Author Topic: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough  (Read 26470 times)

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Offline fazzari

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the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« on: December 14, 2011, 01:03:33 AM »
I am simply amazed at how differing treatments to the same dough can yield such different results in the final product...and so I'm devising a test to see if I can find what factors matter the most.
I started by mixing 520 ounces of dough using the following formula:

High gluten flour      100.00%
water                      58.00
salt                          2.00
yeast                        .50
sugar                       2.00
oil                           3.00

Since I knew I wanted to bulk ferment most of the dough, I used a water temperature to yield a 70 degree dough after mixed.
Immediately after mixing I scaled, balled and refrigerated 5 13-ounce doughballs.
The rest of the dough was placed in a 5 gallon bucket and refrigerated.

After 12 hours, I scaled, balled and refrigerated another 5 13-ounce doughballs

AFter 12 hours, I scaled, balled and refrigerated 4 13-ounce doughballs

I will continue this process, so that I can compare doughs in a 4 day window of time

First bake is 24 hours after the initial mixing of the dough.  The first pizza is a dough which was scaled, balled and refrigerated right after mixing..and sat 24 hours in the fridge.  The second dough was bulk fermented 12 hours, was then scaled, balled and then refrigerated another 12 hours.
The first dough is very typical of any pizza of this style....it is chewy, soft, and floppy...and tastes very good.  The second pizza is like biting into a cloud....it is crisp, with a very thin bottom crust, tender, light and delicious.  Even bulk fermenting a dough for 12 short hours, yield amazing results.

More comparisons tomorrow

John


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2011, 01:52:11 AM »
Cool John.  Looking forward to reading about your results.  :chef:

Chau

Offline norma427

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2011, 08:57:02 AM »
John,

Very interesting results so far!  :)

Norma
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Online TXCraig1

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2011, 09:53:06 AM »
John, I'm also excited to see your results.

Would it make sense to use the exact same toppings at each stage and measure them by weight before adding so that you can eliminate them as a variable? I think it is reasonable to assume that the toppings can and will effect the characteristics of the baked crust.

CL
Pizza is not bread.

Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2011, 08:41:54 PM »
John, I'm also excited to see your results.

Would it make sense to use the exact same toppings at each stage and measure them by weight before adding so that you can eliminate them as a variable? I think it is reasonable to assume that the toppings can and will effect the characteristics of the baked crust.

CL

Excellent idea....I was being selfish thinking I would have to at least taste each one!!!  So, after the following results, I will make simple cheese pizzas.
John

Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2011, 08:45:06 PM »
So, here are the results from the second bake.  I almost blew this one in that I let the doughs warm up a little too long, but it all worked out ok.

The first pizza was made from a dough which was scaled, balled and refrigerated out of the mixer and was refrigerated for 36 hours.


Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2011, 08:46:47 PM »
The next pizza was made from a dough which was bulk fermented 12 hours, then scaled, balled and refrigerated another 24 hours.

Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2011, 08:48:21 PM »
The last one was made from a dough which was bulk fermented 24 hours, then scaled, balled and refrigerated another 12 hours.

Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2011, 08:58:45 PM »
In the above stage, both of the bulk fermented doughs are crisp, tender, and light...they are very, very similar and I would have a hard time picking the best.  The dough which was balled out of the mixer, was also very good given the extra time in the fridge....but, it is soft, and a bit chewy.. very enjoyable just the same.  
So far, I've been scaling and balling bulk fermented dough for 2 days now, and have not encountered any major problems as far as making a smooth dough ball goes.  I'm sure the hydration of the dough has much to do with  this as well as the softening up (which Chau explains) that the bulk fermentation causes.  I'm not saying one could take a dough in each hand and ball them both quickly as can be done right out of the mixer...what I'm saying is if there is a trade off of a little speed for a great textured pizza..I'll take the time to make it as good as I can, especially at home.

John

Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2011, 01:19:03 AM »
Here is the next stage of experimentation:
This pizza was made from a dough ball which was scaled, balled and refrigerated 48 hours right out of the mixer.


Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2011, 01:20:36 AM »
The next one was bulk fermented 12 hours, then scaled, balled and refrigerated for 36 hours.


Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2011, 01:22:08 AM »
The next one was bulk fermented 24 hours, then scaled, balled and refrigerated another 24 hours.


Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2011, 01:23:37 AM »
The last on was bulk fermented 36 hours, then scaled, balled and refrigerated for 12 hours


Online TXCraig1

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #13 on: December 15, 2011, 02:56:59 PM »
If you're looking for an experiment when you finish this one, I'd be curious to know if you find any differences in two identical doughs with the same fermentation time except one is a combination of bulk and ball fermentation and the other is only fermented in balls.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #14 on: December 15, 2011, 03:30:39 PM »
If you're looking for an experiment when you finish this one, I'd be curious to know if you find any differences in two identical doughs with the same fermentation time except one is a combination of bulk and ball fermentation and the other is only fermented in balls.

If I'm understanding your suggestion, I think I'm already doing that in that in each batch of bakings, there is always 1 dough ball which was balled out of the mixer.  It is the very first pizza baked in each stage of the experiment.

John

Online TXCraig1

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2011, 05:10:19 PM »
Sounds like it. Have you noticed any difference between the pies, with the same fermentation tim,e that had a bulk fermentation and those that did not?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #16 on: December 15, 2011, 07:02:51 PM »
Up until this point, I can honestly say that each and every bulk fermented dough was better than the dough balled at mix time.  But, now at the 60 hour mark, there are changes.  First of all, the dough ball made from bulk fermented dough, scaled balled and refrigerated after 12 hours and then refrigerated for 48 hours, is now just about the same in texture as the balled at mix time dough.  The dough which was balled at the 24 hours mark is just slightly better than the control ball.  The other 2 are still markedly better.

Here is the control ball (balled after mixing...refrigerated 60 hours.


Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2011, 07:05:25 PM »
Here is the dough balled after 12 hours, refrigerated 48 hours.  The texture of this dough is about the same as the dough balled after mixing.  So, to me there was no advantage to bulk fermenting if you wait this long to bake it.


Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #18 on: December 15, 2011, 07:07:33 PM »
Here is the pizza made from dough balled after 24 hours and refrigerated another 36 hours.  It still has crispness, but nothing like doughs cooked sooner after balling.

Offline fazzari

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #19 on: December 15, 2011, 07:09:39 PM »
Here is the pizza made from dough balled 36 hours after mixing and refrigerated 24 hours.  Still, crisp, light and tender.