Author Topic: Hi Fellow Pizza Lovers  (Read 367 times)

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Offline luvtherays

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Hi Fellow Pizza Lovers
« on: January 11, 2012, 02:12:30 AM »
Hi,

My name is Mike and i live in Arizona. I have always loved pizza. I am kind of a health nut but when it comes to pizza i dont worry about that. I love to visit New York City. One of the most enjoyable part of my trips is going to 1 or 2 pizza parlors every day I am there. I would happily eat pizza everyday of my life.


A few years ago i started trying to make pizza. I have always run into the same main problem - the dough breaks up into holes when i try to stretch it. I have asked pizza makers in pizza parlors about how to fix it and tried to figure out from books and the internet.

I just can't seem to get it.

The bread baking bible says to use Italian Style - low gluten flour(that is my understanding). Most pizza store makers usually say to just use regular wheat flour. Last week someone in a pizza shop said i should use "High Gluten Flour". Lateley i have been trying the fleischmans pizza yeast - it seems to stretch out better but their isnt that much tast.

I would be indebted for life and invite you to my pizza parlor some day (my life long dream) with a little help - i know it is not complicated but i can not figure it out.
I'm sure you have answered this question a million times.

What kind of Flour - how much ?
What kind of yeast - how much ?
How long should i kneed ?
How long should i let it sit out/refrigerate?
Etc.

Sincerely,

Mike :) :pizza:




















Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Hi Fellow Pizza Lovers
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2012, 08:29:02 AM »
Mike,

Welcome.

The answers to your questions will vary quite widely depending on the type of pizza you want to make. So, a good starting point is for you to tell us what type or style of pizza you want to make. You can see brief descriptions of the types of pizzas covered on this forum on the index page at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php. It will also help to know what kind of equipment you have to make the dough (e.g., mixer, food processor, bread maker, by hand, etc.) and also to bake the pizzas (e.g., pizza stone/tiles, pans, disks, screens, etc.), including the type of oven.

Peter

Offline luvtherays

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Re: Hi Fellow Pizza Lovers
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2012, 07:28:03 PM »
Hi Pete,

 Thank You for the quick response. I am excited to start making some new pizzas. I like New York thin crust. I just have a regular home oven which has a high temperature of 500 degrees. I have been mixing the dough by hand with a wooden spoon. i have a bread maker but i havent used it for a while. a couple of years ago i used the breadmaker to do the mixing and kneeding. I have been cooking the pizza on a big piece of tile.

I just got a great deal on gold medal regular flour. there was a great deal so i got 5 - 5 lb bags. I recently bought some Bobs red mill vital wheat gluten flour and some high gluten flour in the bulk bin in a health food store. I have not tried the high gluten flours yet. i have experimented with quick rise yeast, regular yeast and the new pizza yeast.

I am happy to get whatever new equipment and ingredients that would make the pizza come out better (other than the oven).

Thank You,

MIke




scott123

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Re: Hi Fellow Pizza Lovers
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2012, 10:04:11 AM »
Mike, is your oven gas or electric? If it's gas, is the broiler in the main compartment or is there a separate broiling compartment?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Hi Fellow Pizza Lovers
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2012, 01:41:14 PM »
Mike,

It is always difficult to know how to instruct a new member where to start to make a NY style dough and pizza. You can start easy or you can start hard. However, unless someone has had considerable experience and been able to successfully make and manage pizza dough consistently, my usual advice is that the person start easy, with a basic recipe. I would rather that the person enjoy success, even if modest, than to embark on a course that has a high risk of failure. Once the basic recipe has been mastered, then there will be plenty of opportunity to move on to more advanced pizza making.

So, with the above as background, I would like to suggest that you read the thread starting at Reply 8 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2223.msg19563/topicseen.html#msg19563. That thread evolved over time to help new members wishing to make a basic NY style pizza using basic ingredients and a standard, unmodified home oven. For supplementary information on the NY style, you might also take a look at the Roadmap at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1453.0.html. I mention that Roadmap because it has links to posts that describe the use of bread makers (and other mixing equipment) as well as techniques for hand kneading (and a lot more). You will note that most of my work, as well as the work of many other members on the forum, is done using weight measurements rather than volume measurement. So, a piece of equipment that I personally consider mandatory is to use a good digital scale. I also think that using a quality pizza stone would be a good investment and a significant improvement over the tile that you have been using. Once you tell us what kind of oven you have, maybe scott123 can suggest a good stone to start with. If you have an electric oven, it is sometimes possible to tweak it to get several more degrees out of it.

With respect to the flours that you have on hand, the all-purpose flour and the high-gluten flour can be used to make a NY style pizza. A good bread flour can also be used. Most commercial pizzerias that specialize in the NY style use high-gluten flour. However, since you have both the all-purpose flour and the high-gluten flour, and will want to use up the all-purpose flour since you have so much of it, you might do better to use a blend of those flours rather than individually. In order to determine the precise blend, you will perhaps want to confirm that the high-gluten flour that you mentioned is actually a high-gluten flour and, if possible, determine its brand name and source. For now, I would set the vital wheat gluten aside. I have used it often to make the NY style and for a lot of my experimental work, and like it, but there are others, such as scott123, who hate it with a passion. I usually tell people to try it and decide for themselves whether they like it or not. But, for now, I suggest that you set it aside.

Once you decide how you would like to proceed, and/or if you have any questions, I suggest that you come back and tell us what you want to do. I think we should be able to come up with a basic NY style recipe to use for any number and sizes of pizzas of any desired crust thickness. The tool that I usually use for this purpose is the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html. So, along with everything else, you might want to think about the features of the NY style crust that you most prefer.

Peter

Offline luvtherays

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Re: Hi Fellow Pizza Lovers
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2012, 03:23:59 PM »
Hi Peter,

Thanks for the great information. What i'm gonna do is start with the basic recipe and this will help me to start learning. So far i've made 2 doughs and put them in the frigerator. i've made them regular flour/the high gluten i have - 50/50. I will use one dough to make a pizza tommorow and 1 the next day (about 30 hours and 54 hours).  i will also make 4 more batches - 2 with all of the high gluten i have and 2 with all purpose. i will use 1 set in 1 day and use the second set in 2 days. I figure this will help me in the learning process.
I am doing the recipe via volume. im gona try to get a stone and scale in the next couple of weeks. the 2 batches (dough) i have already made have come out better than my previous - they seem to have the flour more absorbed with water than previous attempts. i have done them all by hand rather than a mixer.

i will keep you up to date.

Sincerely,

MIke



 

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