Author Topic: Cold Fermentation in Sealed Containers?  (Read 1079 times)

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Offline Don K

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Cold Fermentation in Sealed Containers?
« on: February 03, 2012, 07:21:05 PM »
I cold ferment my dough balls in 7-cup round Ziploc containers. I usually have to "burp" the containers once or twice to let the gasses out because the lid is bowed out due to the pressure build up.

My question is: Is there a reason that the containers have to be completely sealed, or could the lids just be put on but not pressed down until they click? I'm not sure if being exposed to a little air would be harmful to the dough or not.
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Cold Fermentation in Sealed Containers?
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2012, 07:37:34 PM »
My question is: Is there a reason that the containers have to be completely sealed, or could the lids just be put on but not pressed down until they click? I'm not sure if being exposed to a little air would be harmful to the dough or not.


Colonel_Klink,

You might take a look at the post at Reply 16 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12531.msg119822/topicseen.html#msg119822.

Peter

Offline Don K

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Re: Cold Fermentation in Sealed Containers?
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2012, 08:22:26 PM »
Thanks Peter. I'm not sure why I didn't find those threads when I searched. ???

I think that I will just put a small hole in the lids as November mentioned in one of his posts.

Don
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Offline doughboy2

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Re: Cold Fermentation in Sealed Containers?
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2012, 09:27:18 AM »
Sealing the bag would prevent any unwanted flavors from getting into your dough. I myself made a dough fermenting tub out of a small plastic tub and drilled a 3/8 inch hole in the lid. Then I installed a rubber grommet into the hole and the attached a fermenting airlock in the grommet to release the gases and not allowing any air to get into the tub. These air locks can be purchased at any home brew shop or on line at websites like www.beer-wine.com/ do note the size diameter hole you need to drill will differ from the manufacture of the air lock. So purchase your air locks and grommets first then drill the hole in the cover. This should solve your problem.

Offline Don K

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Re: Cold Fermentation in Sealed Containers?
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2012, 03:46:30 PM »
I myself made a dough fermenting tub out of a small plastic tub and drilled a 3/8 inch hole in the lid. Then I installed a rubber grommet into the hole and the attached a fermenting airlock in the grommet to release the gases and not allowing any air to get into the tub. These air locks can be purchased at any home brew shop or on line at websites like www.beer-wine.com/ do note the size diameter hole you need to drill will differ from the manufacture of the air lock. So purchase your air locks and grommets first then drill the hole in the cover.
Hmm, nice idea. I have been brewing beer for years. I have a drawer full of airlocks. One drawback that I can think of though is that the containers can't be stacked in the refrigerator.

Actually, now that I think of it, a tiny hole on top should work fine. Since CO2 is heavier than air, there will always be a layer of it on top of the dough that cannot be displaced by the lighter air in the refrigerator. This is why some homebrewers just put plastic wrap on top of their fermenters instead of a lid with an airlock. I usually only use an airlock for carboys.
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