Author Topic: New and Improved Mozza Recipe  (Read 9577 times)

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Offline proxy

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #40 on: February 26, 2012, 05:46:52 PM »
I gave it another go today and it came out good again.

Tinroof, do you have any other pizza dough recipe that you consider to be superior to the mozza dough?


Offline Bende

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #41 on: September 22, 2012, 05:28:10 PM »
Tinroofrusted - thanks for the recipe.  I've got some healthy starter dough for the first time and I'm giving this recipe a shot.

Do you find that the dough is unusually wet throughout the folding process?  I've had this issue using the original Mozza recipe, and have found the wet dough difficult to work with.

Thanks,

Ben

Offline proxy

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #42 on: September 24, 2012, 10:41:45 AM »
baked another batch last weekend. Came out good, but couldn't get that super high cornice rise like my first attempt.

I have a question:

what happens when you add both 1 tsp instant yeast & 1-2 tbsp sour dough starer to the dough? How do these two yeasts interact with each other?

Tinroofrusted, have you experimented with any other improvements since you started this thread?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #43 on: September 24, 2012, 11:01:15 AM »
I have a question:

what happens when you add both 1 tsp instant yeast & 1-2 tbsp sour dough starer to the dough? How do these two yeasts interact with each other?


proxy,

In my experience, the commercial yeast will almost always overtake the sourdough starter, to the point where you may not even detect the effects of the starter, as I noted, for example, in Reply 11 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5515.msg46657/topicseen.html#msg46657. Also, Professor Raymond Calvel, in his book, The Taste of Bread, refers to a combination of starter and commercial yeast that he calls a "hybrid" preferment. As noted in Reply 11 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8011.msg69016/topicseen.html#msg69016, the amount of commercial yeast is kept small as not to overtake the preferment. If my experience is any guide, in your case, one teaspoon of IDY will completely overwhelm 1-2 tablespoons of sourdough starter.

Peter

Offline proxy

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #44 on: September 24, 2012, 12:01:23 PM »
Pete-zza,

and when IDY overtakes sourdough starter, what will the subsequent effect (or side-effects) be on the pizza crust?

I also wonder if the flavor of the sourdough starter is still a good idea for this pizza dough (I believe tin added sourdough starter to create some complexity in flavor). I have a hard time remembering the difference of the crust flavor with and without the sourdough starter.  Also, what would happen if I increased sourdough starter to 1 cup (with 1tsp of IDY)

I wish I could run a test kitchen and try out multiple variations and taste-test side by side, but for now have to settle with these hypothetical scenarios and your insights :)


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #45 on: September 24, 2012, 01:07:26 PM »
proxy,

The use of both a starter and commercial yeast is quite common. Jeff Varasano has described doing this, and I recall speaking with a baker at the Sullivan Street Bakery in NYC who told me that they used some commercial yeast along with their natural starter. I believe that it was a belt-and-suspenders type of thing to get more lift in the dough, or in case the natural starter didn't work as intended.

It's been a long time since I have used natural starters, either alone or with commercial yeast, but my recollection is that the doughs I made that had both forms of yeast produced finished crusts in which I could not detect the presence of the starter. However, we do have some members, like Chau, whom I believe uses both forms of yeast concurrently and who may be able to comment on their results. In your case, if you are using a full cup of starter material and that amount represents a large percent of the formula flour (e.g., around 30-40%), and if your starter is in good shape, you may not need any commercial yeast. According to Ed Wood, in his book, Classic Sourdoughs, one cup of starter culture weighs around 9 ounces. If you are using the original recipe that Tin Roof referenced, with 26 ounces of flour, the cup of starter culture would be about 35% of the total formula flour. If my memory is correct, that would be about the amount that Nancy Silverton recommends to make a basic country white bread in her book Breads from the La Brea Bakery (page 40). Having made that bread, with no commercial yeast, I can tell you that if your starter is in the proper condition, you should get a highly detectable sourdough flavor in the finished crust. However, that flavor is likely to be far more pronounced than a crust made using a much smaller amount of starter and a different fermentation protocol.

Sometimes you just have to conduct experiments to see what you get. Those experiments will be your best teacher.

Peter

Offline proxy

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Re: New and Improved Mozza Recipe
« Reply #46 on: November 03, 2012, 05:55:45 PM »
Peter,

thank you, you're a walking pizza encyclopedia.

With the rising popularity of baking steels (thx to Myhrvold), do you think this dough can benefit from it? or should it only be used with Neapolitan pizzas?