Author Topic: New and Improved Mozza Recipe  (Read 10228 times)

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Online tinroofrusted

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New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« on: November 20, 2011, 06:30:57 PM »
I took my inspiration for this dough recipe from Nancy Silverton's Mozza cookbook, which can be found at http://www.foodgal.com/2011/09/pure-pizza-dough-heaven-the-recipe-from-pizzeria-mozza/.  She is originally a bread baker so her pizza does have a kind of artisanal bread quality to it. Lots of air holes on the edge of the crust, and a really nice fully fermented flavor.

Starting with the Mozza basic ingredients, I have tweaked the recipe to the point where I feel it is really good, so I am sharing it with the pizzamaking.com community.  The changes from the original Mozza recipe are as follows:  

1. Instead of using a full tablespoon of yeast in the sponge and allowing it to ferment for 1.5 hours, I use 1/4 tsp. of yeast in the sponge, and leave it on the counter overnight.  Then the next morning I mix up the dough and allow it to ferment most of the day. By mid afternoon the dough should have risen sufficiently to make your dough balls.  

2. When mixing the dough, I add a small amount of sourdough starter.  This adds a certain something to the dough that I really love.  It isn't sour at all but the sourdough does contribute a very slight tang, and maybe helps to rise the dough a bit.

3. The Mozza recipe uses an electric mixer to mix the dough. Since this dough is long fermented, it doesn't need to be mixed in a mixer. It is a very extensible dough without any kneading (although you do need to give the dough a few "turns" during the first two hours).

It takes about 18 hours to complete this recipe so you need to plan in advance. Start the sponge the night before you plan to make pizzas.  Then the dough can be mixed in the morning and left to rise during the day. It should be ready to go by the late afternoon.  If you don't have time for this long-fermented version then try the original Mozza version (see link above) which takes about three hours.  

Sorry I don't have any photos of the results of this recipe. They do look nice.  Very thin crust with a puffy edge.  Next time I make a batch of this dough I will post photos.  

OK, here's the recipe: This makes about 6 pizza doughs of approx 8 oz each:

Ingredients:

22 oz water
1/4 tsp. yeast
13 oz. bread flour
13 oz. all-purpose flour (I use King Arthur)
1/2 oz. dark or medium rye flour
1.5 tsp wheat germ
1 tbsp sea salt
1.5 tsp barley malt or honey
1 tbsp. active sourdough starter


Method:

Make the sponge:

Mix 15 ounces of the water, the bread flour (13 oz.), the rye flour, the wheat germ, and the yeast in a bowl. Stir with a wooden spoon to combine.  Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and leave it on the counter for 12 hours. At the end of 12 hours the mixture will be bubbly and will have risen slightly.  

Make the dough:

In a bowl, combine the remaining water (7 oz.), the sourdough starter, and the barley malt. Mix well to dissolve the barley malt.  Add the sponge, the sea salt, and the all-purpose flour. Mix with a wooden spoon until you have a shaggy mass. Allow this mass to rest for 15 minutes, then with wet hands, pull it up out of the bowl, stretching it as far as it will go, then fold the dough over itself. Do this twice.  Cover the bowl and let the dough rest for 15 minutes, followed by two more stretches. Carry out these stretches, (also known as "turns") every 15 minutes for the first two hours the dough ferments. After two hours and eight turns, you should have a very smooth, extensible dough. Let it rise undisturbed for 2 to 3 more hours, (4-5 hours total rising time), or until it has approximately doubled in size. The dough should now be filled with air holes.  It will rise slowly since the amount of yeast used is comparatively small.  

Form the Dough Balls

When the dough is sufficiently risen, turn it out onto a floured surface, and separate it into six pieces of about 8 oz. each.  Make six dough balls and place them on a floured cookie pan or other container. Spray a piece of plastic wrap with spray oil and cover the dough balls so they don't dry out.  Let the dough balls rise for about 1.5 or 2 hours, until they are well risen.  

Form the Pizzas

When you form the pizzas, begin flattening the dough ball in the middle of the disc, pressing down and out so as to move the air pockets from the middle of the dough ball to the edge, preserving the cornichon so that it will puff up dramatically when baked.  After you have formed the pizza, lightly salt the the dough, and brush the rim of the dough with olive oil. Then dress the pizza to your taste and bake.  In my oven (550 degrees convection) they take about 5-6 minutes to bake.




« Last Edit: November 20, 2011, 06:34:42 PM by tinroofrusted »


Offline briterian

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2011, 10:00:39 AM »
Thanks,
Looks like you didn't take the hydration down from the 82% she used.  I tried her orig and would not try it again without dropping the hydration to sub 70%.    What are the benefits of such a wet dough?

« Last Edit: November 22, 2011, 10:46:17 AM by briterian »

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2011, 10:35:44 AM »
The wet dough seems to be good for home ovens that can't get much above 550 F.  The interior stays moist while the crust gets golden. And the crumb of the crust gets that "custardy" look that you get with really nice artisanal bread. That's not everyone's idea of great pizza but I like it.  Perhaps as a side benefit you don't need to knead the dough (but that's not a big deal to me). It develops all on its own.  

Having said that I think the recipe would still be very good if you lower the hydration a few degrees.  

For another recipe of an even higher hydration dough, try this one:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=13597.0

It's really more of a focaccia recipe than pizza, but as I recall it was really tasty.  Making a pizza at that extreme of hydration gives you a pretty good idea of what's good (and bad) about high hydration doughs. 

I should point out that doing the series of "turns" on the dough makes it much easier to work with when it comes time to make the dough balls and shape the pizzas.  Also, with these high hydration doughs you need to make liberal use of bench flour to assist with forming the dough balls and pizza skins. 

Regards,

Tin Roof
« Last Edit: November 22, 2011, 01:49:25 PM by tinroofrusted »

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2011, 09:18:00 AM »
When I originally posted this modified Mozza recipe, I didn't have any pictures, so here are some of my latest bake.  I made sausage and mushroom, and Brussels sprouts, guanciale (home cured), and feta cheese.  Both were good, but the Brussels sprouts and guanciale were especially good.  The crust was really delicious.  Hopefully you can see the nice airy crust edge that was produced with this recipe.  


I did make a small modification to the formula this time in that I added two more ounces of bread flour in an effort to make the dough a bit more manageable. The addition of two more ounces did make the dough quite a bit easier to shape. I didn't notice any negative effects from this change. Thus the recipe would be modified as follows:

Ingredients:

22 oz water
1/4 tsp. yeast
13 oz. bread flour (I use Conagra Mello Judith)
15 oz. all-purpose flour (I use King Arthur)
1/2 oz. dark or medium rye flour
1.5 tsp wheat germ
1 tbsp sea salt
1.5 tsp barley malt or honey (barley malt preferred)
1 tbsp. active sourdough starter


Method:

Make the sponge:

Mix 15 ounces of the water, the bread flour (13 oz.), the rye flour, the wheat germ, and the yeast in a bowl. Stir with a wooden spoon to combine.  Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and leave it on the counter for 12 hours. At the end of 12 hours the mixture will be bubbly and will have risen slightly.  

Make the dough:

In a bowl, combine the remaining water (7 oz.), the sourdough starter, and the barley malt. Mix well to dissolve the barley malt.  Add the sponge, the sea salt, and the all-purpose flour. Mix with a wooden spoon until you have a shaggy mass. Allow this mass to rest for 15 minutes, then with wet hands, pull it up out of the bowl, stretching it as far as it will go, then fold the dough over itself. Do this twice.  Cover the bowl and let the dough rest for 15 minutes, followed by two more stretches. Carry out these stretches, (also known as "turns") every 15 minutes for the first two hours the dough ferments. After two hours and eight turns, you should have a very smooth, extensible dough. Let it rise undisturbed for 2 to 3 more hours, (4-5 hours total rising time), or until it has approximately doubled in size. The dough should now be filled with air holes.  It will rise slowly since the amount of yeast used is comparatively small.  

Form the Dough Balls

When the dough is sufficiently risen, turn it out onto a floured surface, and separate it into six pieces of about 8 oz. each.  Make six dough balls and place them on a floured cookie pan or other container. Spray a piece of plastic wrap with spray oil and cover the dough balls so they don't dry out.  Let the dough balls rise for about 1.5 or 2 hours, until they are well risen.  

Form the Pizzas

When you form the pizzas, begin flattening the dough ball in the middle of the disc, pressing down and out so as to move the air pockets from the middle of the dough ball to the edge, preserving the cornichon so that it will puff up dramatically when baked.  After you have formed the pizza, lightly salt the the dough, and brush the rim of the dough with olive oil. Then dress the pizza to your taste and bake.  In my oven (550 degrees convection) they take about 5-6 minutes to bake.

Enjoy!

« Last Edit: December 08, 2011, 01:24:44 PM by tinroofrusted »

buceriasdon

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2011, 09:21:27 AM »
just outstanding!
Don

parallei

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2011, 09:54:52 AM »
Wonderful! :chef:

The Brussels sprouts and guanciale looks killer.




Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2011, 10:00:41 AM »
Outstanding Crumb Tin!  Just beautiful.  Thanks for documenting your process with pics as well.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2011, 11:24:10 AM »
Looks great - and really looks a lot like a Mozza crust.

Nice work!

Craig
Pizza is not bread.

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2011, 11:42:40 AM »
Outstanding Crumb Tin!  Just beautiful.  Thanks for documenting your process with pics as well.

Well you know what they say about a recipe with no pics...

Thanks you guys for your nice comments.  I get great inspiration from you all. 

Regards,

TinRoof

Offline Jackitup

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2011, 12:25:56 PM »
LIKE>>>>>>
Jon
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Offline RobynB

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2011, 01:05:10 PM »
That looks wonderful!!  What kind of yeast did you use?  Thanks!

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2011, 01:22:09 PM »
That looks wonderful!!  What kind of yeast did you use?  Thanks!

Thanks. I use SAF Instant Yeast.  I buy it at Smart and Final (cash and carry store in California and elsewhere) for about $5 a pound. After about six months I throw out what's left and buy another pound so it stays fresh. 

Regards,

TinRoof

Offline norma427

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2011, 02:29:50 PM »
Tin Roof,

Your pizza pictures look wonderful!  Really nice crumb structure.  :)

Norma
« Last Edit: December 09, 2011, 07:00:13 AM by norma427 »
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Offline proxy

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2011, 01:35:02 AM »
That's awesome Tin Roof. Mouthwatering.

Did you add extra bread flour or all purpose? Maybe a typo in your updated recipe.

I'm trying to understand the effect of bread flour. If you used only bread flour, and completely skipped all purpose, how would your crust change?

Chewiness? Hardness of crisp? Flavor? Other characteristic?

Offline proxy

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2011, 11:30:20 AM »
It seems Mozza is getting a more radical crust spring. Also, they seem to get these tiny little bubbles on the  crust.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cathydanhphotography/4383584593/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cathydanhphotography/4383586323/lightbox/

is that because a 500-550F oven cannot generate enough scorching heat to cause such spring?

Next time I make pizza, I'm going to use your modified recipe.

One question, is it OK to bake two pizzas at once, on two pizza stones in the oven (would I need to a midpoint rotation?). My kitchenaid non-convection oven goes to 500F max

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2011, 11:42:21 AM »
That's awesome Tin Roof. Mouthwatering.

Did you add extra bread flour or all purpose? Maybe a typo in your updated recipe.

I'm trying to understand the effect of bread flour. If you used only bread flour, and completely skipped all purpose, how would your crust change?

Chewiness? Hardness of crisp? Flavor? Other characteristic?

Thanks Proxy.  I added extra AP flour to the final dough (not to to the sponge), because I didn't want to change the hydration level of the sponge. (The modified recipe calls for 15 oz AP flour vs. 13 oz in the final dough). I really don't think it matters much which one you increase.  In the original recipe Nancy Silverton recommends 26 oz of bread flour; one of my changes was making it half bread flour, half AP, in an effort to bring a bit more tenderness to the dough.  

In general, the more bread flour you use, the more crisp and chewy your crust will be. (Think of the difference between La Brea Bakery baguette (bread flour) vs. a loaf of basic sandwich bread (AP flour)).  The more AP flour you use, the lighter and less chewy your crust will be.  In my case since I am using King Arthur AP flour, which already has a pretty  high protein content as AP flours go, the difference is probably less pronounced than if I were using Gold Medal or one of the supermarket house brands of AP flour.  I find the crust to be plenty chewy with this recipe, so if I went in any direction it would probably be towards more AP flour and less bread flour. But I am pretty happy with it as it is.  

Maybe you will try making it with all bread flour and post your results?  

Regards,  

TinRoof

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #16 on: December 09, 2011, 11:56:07 AM »
It seems Mozza is getting a more radical crust spring. Also, they seem to get these tiny little bubbles on the  crust.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cathydanhphotography/4383584593/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cathydanhphotography/4383586323/lightbox/

is that because a 500-550F oven cannot generate enough scorching heat to cause such spring?

Next time I make pizza, I'm going to use your modified recipe.

One question, is it OK to bake two pizzas at once, on two pizza stones in the oven (would I need to a midpoint rotation?). My kitchenaid non-convection oven goes to 500F max

Yes, Mozza definitely gets a bigger oven spring. I could get some more spring if I would be a bit more careful with the crust edge and didn't spread the ingredients so far out on the pizza. When you see the guys at Mozza form the crust they are very careful to preserve the air pockets around the edge of the crust, so that leads to a puffier crust edge. 

The spots on the crust are maybe from a very mature dough I think.  If you left this dough in the refrigerator for a couple of days it might develop some of those spots.  Or it might be from the oven, but as I recall reading on this board, those tiny spots are air bubbles that come from dough maturity. Maybe Chau or someone will chime in on that issue. 

One of the nice things about this recipe is that it really is meant to be baked in a home oven. The ovens at Mozza are not set that high (maybe around 575 at the base and 650 in the dome). They leave most of their pizzas in the oven for at least 5 minutes. So a home oven really works out pretty well for this recipe. I set mine at 550 which is the max for me, and that seems to be about right.  I'm not saying I wouldn't try it a lot hotter if I could, but I really think that you want to bake this pizza around 550 or so.  You should get great results if your oven will hit 500.  Give it a good amount of time to preheat.

As for baking two pizzas at once, obviously you are going to have a bit of extra heat loss if you put two in at a time. You could do it, but I would not. Given that we are doing such low volume I think it is better to focus on giving each pizza individual attention versus trying to cook two at once.  If you do decide to do two at once, make sure you preheat for a long time (an hour or more) so your stones are as hot as possible. 

Regards,

TinRoof

parallei

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2011, 04:55:09 PM »
TinRoof,

Because your pies look so good I’m planning to try your Mozza recipe this weekend. I’ve taken the liberty of converting your latest version (Reply #3) to Bakers’ Percentages so I could do a couple of 12-inch pies.  I had to make the following assumptions:

•   Wheat Germ weighs 2 grams per teaspoon (I weighed some)
•   Starter weighs 14 grams per tablespoon (I weighed mine.  It is 50% flour and 50% water by weight)
•   Thickness factor is about 0.11.  I based this on the link you posted at the start of this thread.
•   I will use honey

Here is what I came up with for the Total Formula that includes everything:

Total Formula

Ingredient     Bakers' %
Flour                100
Water        78.6
IDY                0.1
Salt                2.1
Honey        1.3
Rye Flour        1.8
Wheat Germ    0.4
Starter        1.8

Sponge (included in Total Formula above)

68.2% of Water
46.4% of Wheat Flour
100% of Rye Flour
100% Wheat Germ
!00% IDY

Best,

Paul

PS

If anyone would like to do a reality check on my numbers, please do!


« Last Edit: December 09, 2011, 05:35:43 PM by parallei »

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2011, 08:13:38 PM »
Thanks so much for doing that. I have been meaning to try to do it, but never got around to it.  That will really be helpful to me in future batches. 

Offline proxy

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2011, 10:38:52 PM »
Great topic. I'm also making your recipe tomorrow.

I will just add a tsp of diastatic malt into the poolish, cuz I can't help experimenting a little bit.

One question, since this dough will make 6 pies, and my wife and I can only eat 3, what is the best way to freeze the dough (freeze at what stage?) and be able to bake the rest another time?

Btw, last time I froze Nancy's mozza dough for a week, then slowly thawed in the fridge, the dough came out "dead", pizza had zero spring, bad bad situation. I'm guessing the yeast died, or something? (at the same time I had some stored-bought frozen dough, which thawed and baked ok)