Author Topic: Any good whole wheat pizza dough recipes?  (Read 137 times)

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Offline amooola

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Any good whole wheat pizza dough recipes?
« on: October 14, 2014, 03:18:30 PM »
I have a regular customer asking if I could make one. I'd like to try it out
« Last Edit: October 14, 2014, 03:25:06 PM by amooola »


Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Any good wheat pizza dough recipes?
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2014, 03:21:15 PM »
I assume you mean whole wheat.  I have tried but never been able to make an edible one with more than 30% whole wheat, and even then it was just edible, not good.

Offline amooola

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Re: Any good wheat pizza dough recipes?
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2014, 03:25:38 PM »
I assume you mean whole wheat.  I have tried but never been able to make an edible one with more than 30% whole wheat, and even then it was just edible, not good.

Yes, whole wheat. I will play around with some recipes I found online and see how that works out. Hopefully someone has a good one here!

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Any good whole wheat pizza dough recipes?
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2014, 03:31:17 PM »
I would try a search, I am sure someone has.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Any good whole wheat pizza dough recipes?
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2014, 04:11:25 PM »
Whole-wheat doughs are actually pretty easy to make once you know the trick.
The trick is in using a soaker, here is how it's done:
Use any whole wheat flour, but whole white wheat flour works the best from a flavor point of view.
Weigh 10-ounces of the flour into a suitable container, add 7-ounces of water and stir until it comes to the consistency of wet oatmeal, let this rest at room temperature for 30-minutes, then check to see if it has firmed up and taken on something of a dry appearance and feel, if it has, add another ounce of water and stir in, wait another 30-minutes before checking. If the dough feels tacky you are done with this part, if it feels dry, add another ounce and continue until you see the tacky dough we're looking for.
Divide the water weight by the flour weight and multiply by 100. Lets say 8-ounces of water resulted in the sticky dough we were looking for,  8 divided by 10 X 100 = 80%. Subtract 5% from this and you get 75% which is the correct absorption for your specific flour at hand.
Into your mixing bowl weigh out the amount of flour you want to use and then add 75% absorption to the flour, stir together at low speed to thoroughly wet the flour, cover and set aside to hydrate for 60-minutes, then add the remainder of your ingredient for your dough and mix just until the dough begins to take on a smooth appearance. Take the dough immediately to the bench for scaling and balling, cold ferment for 24 to 36-hours, remove from the cooler, allow to warm to 50F and open into pizza skins as you would any other dough. That's the only way you can make a decent whole-wheat pizza, or any other type of product from whole wheat flour. If you just add water and mix in the usual manner the dough will be under absorbed with poor handling properties and even poorer eating characteristics after baking. Don't worry if the whole-wheat dough feels a little tacky, this is normal for a whole-wheat dough, we go so far as to tell our students that if the dough isn't a little tacky the dough absorption is probably a little low and finished product quality will suffer.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline amooola

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Re: Any good whole wheat pizza dough recipes?
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2014, 04:38:15 PM »
Whole-wheat doughs are actually pretty easy to make once you know the trick.
The trick is in using a soaker, here is how it's done:
Use any whole wheat flour, but whole white wheat flour works the best from a flavor point of view.
Weigh 10-ounces of the flour into a suitable container, add 7-ounces of water and stir until it comes to the consistency of wet oatmeal, let this rest at room temperature for 30-minutes, then check to see if it has firmed up and taken on something of a dry appearance and feel, if it has, add another ounce of water and stir in, wait another 30-minutes before checking. If the dough feels tacky you are done with this part, if it feels dry, add another ounce and continue until you see the tacky dough we're looking for.
Divide the water weight by the flour weight and multiply by 100. Lets say 8-ounces of water resulted in the sticky dough we were looking for,  8 divided by 10 X 100 = 80%. Subtract 5% from this and you get 75% which is the correct absorption for your specific flour at hand.
Into your mixing bowl weigh out the amount of flour you want to use and then add 75% absorption to the flour, stir together at low speed to thoroughly wet the flour, cover and set aside to hydrate for 60-minutes, then add the remainder of your ingredient for your dough and mix just until the dough begins to take on a smooth appearance. Take the dough immediately to the bench for scaling and balling, cold ferment for 24 to 36-hours, remove from the cooler, allow to warm to 50F and open into pizza skins as you would any other dough. That's the only way you can make a decent whole-wheat pizza, or any other type of product from whole wheat flour. If you just add water and mix in the usual manner the dough will be under absorbed with poor handling properties and even poorer eating characteristics after baking. Don't worry if the whole-wheat dough feels a little tacky, this is normal for a whole-wheat dough, we go so far as to tell our students that if the dough isn't a little tacky the dough absorption is probably a little low and finished product quality will suffer.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Thank you so much for the response. I will do this now so that the dough is ready for the weekend! I will let you know my results.


 

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