Author Topic: Homemade Pepperoni  (Read 17084 times)

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Offline LD

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Homemade Pepperoni
« on: December 17, 2010, 01:13:06 PM »
I see people discussing their pepperoni recipe and some very nice pictures but no recipes posted.  Does anyone know of a recipe posted for pepperoni, I have had no luck with the search function.  I started making my own Chorizo as I was sick of the greasy slop on sale in stores.  I would like to try my hand and pepperoni as well. 


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2010, 01:39:26 PM »
Pepperoni is a dry-cured product, an order of magnitude more challenging than Mexican-style chorizo, a fresh sausage. Pepperoni and similar meats involve curing for a fairly long time in carefully controlled temperatures and humidities. The process can be unforgiving of fairly small errors. The method I use is from the book by the late Rutek Kutas, Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing.   

Offline LD

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2010, 04:09:16 PM »
Bill do you think that you could get the same flavor of pepperoni by doing a fresh sausage version rather then a cured version?  I know that the texture would be different between the two. 

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2010, 04:52:55 PM »
Bill do you think that you could get the same flavor of pepperoni by doing a fresh sausage version rather then a cured version?  I know that the texture would be different between the two. 

No. In addition to serving as a means of preserving, dry-curing creates unique textures and flavors. A fresh sausage version could be good, but not the same. There are additives used to emulate or accelerate the process, but I don't think I've ever tried them.   


Offline R2-Bayou

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2010, 03:49:10 PM »
I just finished curing peperone using the Ruhlman & Polcyn, Charcuterie recipe. It is all lean beef, which I thought would be a disaster, but is perfect for pizza because there is no extra rendered grease on the pie. It came out fantastic, and is delicious. Here is a picture of the links when I first hung them in my curing chamber.
"Wretched excess is just barely enough."

Offline Meatballs

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2011, 12:36:20 PM »
Pepperoni is not usually a dry cured product in the USA.  Most of the pepperoni you buy in this country is actually a cooked product.  Not to take anything away from dry cured, its a beautiful thing and mother sausage of pepperoni but...its easier to slow cook.  Check out this recipe that I plan to make this week: 

http://lpoli.50webs.com/index_files/Pepperoni-cooked.pdf

I make a lot of products like this but cook them more simply.  I make all sorts of sausages and lunch meats  In fact I made this week, a cooked 3 lb Capicola, 4 lbs of fresh Italian sausage (in a bulk log cut into 4 to 6 ounce pieces for pizza) and 3 pounds of fresh Southern breakfast sausage for my breakfast.  The pepperoni recipe outlined above is no more difficult.

Where I would diverge from the recipe given would be to cook the pepperoni in a sealed vacuum bag in a water bath for about 1 1/2 to 2 hours at 160 deg. F.  (easier to do than it sounds without anything more than a thermometer and a big pot).  As to cooking under vacuum (called sous vide) it is safe.  Particularly since this recipe is cured with Cure #1 (Prague powder).  The pepperoni will probably not need the boiling water dip but you could if casings are not adhered well.  If cooled quickly and left in the vacuum bag it will keep a long time under refrigeration and freeze exceedingly well.

If Interested, I can photograph and detail my preparation of this when I do it later in the week. I've been making sausage for almost 20 years and its really very easy.  A smoke house is not necessary but a small smoker is really nice, just to smoke and finish cooking as outlined above in a water bath.

Ron
« Last Edit: February 08, 2011, 12:46:16 PM by Meatballs »

Offline TONY

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2011, 01:17:35 PM »
R-2 Bayou,

How long did you cure the Pepperoni???

Tony

Offline R2-Bayou

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2011, 04:07:44 PM »
R-2 Bayou,

How long did you cure the Pepperoni???

Tony

The peperone spent about one month curing. They came out great, if a little over-cured. They work best on pizza, but as antipasto they are a little, not dry, but kinda rubbery. Sliced super thin on a deli slicer, and then vacuum packed they mellow out. Next time I will either do a shorter cure or use a larger diameter casing. The flavor is great.
"Wretched excess is just barely enough."

Offline Meatballs

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2011, 07:01:21 PM »
R2BAYOU,

Consider adding at least 50% pork to the recipe.  Beef dries and cures hard and the fat cures hard too.  I would expect an all beef pepperoni to be hard and dry even if it was cooked.  I use beef to adjust firmness in cured recipes, never by itself.

Ron

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2011, 07:29:58 PM »
I've had a great homemade sopressatta, wanted to make it myself and got the Paul Bertolli cooking by hand book.

I've come to realize curing meats should best be left to the professionals.  :-[


Offline Meatballs

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2011, 09:06:53 AM »
If you want to make dry cured products, the book...The Art of Making Fermented Sausages by Stanley and Adam Marianski will be far more approachable than any other text on the subject.  However, dry cured sausage is not for the beginner.  Its the highest form preserved meat and requires commercial bacteria cultures, at least 2% salt, specialized cure and controlled drying conditions of temperature an humidity.  You can make yourself sick with these products if not done properly.

Most products you are familiar with, lunch meats, pepperoni, summer sausage, etc. are cooked either in a temperature controlled smoker/oven or in a water bath or in a steam bath.  The temperature, regardless of method, is maintained below the melting point of fat but high enough to cook the product and sanitize it.  Generally you want to keep the cooking temperature at or below 165 F and cook to an internal temperature of 155 F, cooked and sanitized but fat still intact. 

There are may crazy recipes for sausage and cooked meat products around, some try to lower salt (dangerous), others try to avoid nitrates (suicidal).  Choose a simple smoked sausage recipe to start learning with, like cooked kielbasa.  Once that is mastered, the whole world of meats opens up.

The best general introduction to meat products is... Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing by Rytek Kutas.  Its available for about $18 from Amazon and is the best place to start.

Ron

Offline R2-Bayou

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2011, 03:01:04 PM »
"Wretched excess is just barely enough."

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2011, 03:54:41 PM »
Any of you guys know anything about making a lunch meat called thuringer, I believe it's smoked and similar to summer sausage. Also called cervalot (? spelling) in some German quarters.
Rest In Peace - November 1, 2014

Offline Meatballs

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2011, 05:22:43 PM »
Check out this link for Thuringer....

http://lpoli.50webs.com/index_files/thuringer.pdf

If you are interested in simplifying the process send me a note here.


Ron

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2011, 05:34:09 PM »
Thank you Meatballs, very interesting link. Do you make your own (is that in the picture), if so, would you like to sell me some? I've made my own sausage, so I guess I could give this a shot. Do you have a good source for the seasonings?
Rest In Peace - November 1, 2014

Offline jgestner

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2011, 05:04:41 PM »
Hi Meatball
I am interested in doing my own pepperoni and was particularly interested in your sous vide preparation. I am all set with the sous vide equipment but have never stuffed a sausage casing. I would be very interested in your pictures and any further explanation of procedures.

Thanks :pizza:
John
Merrill, WI
« Last Edit: April 28, 2011, 09:44:31 AM by jgestner »

Offline gtsum2

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2011, 07:27:49 PM »
smoke the pepperoni low and slow is how I do it...true dry curing is usually much to difficult to do in the home environment

Offline jgestner

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2011, 03:17:36 PM »
Hi Gang
I did a little more research and found that the Morton Tender Quick can be used for a pretty easy recipe found on their website at (WWW) mortonsalt.com/recipes/RecipeDetailPF.aspx?RID=46
Since I have almost all of the ingredients listed I think this will be my first attempt.


Morton Pepperoni Recipe

Prep Time:20 Minutes (Refrigerate Overnight)
Servings: 1 pound
 
Ingredients
1 pound lean ground beef
1-1/2 level teaspoons Morton® Tender Quick® mix or Morton® Sugar Cure® (plain)
1 teaspoon liquid smoke
3/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon mustard seed
1/2 teaspoon fennel seed, slightly crushed
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1/4 teaspoon anise seed
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder


Directions
Combine all ingredients, mixing until thoroughly blended. Divide mixture in half. Shape each half into slender roll about 1-1/2 inch in diameter. Wrap in plastic or foil. Refrigerate overnight. Unwrap rolls and place on broiler pan.
Bake at 325°F until a meat thermometer inserted in the center of a roll reads 160°F, 50 to 60 minutes. Store wrapped in refrigerator. Use within 3 to 5 days or freeze for later use. If Morton Meat Curing products are not available at your local grocery store, the products can be ordered throught the Morton Salt online store.

John :pizza:

I don't like the idea of baking this at 325 degrees, so I may try some lower and slower method to get to internal 160 degrees F.
 
« Last Edit: April 28, 2011, 03:21:26 PM by jgestner »

Offline PizzaHog

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2011, 04:06:51 PM »
Here is a somewhat similar recipe I bookmarked but never tried, with a much lower cook temp.
http://www.tammysrecipes.com/tammys_spicy_pepperoni

Offline bugsydog

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Re: Homemade Pepperoni
« Reply #19 on: November 29, 2011, 01:36:48 PM »
Meatballs,
 hope you could post some of your  photographs and detail in preparation, would like to see your approch and recipes, if its alright.