23 on: June 22, 2006, 01:32:07 PM »
Mike

I was browsing some more at the KA forum about the Pro600.

Quotes are from this KA thread http://forum.kitchenaid.com/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7355 It's a short thread but the first posters story may interest you.

 
Quote
Because bread flour is a specialty flour, it produces a much heavier & dense dough, only 8 cups is advisable.


There were recommendations to break-in the mixer with some lighter load recipes (cake and cookies were mentioned).

Quote
In the new 600 series there are all metal gears, which generate more heat than the nylon/metal combo..hence the thermal overload feature. When the mixer turns off, it's because it was too hot. Not to say that the mixer has failed at this point..the thermal overload protection has come into play. Normally the mixer will turn back on after a few minutes rest, in the OFF position.

One thing you might consider when you have the new mixer, is making a few "basic" recipes first. Familiarize yourself with the mixer on cookies or cakes initially..When you're ready to move on to specialty bread recipes, add about 6- 6.5 cups of flour initially, then add the rest about a 1/4 cup at a time..until you "see" the dough is ready. This should take about 2-4 minutes (kneading) total. Please come back and let us know if this helps..sure hope so!



Last week I did a double batch of Steve Quick N EZ NY, and experienced no problems (just under 2 pounds of HG flour but it's a high hydration formula).

I just mixed up DKM/Randy's KA thin crust. I forgot that this lower hydration dough wasn't kneaded, so I have nothing to report. This formula has me very intrigued  :o

It will probably be my Semolina recipe that trips the mixer since it's made with a heavier flour . Ironically, this is the one I use most often.  ::) I'm hoping  it won't need the full 8 minutes with the new spiral hook.

I will continue to post on my experiences with the Pro 600.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.