Author Topic: Hobart 30 110 volt draw back  (Read 1201 times)

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Offline sarduyjorge

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Hobart 30 110 volt draw back
« on: December 05, 2011, 04:21:21 PM »
What would be the draw back in purchasing a Hobart 30 qt 110 v instead of a 220 current

Would it be pushing the machine to the limit everytime a I pack 25 lb of flour in the bowl


Offline Hdale85

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Re: Hobart 30 110 volt draw back
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2011, 04:26:04 PM »
Only difference there should be between 110v and 220v is the amount of current it draws from your houses main power panel. A 110V mixer will draw twice the current it would on a 220V circuit.

Offline sarduyjorge

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Re: Hobart 30 110 volt draw back
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2011, 09:10:02 AM »
so as far as durability the 110 should hold out well in making pizza dough; I know they are made for it but wanted to know if 220 has a better motor?
I have just offered a Hobart 30qt 110 v. for $1,000 and a Hobart 80qt 110 v for $2,000, what should I watch out for; besides that it should turn on and run

thanks
« Last Edit: December 23, 2011, 09:53:08 AM by sarduyjorge »

Offline apizza

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Re: Hobart 30 110 volt draw back
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2011, 01:51:06 PM »
Many times the motor is the same. The internal connections will change depending on voltage selection.
Marty

Offline vwbpizza

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Re: Hobart 30 110 volt draw back
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2011, 09:12:35 PM »
Exactly what Marty said. No real practical difference in a motor that size.
I might still be learning "pizza" but electronics are another matter. :)
« Last Edit: December 23, 2011, 09:14:43 PM by vwbpizza »

Offline JConk007

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Re: Hobart 30 110 volt draw back
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2011, 10:07:56 PM »
wow a 30qt for $1000 is a great deal be sure its not some junker just painted over find out the year and history on this macine from where? how often used .... deals are out there but still be leary at that price.
I have a 20qt Hobart that is older but works if anybondy has interest just send me a PM My new dream mixer has arrived and I want this out!
John
I Love to Flirt with Fire! www.flirtingwithfirepizza.com

Offline Sartanely

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Re: Hobart 30 110 volt draw back
« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2011, 09:18:24 AM »
What is your dream mixer if not secret? I returned the Bosch universal plus resently because I did no like it. Niw I am looking for perfect mixer for home use and thinking to get Hobart n50 or c100  I agree with you. There are many reprinted junkies, I prefer to spend more up front and buy a new unit rather than buy used and spand more money and time on it unless if you are lucky ad find really honest seller.

Offline breadman_nz

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Re: Hobart 30 110 volt draw back
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2011, 04:47:13 PM »
What is your dream mixer if not secret? I returned the Bosch universal plus resently because I did no like it. Niw I am looking for perfect mixer for home use and thinking to get Hobart n50 or c100  I agree with you. There are many reprinted junkies, I prefer to spend more up front and buy a new unit rather than buy used and spand more money and time on it unless if you are lucky ad find really honest seller.

For a home mixer, the N50 is great (I have one I restored). It's heavy, expensive and built like the proverbial brick outhouse. If you need larger capacities than about 1-1.5kg dough batches, you might want to move up to a 10, 12 or even 20 quart model. The larger mixers aren't so adept at smaller batches though, so you do need to consider how much you will usually be making.

For just mixing dough, there's general consensus that spiral mixers are better - but at the expense of the versatility of planetary mixers. Diving arm and other more exotic types are also great for dough, but little else (and are harder to find in home-sized capacities).
« Last Edit: December 24, 2011, 04:49:26 PM by breadman_nz »


 

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