Author Topic: Can a Wet Gluten Mass be incorporated into another dough?  (Read 1081 times)

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Offline norma427

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Can a Wet Gluten Mass be incorporated into another dough?
« on: January 26, 2012, 09:08:25 AM »


Tom,

I have a question I would like to ask you.  Peter, Bob, and I were playing around with trying a few tests trying to determine the hydration of a MM dough at Reply 899 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3940.msg164194.html#msg164194 and how much protein is in wet gluten masses at Reply 1066 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3940.msg168234.html#msg168234 and other posts on the Mellow Mushroom thread.  Just to give you a few examples to a few of the posts, Peter posted at Reply 1072 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3940.msg168257.html#msg168257 about doing a wet gluten mass test at Reply 23 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,783.msg7865/topicseen.html#msg7865  and where I did the wet gluten bake test at Reply 1081 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3940.msg168332.html#msg168332
Bob sent me two MM dough balls to do tests on.  I used the one dough ball for hydration tests, wet gluten mass tests, and to bake into a pizza.  I then also did gluten mass tests on KASL, Power, Flour and KABF with one post being at Reply 1102 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3940.msg168392.html#msg168392

Sorry, to be giving you all the links, but what I really wonder and am curious about is if a wet gluten mass can be incorporated into a lower protein flour dough, so the gluten does become stronger with a lower protein flour.  Did you ever do that experiment, or know how someone else might have done that experiment?  I have no way of knowing if it might work, or where to start in trying an experiment with wet gluten mass.  Is a wet gluten mass anything like VWG?  I donít know. but think my gluten masses started to deteriorate in about a day, from bake tests on those gluten masses.  I showed that experiment, but wonít bother you with those links.

Thanks,

Norma
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Can a Wet Gluten Mass be incorporated into another dough?
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2012, 09:27:30 AM »
Norma;
We do a wet gluten test where we manually wash the gluten out of the flour under very COLD water. You can then weigh the wet gluten ball weight and divide it by the weight of the flour that you washed it from to get a WET GLUTEN PERCENT, but doesn't mean a lot to most people since when citing gluten we speak in DRY gluten terms, you need to dry the gluten ball in an oven (typically overnight) and use that weight divided by the flour weight. There is a machine that is used to do all of this automatically, it is called the Glutomatic Gluten Washing Machine.
As for incorporating wet gluten into a dough, lotsa luck! That gluten ball is so tough and rubbery that it is impossible to incorporate into any kind of a dough. It kinda reminds one of a well chewed rubber band.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline norma427

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Re: Can a Wet Gluten Mass be incorporated into another dough?
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2012, 09:46:01 AM »
Norma;
We do a wet gluten test where we manually wash the gluten out of the flour under very COLD water. You can then weigh the wet gluten ball weight and divide it by the weight of the flour that you washed it from to get a WET GLUTEN PERCENT, but doesn't mean a lot to most people since when citing gluten we speak in DRY gluten terms, you need to dry the gluten ball in an oven (typically overnight) and use that weight divided by the flour weight. There is a machine that is used to do all of this automatically, it is called the Glutomatic Gluten Washing Machine.
As for incorporating wet gluten into a dough, lotsa luck! That gluten ball is so tough and rubbery that it is impossible to incorporate into any kind of a dough. It kinda reminds one of a well chewed rubber band.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom,

Peter and I also did the same wet gluten tests, where we manually washed the starches and molecules out of the dough ball, while running it under cold water.  Peter did reference a link about the Glutomatic Gluten Washing Machine.  I didnít know the wet gluten mass needed to be dried in an oven overnight.  The only test I did was to bake the wet gluten masses (in the 400 degrees F range) and when they were finished baking all you saw was the large gluten network.  The resulting dried gluten masses tasted something like a nutty bread without salt.  I guess there is no way of doing an experiment from what you posted.  I know when we speak of gluten (VWG) it usually is in dry form.

Thanks, so much for your time.  :)

Norma
« Last Edit: January 26, 2012, 09:47:37 AM by norma427 »
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