Author Topic: Neapolitan pizza dough  (Read 44277 times)

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Offline upper crust

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Neapolitan pizza dough
« on: May 06, 2005, 10:35:31 PM »
hey guys can anyone recomend a recipie for neapoitan DOC dough using tipo 00 flour?

     Im going to make it at home. Prob. 6 10inch. pies.




thanks , Chas


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2005, 11:36:48 PM »
Chas,

What brand of 00 flour do you have? And what kind of oven?

Peter

Offline upper crust

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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2005, 04:18:13 PM »
hey peter I have a custom built wood burning brick oven in the back yard. I am trying to get my hands on some caputo tipo 00 pizza flour.

thanks , Chas

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2005, 05:05:13 PM »
Chas,

Once you get some Caputo 00 pizzeria flour you have a wide range of choices, especially with your wood burning brick oven, which should give you excellent results.

As for possible recipes, you might want to go to the A16 thread, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1298.0.html, and look at Reply#5. There, you will see some links to a Molino Caputo dough recipe at the 00 flour thread and also to a Caputo 00 dough recipe originally posted by pizzanapoletana (Marco) at the sour dough starter thread. In the same threads as the two recipes, you will see some of the work I did to convert from metric to U.S. standard and to set the stage for downsizing the recipes. You will also note that at Reply #13 at the A16 thread, I downsized the Molino Caputo and Marco dough recipes so that fellow member Friz can experiment with 13-inch pizzas based on those dough recipes (a total of three versions). I don't believe there is a Caputo dough recipe that will exactly fit your requirements for six 10-inch pizzas, but if one of the recipes referenced above looks OK from your perspective, I think I should be able to convert it to meet your specific requirements. Just let me know which recipe you would like to try.

If you don't mind playing around with preferments (starters), you also have the option of using the Caputo 00 flour to make doughs such as those I experimented with at the Caputo 00 flour and Caputo 00 biga thread. The pizzas I made using the Caputo 00 flour and Caputo 00 biga had some of the tastiest and most flavorful crusts of any I have ever made. More work is involved when you use preferments, but the effort may be worth while if you don't mind the extra work.

If you want to immerse yourself in all the many possibilities and the ins and outs of the Caputo 00 flour, reading all of the above threads will put you in a small circle of experts on the subject :). And, I'm not joking. You won't find any of this stuff on the Caputo 00 (or any other 00 flour) in any book.

Peter
« Last Edit: May 07, 2005, 05:19:09 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Swiss_Chef

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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2005, 06:02:21 AM »
A friend from Naples is a pretty serious foodie and he gave me this recipe. It is simply the best dough recipe I have ever used

Alberto’s Pizza Neapolitan Pizza Dough

1/8 teaspoon yeast
250 grams lukewarm water
250 grams pizza flour

Mix together and let sit at room temperature for two hours, then place in fridge over night.

The next day add:
250 gr flour
3/4 teaspoon of salt
60-75 gr. water
1 1/2 tablespoons of olive oil

Kneed with the Kitchen-aid dough hook on lowest speed for 20 minutes.
Let rise for 1- 1 ˝ hours at room temperature and then place in fridge for 12-24 hours.
Punch down and divide into 250 gr. balls. Use right away or freeze.
When ready to use, let the ball come to room temperature and form into pizza discs.

Note: I bought a 40 cm X 40cm X 5cm granite paver at my local DIY store for 5 euros and made my own peel out of a 35 cm wide sheet very thin plywood. I heat the stone at maximum temperature for an hour before using. I have learned to add the cheese after the pizza has been in a few minutes (as you see in the first picture) it browns by the time the dough is cooked, (which it shouldn't do on a Neapolitan pizza) The second pizza is a potato and rosemary pizza. It didn't sound good to me until I tried it and now we are addicted. eat with a crisp dry white wine.
(http://www.freeimagelibrary.com/images/SWISSCHEF/2_5.jpg)

(http://www.freeimagelibrary.com/images/SWISSCHEF/dscf0011_1.jpg)
« Last Edit: August 15, 2005, 04:51:06 AM by Swiss_Chef »
"Preparing food is all about the giving of yourself to others. If you doubt that, you will never be a good chef or a gracious guest."

piroshok

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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2005, 07:33:07 AM »
On the same subject
Why Napolitani pizzaiolos are so keen on using Canadian Manitoba flour whereas Caputo seems to be preferred by people on this board?
This has me lost especially when the refer to W standards and not 0s
 

Offline ilpizzaiolo

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Re: Neapolitan pizza dough
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2005, 12:22:17 PM »
simple.... the neapolitan pizzaioli either use 00 fllour and then blend in some manitoba.. or, they buy one already blended... which  is what the caputo pizzeria flour is.... saves a step..


 

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