Author Topic: Not Using Delayed Fermentation  (Read 884 times)

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Offline CarsonCarnes

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Not Using Delayed Fermentation
« on: December 19, 2011, 10:29:28 PM »
Hello all.  I love the dough calculator and all of the information on this site.  Thank you all for that.  I am interested in making a pie without delayed fermentation.  Ideally I'd like to make the dough, kneed it, let is rise once (for approximately an hour), and then stretch out the dough by hand.  I'm gunna use approximately 200 grams of flour and a hydration level of 70%.  Am I crazy to use a teaspoon of IDY?  Is that really too much?  Or do folks using the delayed fermentation simply use less because it has time to work?  Thoughts please.

Cheers - Carson

P.S.  I'm upping my hydration level from 65% to 70% to try to get some big fluffy bubbles in my crust.


Offline patnx2

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Re: Not Using Delayed Fermentation
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2011, 03:52:12 AM »
Check out Steve's quick and easy pizza. I think he uses three quarters teaspoon yeast for a 2 hour pie. Patrick
Patrick

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Not Using Delayed Fermentation
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2011, 04:20:43 AM »
Check out Steve's quick and easy pizza. I think he uses three quarters teaspoon yeast for a 2 hour pie. Patrick

I've used that recipe as much as any, very good
Jon
Save A Cow, Eat A Vegan....Totally Organic And Hormone Free!!

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Not Using Delayed Fermentation
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2011, 06:45:27 AM »
CarsonCarnes,

Asking for a one-hour "emergency"dough is a tall order. To accomplish that, you will need to use a lot more yeast than normal and water that is warm enough (without harming the yeast) to produce a finished dough temperature that is also above normal. You might check out the compilation of emergency dough recipes at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8297.0.html. Most of those recipes require more than an hour to make and use the dough but there are a few that come fairly close.

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Not Using Delayed Fermentation
« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2011, 09:03:08 AM »
We have done a huge amount of work on short time doughs, including emergency doughs, if at all possible, incorporate at least 2.5 hours of fermentation time into your dough making process. This will significantly improve the crust flavor as well as reducing the bubbling and blistering of the dough during baking. Ain't nothin' that speaks of a great pizza like a huge bubble on the pizza during baking that causes the cheese and toppings to slide off and burn in the oven.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


 

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