Author Topic: Chasing that Perfect Pan Pizza  (Read 3047 times)

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Offline hotsawce

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Re: Chasing that Perfect Pan Pizza
« Reply #50 on: April 16, 2016, 04:28:50 PM »
Chau,

Awesome. Fat used in the bottom of the pan? Bake time/temp?

I actually prefer the way oil bakes the bottom of my pies (doesn't get as dark as crisco, yet seems a bit more crunchy...even when blonde.) The only problem is my pies spring back so much I never have a chance to proof them adequately.

So... Oil = Awesome bottom, proofing nightmare. Crisco = Good bottom, great proofing management.

Made a really good pan pizza for lunch today.  Baked too hot so bottom was bordering burnt.  Crunch and crumb was good tho.  And no egg whites this time.   ;D
« Last Edit: April 16, 2016, 04:31:44 PM by hotsawce »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Chasing that Perfect Pan Pizza
« Reply #51 on: April 17, 2016, 08:51:36 AM »
Lou I do a really thin layer of cold butter.  I also kept the pan in the freezer to keep that butter from melting at RT.  Baked at 525F on lower rack fro 10m, then middle rack for 6m.  This dough also had 0.5% LDMP, which affects crust coloration.  I think it would have been ok at this temp without the LDMP. 

Even with the butter or Crisco, I need to let my dough relax in the pan and do several cycles of restretches between rests to get the edges and corners just right. 

Offline Portmantoe

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Re: Chasing that Perfect Pan Pizza
« Reply #52 on: April 21, 2016, 01:03:21 PM »
Thank you Parellei for the baking suggestion.  I'll give that a shot and see what I get. 

Lou, I also use the Loyd Pans,  both the small and larger one.  I've always used butter flavored crisco until recently made the switch to butter.  I have also notice the sticking of burnt cheese to the sides but not the bottom.  I don't have a good remedy for this.  I have tried both washing the pan with a little soap and reoiling it as oppose to just wiping it clean.  Doesn't seem to make a difference.

When I first got the pans, I had some of season chip away, so I baked both pans on the clean cycle in my oven and reseasoned them with flax seed oil. This seem to help for a while but eventually the sides are slowly flaking off in bits with each cleaning of stuck cheese off of the sides.   :-\

I can confirm that chipping is expected, especially for the first couple of bakes. I bought close to 100 DSP pans from Shawn Randazzo right before he switched to Lloyd. At first, they were an absolute nightmare (see attached pic). This degree of chipping happened to the first 30 pans on their first run through the oven. After a lot of trial and error, Shawn and I worked out a revised method for breaking them in:

1) Make a batch of dough that is drier, through more flour in during mixing until it doesn't stick to bowl and is not as loose and wet.

2) Make dough balls with the dough and let sit for few uncovered so tops get even a little drier.

3) Oil the new pans very good sides corners everywhere coat very good with nice amount of oil.

4) Take the dough balls and apply a little oil to top dry side and then place the dry oiled side down in pan.

5) Press dough out as normally would, if need to relax a little let it sit so can manage to fully press out. With all the oil it may be a little hard, but once relaxed enough piece of cake.

6) Now once fully pressed out (no need to let rise too much) and before throwing in oven peel back dough from pan, if sticking to pan now you will have a hard time with sticking when baking, If peels right off pan with no sticking you are in good shape and can place in oven. If was sticking I suggest pulling dough out of pan and getting any other dough that stuck out and re-oil and try again.

7) If not sticking to pan, throw in oven. Ideally if perfect after about 10 mins you should be able to shake pan and dough should free itself. You then would just pull and flop pan upside down and crust should fall right out. If not coming right out by shaking you may have to use spatula to work crust out, but should look nothing like the picture you attached, maybe only a tiny bit of seasoning might come off. Make sure you do not bake too long either. I think I might reference "Burn Off" in the instructions, I should probably reword since when I say "Burn Off" to me means just bake dough long enough until it can freely come out of the pan so like 10 mins or so. The word "Burn" I guess can be deceiving.

The TL;DR use a low hydration dough, an oven temp of 475-500, and only bake them for around 6-8 minutes. Rinse and repeat a few times before using your "real" DSP/pan pizza recipe.

The Lloyd pans, however, seem less prone to chipping, so YMMV. I've had the pans for 2 years now and have reseasoned them once. Now they bake up incredibly beautiful pies. The second pic is of the undercarriage I get now from the same pans that chipped so horribly at first.


« Last Edit: April 21, 2016, 01:07:10 PM by Portmantoe »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Chasing that Perfect Pan Pizza
« Reply #53 on: April 21, 2016, 02:49:08 PM »
Portmantoe, thank you for the detailed post.   I don't have any issues with the bottom or corners sticking at all.  Comes off clean.  It's just the sides.   Any suggestions?  Maybe I just need to keep the sauce and cheese away from the edges and leave a run.   ???


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Chasing that Perfect Pan Pizza
« Reply #54 on: April 24, 2016, 11:49:25 AM »
Made a good pan pizza for breakfast.  Retoasted for an extra crunch.  Yumm.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2016, 02:02:18 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline carl333

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Re: Chasing that Perfect Pan Pizza
« Reply #55 on: April 25, 2016, 06:28:21 PM »
Awesome looking pie Chau. If I was in the vicinity, I would invite myself over for a slice or 2.
Carl

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Chasing that Perfect Pan Pizza
« Reply #56 on: May 21, 2016, 12:43:23 PM »
How was the crumb?  Did you like the long bake times along with par baking over a quick and hot bake?  What oven did you bake these in?  They look good.  Btw, your in box is full again.

I'm also baking squares tonight.  I'll post my results later.  Doing some new things tonight.  Upping the % of dry milk from 2 to 5%.  Also using butter in the dough as my fat instead of my usual coconut oil. 
« Last Edit: May 21, 2016, 12:51:59 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Arctic Pizza

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Re: Chasing that Perfect Pan Pizza
« Reply #57 on: May 21, 2016, 12:46:04 PM »
How was the crumb?  Did you like the long bake times along with par baking over a quick and hot bake?  What oven did you bake these in?  They look good.  Btw, your in box is full again.

The Sicilians we do at work are different than what I've been trying at home with the L&B clone and done in traditional NY street pizzeria style.  These were baked in a bakers pride oven.  Crumb is soft crust is crispy.  Not as soft as L&B and not as thick.  More oil.

Deleted my inbox.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2016, 12:49:29 PM by Arctic Pizza »