Author Topic: Using beer in your pizza dough  (Read 118302 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #200 on: October 01, 2012, 09:08:43 AM »
Tom,

I agree, great looking pizza!  ;)

Norma
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Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #201 on: October 01, 2012, 10:34:36 AM »
Hello Chicago Bob,

It was a lot of work blending all the cheeses, but it was so worth the effort. It is a good feeling knowing that you made the pizza yourself and that your giving your family and friends the very BEST that you can offer. All the way from the best beer in the dough making process, to the hand pick tomatoes, to the best cheeses, cooked in your own home and cleanest kitchen. LOVE IT!!!!!

TomN
ps
Thanks Norma

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #202 on: October 01, 2012, 11:31:20 AM »
Hello Chicago Bob,

It was a lot of work blending all the cheeses, but it was so worth the effort. It is a good feeling knowing that you made the pizza yourself and that your giving your family and friends the very BEST that you can offer. All the way from the best beer in the dough making process, to the hand pick tomatoes, to the best cheeses, cooked in your own home and cleanest kitchen. LOVE IT!!!!!

TomN
ps
Thanks Norma
Well said.
Speaking of best cheeses...your link to Beecher's Cheese takes you to their "Flagship" chedder...$20 bucks a pound.  :o  I hope your family and friends know that you truly are giving them the best of your best!!  :chef:
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #203 on: October 02, 2012, 12:02:04 AM »
Well said.
Speaking of best cheeses...your link to Beecher's Cheese takes you to their "Flagship" chedder...$20 bucks a pound.  :o  I hope your family and friends know that you truly are giving them the best of your best!!  :chef:

Thank you Bob,

Family and friends, who eats the pizza I make, know how much work it takes to make it. That's why I enjoy doing it so much. As for the Beecher's Cheese, I found that I can purchase it at Costco Wholesale for a better price. This cheese is amazing by itself on a cracker, but I love to put some chucks of it on my White Pizza as well. Here are some photos of the pricing at Costco Wholesale in my area of the country. WA state.

Finally, there is a Pizzeria in Seattle that uses this cheese on one of their specialty pizzas. It is fantastic too.

Salumi Mole—Mole salami from Salumi, Beecher’s
Flagship, fresh mozzarella, green onions & roasted garlic
on savory red sauce (limited availability)—$21

http://veracipizza.com/menu.html

http://veracipizza.com/

« Last Edit: October 02, 2012, 12:18:15 AM by TomN »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #204 on: October 02, 2012, 12:12:16 AM »
Niiice...less than half. ;)
You have me interested in this cheese now tom and I will report price this weekend at Bj's club (pretty sure I have seen it there)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #205 on: October 03, 2012, 11:44:54 AM »
Awesome~! I'll have to look for it in my local Costco. Is this essentially a Mozz. type cheese?

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #206 on: October 03, 2012, 01:25:57 PM »
http://veracipizza.com/menu.html

First time I'v seen 15in pies done WFO Neapolitan...
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #207 on: October 03, 2012, 01:51:19 PM »
Awesome~! I'll have to look for it in my local Costco. Is this essentially a Mozz. type cheese?

Hi DNA Dan,

It is not a Mozz cheese. I use it to add to the flavor of the mozz cheese. Beecher's Flagship has a robust (Sharp) and nutty flavor.

TomN

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #208 on: October 03, 2012, 02:05:22 PM »
Flagship is a cheddar-style cheese with an appealing creamy texture and nutty flavor — but what I’m really excited about is Flagship’s cousin, Flagship Reserve.

To make the Reserve, Beecher’s cheesemakers wrap wheels of Flagship cheese in cheesecloth (a traditional method of aging cheddar; the cloth protects the rind from drying out over time) and then allow the wheels to cure for up to 18 months. The wheels are attentively nurtured during that time, rotated and brushed off frequently to maximize their longevity and flavor potential.
 
The result is an Old World style cheddar that’s rich with complex flavor. Flagship Reserve starts out a bit lemony-citrusy on the tongue, then soon mellows into a slightly sweet, nutty fruitiness reminiscent of a good Parmigiano-Reggiano. Caramel notes — deeply seductive in aged cheeses — abound. So good is this cheese that it was awarded an impressive second place overall, in a field of more than 1,200 cheeses, at the American Cheese Society Competition in 2007. Now that’s good local cheese.
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #209 on: October 04, 2012, 02:24:51 PM »
Flagship is a cheddar-style cheese with an appealing creamy texture and nutty flavor — but what I’m really excited about is Flagship’s cousin, Flagship Reserve.

To make the Reserve, Beecher’s cheesemakers wrap wheels of Flagship cheese in cheesecloth (a traditional method of aging cheddar; the cloth protects the rind from drying out over time) and then allow the wheels to cure for up to 18 months. The wheels are attentively nurtured during that time, rotated and brushed off frequently to maximize their longevity and flavor potential.
 
The result is an Old World style cheddar that’s rich with complex flavor. Flagship Reserve starts out a bit lemony-citrusy on the tongue, then soon mellows into a slightly sweet, nutty fruitiness reminiscent of a good Parmigiano-Reggiano. Caramel notes — deeply seductive in aged cheeses — abound. So good is this cheese that it was awarded an impressive second place overall, in a field of more than 1,200 cheeses, at the American Cheese Society Competition in 2007. Now that’s good local cheese.

Bob,

Costco has the Reserve for $12.85 a pound. I will post a picture later today.

TomN
PS
Thank you for explaining the cheese.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #210 on: October 04, 2012, 03:00:46 PM »
Bob,

Costco has the Reserve for $12.85 a pound. I will post a picture later today.

TomN
PS
Thank you for explaining the cheese.
That sounds like an excellent price for the "Reserve"...I'm going to BJ's club on Sat.and will report if they have it.
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #211 on: October 04, 2012, 11:34:29 PM »
As Promised the photos

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #212 on: October 05, 2012, 10:29:38 AM »
How's she taste Tom? Noticeably better than the non-reserve?  Thanks!
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #213 on: October 05, 2012, 11:20:13 AM »
How's she taste Tom? Noticeably better than the non-reserve?  Thanks!

I have not compared the two yet, but I will.

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #214 on: October 06, 2012, 01:51:07 AM »
Made dough tonight for some weekend pizza, using an IPA beer for the first time. I was able to purchase an IPA called PLINY THE ELDER from a friend that owns a convenience store. Since I am not an IPA drinker, I am not sure how to describe this beer or what to compare it with? However, this beer did have a unique and very smooth taste. Best of all, it worked well with the dough and it appears that I will have some really nice dough after the 24 hour cold rise.

Unfortunately, this beer is hard to find and it is expensive. So far, I like what I see in the dough and i will show the finished product soon.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2012, 01:59:35 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #215 on: October 06, 2012, 01:54:47 AM »
More dough making photos with PLINY THE ELDER.

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #216 on: October 06, 2012, 01:55:41 AM »
You can see how nice the dough looks, even before the 24 hour cold rise.


Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #217 on: October 07, 2012, 05:55:08 PM »
The dough turned out really nice after the 24 hour cold rise. I divide the large dough ball into three smaller dough balls which can make a 14" pizza per ball.

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #218 on: October 07, 2012, 05:57:14 PM »
The pizza turned out very nice and I would use this beer again. However, it is very difficult to find and expensive.

It is hard to beat the price and availability of Red Hook ESB. (Extra Special Bitter)  Also, I did have one person request going back to Red Hook ESB pizza dough.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2012, 05:58:58 PM by TomN »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #219 on: October 07, 2012, 07:10:08 PM »
Look'in good Tom.  ;)
What was your handling procedure after balling up the 3 dough balls?
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Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #220 on: October 09, 2012, 01:49:16 PM »
Look'in good Tom.  ;)
What was your handling procedure after balling up the 3 dough balls?

After making the smaller dough balls, I immediately bag those that I will not use at the moment and let them continue to proof in the fridge. Because I use Pendleton Power Flour, they can last longer in the fridge, due to the high gluten and protein in the flour.

I used to press the dough balls out on a large white cutting board, but now I can press them out directly on my new Quartz counter tops. I clean the counter top very well and them sprinkle a little amount of all purpose flour on the counter.

During the press out process, the dough will stick to the counter top making it easy to press out. I will flip the dough over, adding a little more flour on the counter. The dough pressing process is like using all ten fingers on your key board. It leaves a “Waffle Marking” on the dough. This eliminates the need to dock the dough. (Those who hand toss their dough in the air might disagree with this method, but keep in mind, I am cooking this on a pizza screen in a home oven at 425 degrees for 15 minutes. I do not have access to a commercial pizza oven or wood fire oven at this time.)

Near completion of the dough being pressed out, I place a pizza screen over the dough to measure the size. With a pizza screen, the dough can be shaped to fit it even if your pressed out dough is larger than the screen. The cooked pizza dough turns out fantastic. Light and bubbly effect with a very nice crust.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2012, 06:57:48 PM by TomN »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #221 on: October 09, 2012, 06:46:01 PM »
Thanks Tom...gotta love those multi-tasking countertops.  ;D
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #222 on: October 12, 2012, 12:51:10 AM »
Getting ready for weekend Pizza. I made dough tonight using a beer called, SUPPLICATION. It is made by the Russian River Brewing Company, the same company that makes Pliny the Elder IPA beer. This beer has been barrel aged for 12 to 15 months in used Pinot Noir wine barrels. Also, they add cherries to the beer brewing process and it gives this beer a sour taste, IMO.

I wanted to try this beer in my pizza dough one time. I say one time because the beer cost $12 for a 12.68 Fl OZ bottle. Not one that I want to drink either, but i said that about Samuel Adams barley wine beer and it produced a really fantastic tasting dough. So, I will see how it turns out and give you a report after the 24 hour cold rise.

Here is what their website says:

http://russianriverbrewing.com/brews/supplication/
« Last Edit: October 12, 2012, 01:02:21 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #223 on: October 12, 2012, 12:56:21 AM »
I always give my dough ball a light coating of Extra Virgin Olive Oil before I bag it for the 24 cold rise.

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #224 on: October 14, 2012, 11:17:18 PM »
I gave the dough 48 hours to cold rise and develop more flavor. I liked how this pizza dough turned out. The smell of the dough (before cooking it) had that sour cherry smell, which was really nice. I can NOT say that the cherry flavor came through but the dough texture was really nice and it worked very well. I would use this beer again if the price was not at $12.00 plus tax. I understand the pricing since the beer was aged for 12 to 15 months in used Pinot Noir wine barrels. However, it is a one time bottle for me as far as dough making goes.

I made two pizzas and a third pizza the next day. In the photo, I have a finished pizza out of the oven and one ready to be made. Fortunately, i had an extra bottle of Pliny the Elder on hand to have with the pizza.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2012, 11:19:18 PM by TomN »


 

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