Author Topic: Using beer in your pizza dough  (Read 87616 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #560 on: June 10, 2013, 08:47:25 AM »
Your other questions, might best be answered by either Peter or Tom Lehman
ogdred,

According to the data at Nutritiondata.Self.com (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beverages/3827/2), a regular generic beer contains no Sugars. So I wouldn't worry about the need to add any sugar to the dough. As for the hydration, you might use the same ratio of beer to water that Tom uses to see if that works with your particular flour. You can always adjust the hydration in the mixer bowl if it is necessary.

Peter


Offline ogdred

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #561 on: June 10, 2013, 11:52:20 PM »
Hi ogdred,

I still add the sugar. As for the beer, it was taught to me, by a Pizzeria Friend that makes his dough this way everyday,  to use 60 percent beer and 40 percent water in your total hydration. Also, you need the water part to be at 85 degrees when you make the yeast mixture in a separate glass with the sugar. I try different beers just for the fun of it, but I try to stay away from the darker beers. (although my last beer was pretty dark)

Beers that never miss the mark are:
Samuel Adams Double Bock, or S.A. Cinder Bock
Blue Moon Belgian White Belgian-Style Wheat Ale,
Red Hook Extra Special Bitter, (my Pizzeria friend only uses this beer)
Duvel Belgian Golden Ale
Pliny the Elder IPA (if you can find it).


Your other questions, might best be answered by either Peter or Tom Lehman

Hope that helps,

TomN

Hi Tom,

I guess I am approaching the experiment in a slightly different way, trying to see the effect of beer on my standard crust rather than trying for a new recipe that is the best showcase of beer.  Have read that the resulting dough should be more supple, which was perhaps true in my case, but I think it was perhaps under hydrated or had too much gluten development, and that changed my dough substantially from the usual.

My two 24 hour doughs were hard to stretch, browned very quickly in contact with the stone, throwing off my balance of top and bottom heat, and had more oven spring than I normally see, again possibly a result of the dough not being stretched as much. The suppleness I felt more when shaping than when I went to stretch it out.

Out of curiosity, have you tried your recipe with water and no beer, to see the beer effects? I assume the experiments you have done, as well as your preferred beers are based primarily on taste. Is that correct? Or do you find any other changes, such as browning apparent as you change the beer you use?

I haven't found temperature a particularly important in any of the doughs I make, and normally use refrigerated water and go straight to a cold ferment. Were you given any reason why you had to prepare the yeast in this way? I did a sort of autolyse with the beer and flour, and mixed my IDY in after.

Thanks,
Ogdred

Offline ogdred

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #562 on: June 10, 2013, 11:56:28 PM »
According to the data at Nutritiondata.Self.com (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beverages/3827/2), a regular generic beer contains no Sugars. So I wouldn't worry about the need to add any sugar to the dough.

Oh, that is surprising to me. Beer tastes fairly sweet, I just naively assumed it must have some sugars in it. Ay idea what in beer would have caused the rapid browning?

Offline gixxer

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #563 on: June 12, 2013, 09:15:23 PM »
Wow, first post!!  Anyhow, depending on how the beer is brewed, it has residual sugars left over that most brewers yeast cannot digest.  Some of the styles like that scottish (which Traquair House is supposed to be the best wee heavy ever brewed, good choice!!)  or that double bock are brewed to have more of those residual sugars.

  I am a huge beer nerd and I am so jealous with all the different beers I saw in this thread!!  Some think its a waste to use the expensive craft brews, but hey, if you have the money and folks want to experiment then why not!!
« Last Edit: June 12, 2013, 09:17:10 PM by gixxer »

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #564 on: June 13, 2013, 06:50:43 PM »
Thanks gixxer,

I started this thread on January 24, 2012 and since that time, I have posted 52 different beers that have yielded three pizzas for each beer. Some beers were expensive, very limited and hard to find, and other beers were less expensive and easy to find (but still quality beers). I have had fun with this dough making experiment and plan to continue it. Thanks for you comments.

TomN
PS
Years ago, in a conversation with a well know Chef, he said, "In cooking, never use cheap ingredients if you want to produce the best food. That also includes the wine or beer that you cook with."
« Last Edit: June 13, 2013, 07:52:36 PM by TomN »

Offline gixxer

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #565 on: June 13, 2013, 11:31:50 PM »
Agreed.  I have an Avery Brewing Kaiser clone (imperial Oktoberfest) that I brewed recently, I am looking forward to making some dough with that.

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #566 on: June 28, 2013, 02:38:46 AM »
Maredsous - Brewed by: Brouwerij Duvel Moortgat NV, Belgium

http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/222/6972

Made dough tonight with Maredsous from Belgium. This beer had a very unique taste that will come through in the dough . A bit pricy at $12.00 for a pint, and a little extra foam (not sure why?), but worth it to try in this beer in my dough making experience.  I can already tell this beer will produce a very nice pizza dough.

TomN
« Last Edit: June 28, 2013, 02:42:13 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #567 on: June 28, 2013, 02:39:51 AM »
The back label.

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #568 on: July 08, 2013, 06:14:21 PM »
Foam usually equals over-carbonation, or, if desired, very high level of carbonation.  This could be due to the style of beer or poor bottling practice.  Often a beer can become infected with a wild yeast that will eat sugars left by the  brewing yeast and referment in the bottle causing an over-carbonated beer.  When the cap is opened and the pressure released, nucleation points on the glass or leftover yeast particles in the bottle can cause the beer to gush or foam on pouring.  The high level of dissolved carbonation would certainly cause bubbles in a dough.

Ron

Just remembered that I had the same foaming issue with another beer. Back in the day, when Meatballs (the Beer Expert) was on this forum, he helped me with beer issues or types of beer explanations. The above quote is what he has to say about foaming beers. Sure miss his beer wisdom.

TomN
« Last Edit: July 08, 2013, 06:15:58 PM by TomN »

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #569 on: July 12, 2013, 01:14:15 AM »
St. Bernardus Abt 12 Belgian Abbey Ale - Watou, Province of West Flanders in Belgium

http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/259/1708

The Beer Advocate rates this Beer at 99 and 100 points. They list it as a Quadrupel, but to me it tasted like a Double Bock. It is not a cheap beer either at $13.99 for a Pint ($15.32 with WA state tax). However, I had to try it in my dough recipe. It is a little darker than I expected for a Belgium style beer, but I was not aware it was a Quadrupel. When I held up the bottle into the light at the store, it appeared lighter. 

I can already tell this will make a really good pizza dough. The dough had a very nice sweet smell to it. Can't wait to bake it.

TomN
PS
My recipe is on page 25 of this thread:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,17415.msg245184.html#msg245184
« Last Edit: July 12, 2013, 01:22:30 AM by TomN »


Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #570 on: July 12, 2013, 01:16:06 AM »
Kneaded this dough for 10 minutes in my Kitchen Aid. This dough has a wonderful smell during the kneading process.

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #571 on: July 12, 2013, 01:16:54 AM »
Formed into three dough balls and into the Fridge for the cold rise process. This will make three 14" pizzas.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2013, 01:47:11 PM by TomN »

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #572 on: July 13, 2013, 01:13:09 AM »
Garlic Beef Tenderloin Filet Mignon Pizza

I really enjoyed the dough that I made with St. Bernardus Abt 12 and I made a pizza that I have wanted to make for some time. I borrowed the idea from a Pizzeria and made a few changes to the recipe which i will give to you.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2013, 01:53:49 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #573 on: July 13, 2013, 01:18:34 AM »
In advance, cook on your grill,  one Beef Tenderloin Filet Mignon that has been sliced very thin. This will keep away any blood from getting on your pizza. I always use Choice Grade meat.

Be sure to add a little seasoning to your meat for that extra flavor.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2013, 02:02:42 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #574 on: July 13, 2013, 01:21:05 AM »
Also, chop up some Garlic cloves in advance.

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #575 on: July 13, 2013, 01:21:44 AM »
Press out your favorite dough ball.  This is the dough that I made with St. Bernardus Abt 12, but you can use your favorite beer. (Just avoid a stout beer)

Dough Recipe:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,17415.msg245184.html#msg245184
« Last Edit: July 13, 2013, 01:55:24 AM by TomN »

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #576 on: July 13, 2013, 01:22:45 AM »
Brush on a nice amount of Extra Virgin Olive oil

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #577 on: July 13, 2013, 01:23:38 AM »
Add the chopped garlic

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #578 on: July 13, 2013, 01:28:02 AM »
Sprinkle some Oregano, shredded Parmesan Cheese, and a pinch of Sea Salt.

I happened to have shredded Parmesan & Romano on hand.

Offline TomN

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Re: Using beer in your pizza dough
« Reply #579 on: July 13, 2013, 01:28:57 AM »
Cover the pizza with Whole Milk Mozzarella Cheese.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2013, 02:04:24 AM by TomN »


 

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