Author Topic: Blue Bay LBE - in Baltimore MD  (Read 11118 times)

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Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Blue Bay LBE - in Baltimore MD
« Reply #50 on: June 17, 2013, 08:31:25 AM »
I have to confess I haven't used the LBE in some time.  To my horror, upon opening it up, I found the bottom ashcatcher, which holds the burner, to be full of rusty scale. There was a mound of rust and debris atop the burner as well.  I cleaned it out as best I could, given that all the bolts have rusted together, and there is no way to disassemble the burner itself.  When I connected it and gave it some gas and tied to light it, no joy, and the propane was visibly coming out of the venturi.

Anyone have any ideas?  I'm sure it's a clog, but am somewhat leery of sticking pointy things into it. 
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.


Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Blue Bay LBE - in Baltimore MD
« Reply #51 on: July 01, 2013, 09:24:23 AM »
Yep, it was a clog.  Mud-dauber wasps had filled up the central burner passage with their nests, eggs and larvae.  A friend at work helped me get the rusted bolt holding the central ring that looks like a cogwheel.  Some penetrating spray and rubber mallet whacking later, it all came apart.  Then after some bottle-brush time and lots of Eeeww later, the burner was finally clean inside and out.

   Made pizza for a Supermoon party across the street.  Small party, 4 adults and 2 kids... only made 4 pizzas, no pics.  A shame because the host went out and bought really great toppings:  all the toppings needed to make the classics.  Margherita, L'Atomica, Bianco, etc.   It was good to get back into slinging pies after a long interruption. 
   Got reminded of a few pertinent factors:  1. humidity adversely affects dough opening, so choose a lightly fermented low-hydration recipe if expecting moist environmental conditions.  2. Conductivity of almost any stone you can put into an LBE is going to be higher by a factor of .33 than the firebrick in a wood-fired masonry oven, so adjust your cooking temperature to 2/3 of "ideal" WFO.  For my stone, a top surface (average) stone temp of 550 is perfect. Any more than that, I'd better be using Caputo.
   Pizzas made that night were: all-cheese for the kids (@550): very nice!  Pepperoni, portabellas and hot peppers @ 650 (charred, but tasted good) Sicilian in a cast iron skillet @ 525 for 6 minutes: ham + pepperoni, shiitakes, fontina & mozz, drizzled olive oil  (belly-bustin addictively tasty) and then made a last Sicilian with just cheese and garlic to leave for next-day leftovers.
 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2013, 10:43:04 AM by pizzaneer »
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Blue Bay LBE - in Baltimore MD
« Reply #52 on: July 01, 2013, 09:41:30 AM »
Meet the BBE (Blue Bay Egg) again. The name has been updated in the interests of added coolness.  It shall now be known as .... "Dragon's Egg".     :P ;D

If you look closely, you will note the internal parts of the LBE setup are now on the exterior in storage position. 

That is because it is, for now, set up as a charcoal grill.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Blue Bay LBE - in Baltimore MD
« Reply #53 on: July 01, 2013, 09:42:56 AM »
There's a load of good charcoal going in a steel box, the huge hole in the bottom of the Egg is blocked by a round foil pan, and there's a drip pan under a lovely little ham.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Blue Bay LBE - in Baltimore MD
« Reply #54 on: July 01, 2013, 09:55:02 AM »
A ham that's been slowly absorbing a mixture of wildflower honey and steakhouse spices.  For days, sealed in a glass bowl in the fridge.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Blue Bay LBE - in Baltimore MD
« Reply #55 on: July 01, 2013, 09:55:54 AM »
Crust and char.  The two major factors to making a perfect pit ham.   The crust is a product of the liquid layer surrounding the meat coming in contact with sustained dry heat.  Your basic chemistry rules apply. Remember that the carmelization rate of sugar is tempered by addition of fat, which is another way of saying that you are basically looking at a GIANT HUNK OF BACON.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Blue Bay LBE - in Baltimore MD
« Reply #56 on: July 01, 2013, 09:57:34 AM »
Now let's talk about char.  Using the little magnifier thingy in your browser, zoom right in.  Take a look at the strata revealed in the edge of the top cut.  From the outside going in, the range is from "BLACKENED BACON, through GUMMY COATING, to SMOKED HAM". 
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Blue Bay LBE - in Baltimore MD
« Reply #57 on: July 01, 2013, 10:02:08 AM »
And here we see the product of the grilling process, after 3 hours of slow cooking and then a nice soaking bath in my homemade barbecue sauce.

Now that the char is wet, it won't powder off or make your mouth feel like you are gnawing on a charcoal briquette.  Even under the layer of sauce, it has a little crisp to it- as much as blackened bacon does.  In comparison, the center of the slice is meltingly tender.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.


 

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