Author Topic: Artisan-inspired pizza  (Read 4709 times)

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2012, 12:17:35 PM »
Congratulations on the weight loss. Pies look very good as always. It's the same pies in both sets of pictures isn't it?

Craig,

Thanks. You're right, those are the same pics. I messed them up. Here are the ones for the revised second formula...

I'll post the details on mixing and fermentation later on tonight.

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2012, 12:18:21 PM »
Norma & Para,

Thanks guys. The weight loss was necessary :)
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline randyjohnsonhve

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #22 on: May 25, 2012, 04:06:30 PM »

Beautiful Pies!  I noticed that your recent formula used a preferment...was it a true poolish with ADY?  Also, I am interested in your times of mixing, fermenting, etc...

What difference did the preferment make to your original formula in January?

What did of oven are you using, and what are the times there?

Congrats of the weight loss and I look forward to hearing your replies...

RJelli :chef:
"Pizza Evolves...Our Best Pizza Ever is Not Today." It is 'what' is right, not 'who' is right that matters.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #23 on: May 25, 2012, 11:13:46 PM »
Beautiful Pies!  I noticed that your recent formula used a preferment...was it a true poolish with ADY?  Also, I am interested in your times of mixing, fermenting, etc...

What difference did the preferment make to your original formula in January?

What did of oven are you using, and what are the times there?

Congrats of the weight loss and I look forward to hearing your replies...

RJelli :chef:

RJelli,

Thanks.

To answer your questions:

I used 45% of the total ADY in the poolish of each formula. The poolish of the first one was fermented for 12 hrs, the second one for 24 hrs, both at room temp.

The poolish, especially the 24 hr one added a bunch more flavor to the crust. For the oven I used my home oven and a stone, lowest rack and heated to 630F. The bake time was about 7 minutes. I didn't really time it but rather pulled it when it was visually okay to me.

Now for the mixing process...

I added the flour to the poolish, then the sugar, the rest of the yeast, gave it a couple of spins, added the salt and then the oil. I mixed it until it all came together and then let it rest for about 30 mins in the bowl. Then I let the mixer knead it for 8 minutes on Speed 2.

Poured it onto a lightly dusted counter, gave it a few manual kneads, shaped it into a ball and gave it a bench rest of another 30 minutes, covered with plastic wrap. Removed the wrap, dusted it lightly again, gave it some quick kneads, shaped it into a ball again and placed it into an oiled bowl, brushed the dough with some oil, covered it and gave it a 24 hr cold ferment.

That sums it all up, basically.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2012, 11:15:34 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

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http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #24 on: May 26, 2012, 03:09:29 PM »
Working with a Biga right now.

I mixed it together last night and will give it a 24 hr fermentation. The pics are from last night (Page1) and from this morning, after 12 hours (Page2). It's coming along nicely and the smell is great, very yeasty...

The formula for the Biga:

134 gr. Power flour (100%)
81 gr. Water (60%)
0.34 gr. ADY (0.274%)

There's an artisan pizza shop in Palo Alto that uses Bigas in their dough formula and the pies are just stellar.  The photo of the pizza below is what I'm shooting for.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2012, 04:27:19 PM »
Last night, after a 24 hr fermentation of the Biga, I incorporated it into the final dough formula using my stand mixer.

I used water at an 80F temperature, added the Biga, the flour, the sugar and the rest of the ADY. I gave it a spin of one minute just to roughly mix everything up, added the salt and mixed for another two minutes until no raw flour was visible. I then let the dough rest for 30 minutes before adding the oil so that the flour had a chance to absorb the water.

The dough was then kneaded on Speed 2 for 5 minutes. Since I used the Power HG flour I didn't really wanted to overknead everything. I poured it onto the counter, shaped it into a ball and gave it a bench rest of 20 minutes before placing it in a bowl for the overnight 12 hr ferment.

This morning I divided the dough into two 430 gr. balls, oiled them up and back into the fridge they went for another 12 hrs, until 7pm tonight.

I think this was possibly the airiest dough I have ever made. I couldn't believe the large voids on the bottom of the dough.

Here's the dough formula...

Flour (100%):
Water (65%):
ADY (.3%):
Salt (1.75%):
Oil (1.5%):
Sugar (3%):
Total (171.55%):
Single Ball:
501.31 g  |  17.68 oz | 1.11 lbs
325.85 g  |  11.49 oz | 0.72 lbs
1.5 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.4 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
8.77 g | 0.31 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.57 tsp | 0.52 tbsp
7.52 g | 0.27 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.67 tsp | 0.56 tbsp
15.04 g | 0.53 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.77 tsp | 1.26 tbsp
860 g | 30.34 oz | 1.9 lbs | TF = N/A
430 g | 15.17 oz | 0.95 lbs

From this I calculated the Biga amount of 25% of the total dough weight and subtracted the amounts from the formula above. I did this manually instead of using the PF calculator.

The Biga numbers are posted my previous post and the numbers (rounded up or down) for the final dough are

Flour    372 grams
Water  239 grams
Salt          9 grams
ADY     1.16 grams
Biga     215 grams
Oil          7.5 grams
Sugar     15 grams


I post the outcome a bit later...some pics.

Mike

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http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Riprazor

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #26 on: June 06, 2012, 05:19:53 PM »
Essen, can you post some specifics about the temps and cooking environment?  If I follow the post you are using a stone and not a metal cooking surface?  How long and what temperature?

Thanks,
Barry

Offline deb415611

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #27 on: June 06, 2012, 05:41:36 PM »
Essen,

Great pizzas, love that last one.  Are you liking the biga version better than the Poolish?

Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #28 on: June 20, 2012, 06:42:02 PM »
Essen, can you post some specifics about the temps and cooking environment?  If I follow the post you are using a stone and not a metal cooking surface?  How long and what temperature?

Thanks,
Barry

Barry,

I have to apologize for the long delay in replying to you.

The bake temp was around 627F (have a pic somewhere that I could post) and the time was around 7 minutes on a stone, set on the lowest rack.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #29 on: June 20, 2012, 06:43:20 PM »
Essen,

Great pizzas, love that last one.  Are you liking the biga version better than the Poolish?

Thanks Deb.

I'm not sure yet about those two. The Biga created a lighter dough structure, imho, compared to the poolish. I'd have to test this a little more to be certain, though.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #30 on: June 06, 2013, 05:29:28 PM »
I started to tinker around with some dough formula over the weekend after I recently saw a photo of Ken's Artisan Pizza in Portland.

Unfortunately, I have never had them before but if the reviews on Yelp and Urbanspoon are any indication, the pizza must be dynamite. The only thing I had to go by was the looks of their pies. I couldn't get the exact browning of the outer crust since I don't have a WFO but perhaps a longer fermentation time would help. This one only spent 24 hours in the fridge...

I'll post the numbers a bit later since I don't have them handy right now.

First pic is Ken's used as an inspiration. However, I think I went a little too heavy on the cheese. Less would have been more in this case. The pie was topped with a brandy-infused salami, mushrooms, black olives and fennel sausage...taste was great as was the crumb structure. The flour was KABF. Stone temp was 580F and bake time was around 8 minutes.

So far I'm happy with the outcome. ;)

« Last Edit: June 06, 2013, 05:33:03 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

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Offline dhorst

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #31 on: June 06, 2013, 05:37:13 PM »
Beautiful crumb!

Offline adm

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #32 on: June 06, 2013, 05:42:35 PM »
Stupid question, but....

What defines an artisan pizza or crust?

Surely an artisan is just a skilled craftsman? As such, you could have any style of pizza be artisanal if it were made by somebody good at their trade. I personally would also factor in high quality, preferably local ingredients and 100% hand processing, but are there any guidelines as to what is "artisanal" and what is not?

Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #33 on: June 06, 2013, 05:50:44 PM »
Stupid question, but....

What defines an artisan pizza or crust?

Surely an artisan is just a skilled craftsman? As such, you could have any style of pizza be artisanal if it were made by somebody good at their trade. I personally would also factor in high quality, preferably local ingredients and 100% hand processing, but are there any guidelines as to what is "artisanal" and what is not?

ADM,

here's a good explanation: http://howiesartisanpizza.com/media/What-ArtisanPizza_10.07.09.pdf

Or perhaps this one, with opinions from numerous people: http://www.woodstone-corp.com/blog/what-is-your-definition-of-artisan-pizza/

I agree with you but don't know if actual guidelines exist.  ???


Thanks, dhorst!
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #34 on: June 06, 2013, 08:03:47 PM »
There is a lot of interesting discussion of the artisan movement as it applies to pizza in this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3443.msg29206.html#msg29206.

Peter

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #35 on: June 06, 2013, 08:07:59 PM »
Wow, that is really a nice looking pizza!  Beautiful puffy edge. 

I have Ken's book and have been using it to make bread for the past few months; also some pizza but mostly bread.  His recipes are really great; very clear and easy to follow. 

Keep up the great work Essen! 

Regards,

TinRoof

Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #36 on: June 06, 2013, 09:23:07 PM »
Wow, that is really a nice looking pizza!  Beautiful puffy edge. 

I have Ken's book and have been using it to make bread for the past few months; also some pizza but mostly bread.  His recipes are really great; very clear and easy to follow. 

Keep up the great work Essen! 

Regards,

TinRoof

TinRoof,

Thanks for the kind words. I didn't know that Ken actually has a book out. I have to look for it; thanks for the tip :)


Peter,

That is indeed a nice conversation between PfTaylor and Evelyne.
Mike

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http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Essen1

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #37 on: June 06, 2013, 09:46:23 PM »
Here are the numbers and method for those interested...

These are for two 17" pies at 630gr each.

Flour (100%):
Water (62%):
IDY (.3%):
Salt (2.5%):
Oil (1.5%):
Sugar (2%):
Total (168.3%):
Single Ball:
748.66 g  |  26.41 oz | 1.65 lbs
464.17 g  |  16.37 oz | 1.02 lbs
2.25 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.75 tsp | 0.25 tbsp
18.72 g | 0.66 oz | 0.04 lbs | 3.35 tsp | 1.12 tbsp
11.23 g | 0.4 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.5 tsp | 0.83 tbsp
14.97 g | 0.53 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.76 tsp | 1.25 tbsp
1260 g | 44.44 oz | 2.78 lbs | TF = N/A
630 g | 22.22 oz | 1.39 lbs

Thickness factor is probably around 0.085 give or take a few.

Add half the water to the bowl at a temp of 105F.
Add all the yeast and sugar. Whisk and let it sit for 10 minutes or until it starts foaming.
Then add the oil and the rest of the water.
Sift in the flour. Pour salt on top of flour and mix on Speed 1 until no raw flour is visible.

Let the dough rest for 20 minutes in the bowl. Then knead on Speed 2 for 6 minutes. Pour onto counter, give it a couple of stretch & folds, shape into a ball and place in a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the fridge (bottom) overnight. The next day, divide the dough into 630gr balls and place into individual containers. Put back into the fridge and take them out 90 minutes before use to let them come up to room temp. I placed them directly on the counter, covered with a damp towel.

I always heat my stone on the lowest rack to the max but this time I used a lower temp of 580F due to the higher sugar amount. My bake time was around 8 minutes. Now...and here's where the use of the broiler comes in...after 6 minutes, I switch over to the broiler for the last 2 minutes, maybe 3 depending on the crust's coloration. My bottom heating element cuts off the second the broiler is activated which I find pretty good because I found that it still provides a nice undercrust and takes care of the rim at the same time.

Now, you're oven may do it differently so play it by ear and keep an eye on it a little.

When it's done, let it rest for a few on a cooling rack.

Mike

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http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline adm

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Re: Artisan-inspired pizza
« Reply #38 on: June 07, 2013, 05:26:54 AM »
ADM,

here's a good explanation: http://howiesartisanpizza.com/media/What-ArtisanPizza_10.07.09.pdf

Or perhaps this one, with opinions from numerous people: http://www.woodstone-corp.com/blog/what-is-your-definition-of-artisan-pizza/

I agree with you but don't know if actual guidelines exist.  ???


Thanks, dhorst!

Good reading - many thanks!

So I am now pretty sure that it is "artisan" pizza I am trying to learn to make. Not necessarily rigidly defined by any particular style, but rather crafted with love and simplicity, made with traditional methods and the best ingredients I can source - local wherever possible.... :)