Author Topic: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough  (Read 29641 times)

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scott123

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #225 on: October 15, 2012, 08:44:28 AM »
Steve, re-balls develop a considerable amount of gluten.  100% AT dough has a load of gluten potential.  If you re-ball a dough with that much protein in it, it's could easily be tough to form, even with 8 hours. AT (and Kyrol and KASL) really wants to make gluten. That's what it was put on this earth to do. Look at it sideways and gluten starts forming :)  If you don't want to end up with a difficult form or a tough crust, for a cold fermented dough, you have to treat it with kid gloves by severely underkneading it and giving it plenty of time after the reball.  This is why lower protein flours (such as Full Strength or Spring King) or AT/AP blends are so much easier to work with. You don't have to tiptoe around them for fear of creating too much gluten.


Offline slybarman

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #226 on: October 15, 2012, 09:29:05 AM »
Steve, re-balls develop a considerable amount of gluten.  100% AT dough has a load of gluten potential.  If you re-ball a dough with that much protein in it, it's could easily be tough to form, even with 8 hours. AT (and Kyrol and KASL) really wants to make gluten. That's what it was put on this earth to do. Look at it sideways and gluten starts forming :)  If you don't want to end up with a difficult form or a tough crust, for a cold fermented dough, you have to treat it with kid gloves by severely underkneading it and giving it plenty of time after the reball.  This is why lower protein flours (such as Full Strength or Spring King) or AT/AP blends are so much easier to work with. You don't have to tiptoe around them for fear of creating too much gluten.

Scott:

I got a good laugh at your visual of a ticking gluten bomb just waiting for an excuse to explode.

I am not sure if what I did was technically a "re-ball" since I did not ball it after mixing. I balled it only once 8 hrs before baking. I did under-knead as we have been discussing in the other thread.

I have about 15 more lbs of AT to go through and then I can consider a lower protein flour for next time. :)

scott123

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #227 on: October 15, 2012, 09:44:36 AM »
Steve, remember, you can blend it.  66 AT/33 AP works nicely.

How aggressively are you balling, btw?  You should turn the dough over itself maybe 2-3 times max.

Offline slybarman

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #228 on: October 15, 2012, 09:46:18 AM »
I am probably doing double that, but will try less next time.

Offline slybarman

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #229 on: October 16, 2012, 10:35:58 AM »
Steve, remember, you can blend it.  66 AT/33 AP works nicely.

How aggressively are you balling, btw?  You should turn the dough over itself maybe 2-3 times max.

Does the blend warrant slightly higher hydration than straight AT?

scott123

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #230 on: October 16, 2012, 03:35:41 PM »
Steve, lower protein requires less water, but, in this instance, 60% hydration is perfectly fine for the blend.

Offline slybarman

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #231 on: October 16, 2012, 03:40:38 PM »
Scott:

Thanks as always for being generous with your time and knowledge.

scott123

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Re: the effects of bulk fermentation on a basic dough
« Reply #232 on: October 16, 2012, 07:47:00 PM »
You're welcome, Steve  :)