Author Topic: Steel Plate Attempt  (Read 11927 times)

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parallei

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #25 on: January 18, 2012, 10:16:57 PM »
Thanks for nice comments Don and Scott.

This style of pie has been turning out better for me lately (though I need to try some different toppings!).  Actually Scott, I think they are getting better because of three things.  These include two items that you've always been a proponent of; the steel plate and minimal kneading prior to the cold fermentation. The third is John's (fazzari's) bulk then gentle re-ball late in the game.  I do think this produces a superior crumb and a more tender pie, at least for me.

Still liking the KABF though!  >:D

As an aside, the other week I visited a mill north of Denver and purchased 50 lbs. of their Boulder Organic Hi-Gluten flour.  I haven't tried it yet.  Chris (WestCounrty) ended up with 10 lbs of it and say's it acts pretty much like KASL.


Offline hockman4357

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #26 on: January 20, 2012, 03:45:19 PM »
I have been contemplating giving a 16" x 16" x 1/2" A36 steel plate a try.  Still haven't decided for sure whether I want to go with the steel plate of a 1" cordierite kiln shelf (same size).  My local steel outlet just offered to cut me a piece of steel and to let me try cooking the pizza on it.  He said that if it worked out, he would accept a pizza for payment.  If not, he said to just bring it back without a charge.  No doubt an admirable offer, but I don't trust my expertise at this time since I am very new to this art.

My Jenn Air oven heats up to 550 degrees.  Is my understanding correct that you preheat the oven with the steel plate located on the top rack closest to the broiler for about an hour, slip the pizza on letting it cook for a couple of minutes and then turn on broiler for approximately 3-4 minutes to finish it up.  Turning on the broiler turns off the bake function, but my assumption is that the plate is so hot that the pizza continues to cook.

Am I wrapping my brain aroung this correctly?

scott123

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2012, 04:11:01 PM »
Hockman, that's pretty much the right idea.  You might be able to go with the second rack from the top if your broiler is strong enough- and, ideally, you should shoot for 2 minutes without the broiler and 2 minutes with, for a total bake time of 4 minutes.

It's also a good idea to pre-heat the oven to 525.  If you pre-heat it to the top temp, the broiler might not stay on for long, since that, too, is usually controlled by the 550 thermostat.

An infrared thermometer helps, but isn't absolutely essential.

It'll take a few attempts to dial in the right temperature for the plate.

Lastly, if your oven can accommodate a larger plate, get it- even if it's just 16.5 x 16.5.  Ultimately, you're going to want to make 16" pizzas and launching a 16" pizza on a 16" plate is very difficult. The bigger the better.  As long as the oven door closes, you're fine.

Offline hockman4357

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #28 on: January 27, 2012, 03:14:43 PM »
Well, I am going to pick up my steel plate today or Monday.  The largest plate that will fit in my oven is 16" x 16" so I had to settle for that size.  If the steel is dirty or has some scaling, what should I do to clean it.  I was thinking that maybe sanding it would be the way to go, but I wasn't sure what grade of sandpaper to use.  Also, is there anything that I need to do to season it after it is clean prior to cooking my first pizza on it?

One more thing, is there a particular New York pizza recipe that you have found that works especially well with this method of cooking?  I am anxious to get started!

A special thanks goes out to scott123 for steering me in the right direction!

parallei

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #29 on: January 27, 2012, 05:20:31 PM »
hockman,

When i got mine, I just gave it a few good scrubs with dish soap and hot water 'till a no more crap seemed to be coming off it onto a white paper towel. The into the oven to dry.  No sandpaper was needed, was pretty smooth.  I haven't seasoned mine, but then it is pretty dry here in Denver.  Mine just sits in the oven between uses.  I wash it before use (just hot water and a brush), dry it mostly off, and back into the oven while it is preheating.  Others may do different.....

I thought the dough and method I posted above in Reply #22 worked well.  You could give it a try.

scott123

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #30 on: January 27, 2012, 07:43:05 PM »
Hockman, like Paul said, it should be pretty smooth and shouldn't require seasoning. If it does turn out to be a bit crusty, then sand it with a coarse grit to pull off the crusty bits, then a fine grit to smooth out the lines from the coarse sanding. I do the same when cheese gets stuck on my soapstone- coarse sanding, then fine, then a damp paper towel to take off the dust. If I don't spill any cheese, then it's just a damp paper towel between bakes.

Paul's recipe is similar to mine, except I use bromated flour  >:D

parallei

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2012, 10:12:22 PM »
Norma and Chau's recent posts concerning NY style pies inspire me to keep trying with the steel plate.  These were pretty tasty.........

KABF again.  Scott, I actually spent the better part of a morning cursing around to every type/ethnic grocery store I could think of and no luck trying to track down a bromated flour here in Denver.

Online norma427

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #32 on: February 06, 2012, 06:00:01 AM »
Paul,

Your NY style pies look fantastic!  :) Your crumb also looks very tender and open.

Nice job!

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

buceriasdon

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #33 on: February 06, 2012, 07:00:08 AM »
Wow Paul, That's unbromated? Outstanding!
Don


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #34 on: February 06, 2012, 10:29:04 AM »
Paul - Outstanding. Good 'ol KABF - I used it in high percentages for some sicilian stuff recently and it always performs beautifully when you need higher protein.

John

Offline chickenparm

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #35 on: February 06, 2012, 10:49:47 PM »
Excellent pies! I got hungry looking at those!
 8)
-Bill

parallei

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #36 on: February 06, 2012, 11:37:31 PM »
Thanks folks.  ;D

I think the combination on minimal kneading and fazzari's late in the game balling is the ticket, for me, for now.

Best

Offline hockman4357

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #37 on: February 07, 2012, 09:43:58 AM »
Gave the steel plate another try tonight.  One of the better "in the home oven" pies I've made.  Nothing special:

Flour - 100% (KABF)
Water - 64%
IDY - 0.5%
Salt - 2.0%
Olive Oil - 2.5%
Sugar - 1.5%

Dissolve salt and sugar in water.  Add flour and IDY.  Stir together with Danish Dough Whisk. Let rest 5 min.  Add oil, squish in with hands.  Let rest 5 min.  Minimal kneading (five or six slap on the counter type kneads, one or two regular with the heel of the hand kneads).  Into the fridge bulk for 18 hours.  Out of the fridge for one hour, divide and gently re-ball.  Back to the fridge for two hours, then out of the fridge for two hours.  Oven preheated to 550F for 75 min with steel plate about 4-inches below broiler (electric).  4:30 min bake with broiler on for about 2:00 min.

This may well be a stupid question, but how do I convert this recipe into simple weights and/or volumes?  I want to give it a try this weekend.  Man, the pizza that you are making looks amazing!!!

parallei

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #38 on: February 07, 2012, 10:17:27 AM »
hockman4357,

The easiest way to do it yourself is to use the Expanded Dough Calculator Tool here:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html

But first read:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5025.msg42542.html#msg42542

Post if questions.......

Thickness Factor (TF) used was 0.08....

« Last Edit: February 07, 2012, 10:30:21 AM by parallei »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #39 on: February 07, 2012, 10:24:04 AM »
Paul,

For hockman4357 to be able to use the expanded dough calculating tool to make pizzas like yours, he will have to know either the dough ball weight or a thickness factor and pizza size. I did not see that information specified in the post where you set forth the baker's percents. 

Peter


Offline hockman4357

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #41 on: February 07, 2012, 05:43:40 PM »
Thanks for all the suggestions and advise!  When making a 16" New York style pizza, would the ball weight be best at 18oz or 20oz?  I am really starting to get into this!


parallei

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #42 on: February 07, 2012, 06:01:43 PM »
Well, the area of a 16-inch pizza is 201 in2.

Since you know the TF = the dough weight in oz divided by the pizza area in in2:

TF for 18 oz = 18/201 = 0.089 say 0.09

Tf for 20 oz = 20/201 = 0.099 say 0.10

I'd go with the 0.09 or better yet 0.08.  But is up to you.......

For TF = 0.08; x oz/201in2 = 0.08, so x oz = 16 oz of dough.

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #43 on: February 07, 2012, 07:21:57 PM »
I always work in dough ball weight, but just converted that to thickness factor and found I've been using 0.078 for my New york style pies on the steel plate and I'm very happy with the results. 
-Jeff

Offline hockman4357

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #44 on: February 08, 2012, 11:15:05 AM »
I'm about ready to launch on Paul's dough recipe.  Is there an alternative to the Danish Dough Whisk?  Where is a good place to buy one and what size works best?
« Last Edit: February 08, 2012, 11:41:26 AM by hockman4357 »

parallei

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2012, 11:35:22 AM »
Quote
Is there an alternative to the Danish Dough Whisk?

Your hands.  You could do it in a stand mixer too.  Just don't over knead. Anything will work.  I just happen to like the Danish Dough Whisk or my hands and don't use a mixer too often these days.

Quote
Where is a good place to buy one and what size works best?

The King Arthur Catalog or web site.  Mine is about 15-inhes long.  Eleven of those inches are the handle.  I don't know if it is the best, but it works for the smaller batches I do.

Good luck!

Offline hockman4357

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #46 on: February 08, 2012, 12:24:09 PM »
I think I'll order a Danish Dough Whisk.  In the meantime, I'll probably use my KitchenAid Stand Up Mixer.  I'm thinking that the Flat Beater attachment is more like the Danish Dough Whisk than the Dough Hook attachment.  Do you concur?

parallei

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #47 on: February 08, 2012, 06:21:51 PM »
Quote
I'm thinking that the Flat Beater attachment is more like the Danish Dough Whisk than the Dough Hook attachment.  Do you concur?

Yep.

Offline hockman4357

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #48 on: February 10, 2012, 10:38:05 AM »
Put together a batch of dough last night.  It was the first time that I actually weighed out the ingredients.  Are ya'll weighing out the water for the dough recipes?  The calculator called for 390.91 g (64% hydration) of water but my digital scale required way more water than necessary to reach 390.91 g.  Just wondering if water is usually done in volume rather than weight.  If not, maybe I'm just using my digital scale incorrectly.

parallei

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Re: Steel Plate Attempt
« Reply #49 on: February 10, 2012, 10:22:37 PM »
Yes, weigh the water that's what the weights are for........


Quote
but my digital scale required way more water than necessary to reach 390.91 g.

Not sure what you mean.....391 grams is about 14 oz (weight) of water, a cup of water (8 oz volume) weighs 8.3454 oz.  So did you add about 14/8.345 or 1.7 cups water (volume)?  Thats between 1 and 1 3/4 cups?  I'd trust the scale unless you have reason to doubt it.  Then again, maybe you just messed something up like we all do on occasion.  
« Last Edit: February 10, 2012, 10:30:19 PM by parallei »


 

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