Author Topic: degassed "blown" doughball  (Read 702 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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degassed "blown" doughball
« on: January 11, 2012, 11:56:00 AM »
If a dough ball "blows out" is it possible for it to re-rise? If so, is the flavor now not going to be right? Thanks alot!

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: degassed "blown" doughball
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2012, 12:22:48 PM »
I've seen some great pizza made with "blown out" dough balls just as they are. I would not reball and re-rise. You should be fine unless the enzymes have started to break down the gluten. If the ball is getting wet and sticky (a sign the gluten is breaking down), I'd throw it out. The texture of the crust probably won't be good.

CL
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: degassed "blown" doughball
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2012, 12:28:47 PM »
Bob,

I know that you posted recently about some MM clone doughs at the Mellow Mushroom thread. Is your concern over the MM dough balls that you discussed starting at Reply 973 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3940.msg166995.html#msg166995? If so, it sounds like you were given dough balls that were either frozen or defrosted but still cold. If the dough balls were frozen when you got them, it would take several hours at room temperature to defrost, warm up and start to rise. If the dough balls were defrosted when you got them, but still cold and in ball form, they would look dense and without a lot of volume. It would take about an hour to two hours at normal room temperature for such dough balls to warm up and expand. Depending on the amount of yeast used in the dough, the dough balls might be quite gassy with signs of bubbling in the dough, especially as you start to open up the dough balls to form skins. Commercially produced frozen dough balls contain more yeast than fresh doughs with essentially the same overall formulation and they can ferment pretty fast. However, I think you would have to go a long time, perhaps several hours at room temperature, for the dough balls to overferment. To slow down that fermentation, you would have to put the dough balls back in the refrigerator. I think you could also refreeze them. As far as flavor is concerned, doughs that have been fermented for a long time will have more byproducts of fermentation. Those are good because they contribute to the taste and flavor of the finished crust as well as to the texture of the crust.

If your question was respect to some other dough, please let me know and I will try to give you a more generic response. In fact, I see that Craig already did so.

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: degassed "blown" doughball
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2012, 01:48:46 PM »
Thanks guys...

CL,
Boy do I hear ya on that one! Some of my finest pies came from dough I had "misplaced" in the fridge for a week or even two. The dough that I was asking about was from an outside source and I wasn't familiar with how it should look.

Peter,
Yes, this was the MM dough balls that were going to see a little bit of traveling in the mail to Norma.And your description of how some commercially made dough balls are handled was spot on! This helped me a lot and as seen on my MM post of the pizza I made from this dough...it reacted well.

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


 

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